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One voice: There is no chest voice or head voice.

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izzle1989
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I was once an advocate of the chest voice head voice terminology, but now I firmly believe that there is no chest or head voice only one voice.

I understand that people are going to say that the voice resonates in two different areas which is understandable because different pitches resonate in different areas. The misconception is thinking that you have to navigate through you break or bridge. I feel that there is only a break or bridge because we are not strong enough or coordinated enough to get through our entire range without drastically changing the way the vocal folds are vibrating.

I know you all have some comments and may bash my reasoning, but I say bring it on I like a challenge :cool:

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Well, until we're strong and coordinated enough, there will be breaks and bridges. Not to mention that you do need to learn doing specific things in specific areas of your voice so you can negotiate them easily afterwards.

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Well, until we're strong and coordinated enough, there will be breaks and bridges. Not to mention that you do need to learn doing specific things in specific areas of your voice so you can negotiate them easily afterwards.

Some of these specific this that I see people learning are not very beneficial to gaining the complete range. What type of things are you referring to?

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Inrease support, lighten the phonation (in practice, until you gain strength and coordination), start modifying vowels. That sort of stuff :)

I never said that you didn't have to modify vowels, but lightening up the phonation "purposely" will only make you go into falsetto.

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Actually falsetto occurs mostly when you weigh down the voice too much. It's when the voice flips to falsetto. If you lighten it purposefully, you're on your way to getting a better feel for what's happening in your body.

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Actually falsetto occurs mostly when you weigh down the voice too much. It's when the voice flips to falsetto. If you lighten it purposefully, you're on your way to getting a better feel for what's happening in your body.

It happens more often when trying to "hold" on to the weight of the lower pitches, but that doesn't mean it is connected just because you lighten it.

Can you do descending slides in this way without breaking or hearing fry like noise?

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The head voice / chest voice thing helps the beginner get used to letting the CT do stretching for higher pitches. If the singer tries to go higher with the speaking voice configuration (TA dominance) they often will run into road blocks. It can take a while. Once the coordination is worked out - I agree - it is one continuous voice. No need to make the distinction.

Then there is the Formant shift that helps certain vowels at certain pitches - that's a totally different thing than Chest voice / Head voice.

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The head voice / chest voice thing helps the beginner get used to letting the CT do stretching for higher pitches. If the singer tries to go higher with the speaking voice configuration (TA dominance) they often will run into road blocks. It can take a while. Once the coordination is worked out - I agree - it is one continuous voice. No need to make the distinction.

Then there is the Formant shift that helps certain vowels at certain pitches - that's a totally different thing than Chest voice / Head voice.

Now I agree with this statement.

I just see too many singers including intermediate to advance singers "try" to avoid the break by switching the coordination from TA dominant to CT dominant which makes for an abrupt change in timbre.

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I'm talking about lightening the phonation on the way up, not on the way down :)

And yes, I can, of course, I'm not a beginner; also, I've never had falsetto in my life, only clean head voice even with the lightest of connections. Also, I thought we're talking about beginners here, not intermediate and advanced singers?

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I'm talking about lightening the phonation on the way up, not on the way down :)

And yes, I can, of course, I'm not a beginner; also, I've never had falsetto in my life, only clean head voice even with the lightest of connections. Also, I thought we're talking about beginners here, not intermediate and advanced singers?

I'm mainly directing this towards the people who can't keep there voice connected and purposefully "switch" you just so happened to be the first to respond LOL

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Tricky subject.

Head and chest original meannings had nothing to do with larynx coordination, but on sensations used to describe and train a voice to sing at the best possible efficiency.

What if I said that you can have falsetto without air, a tense squeacky tone and full voice using the same resonance strategy, or placement? Although the squeacky version will not be forward.

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Tricky subject.

Head and chest original meannings had nothing to do with larynx coordination, but on sensations used to describe and train a voice to sing at the best possible efficiency.

What if I said that you can have falsetto without air, a tense squeacky tone and full voice using the same resonance strategy, or placement? Although the squeacky version will not be forward.

I understand that they hand nothing to do with larynx coordination before, but now people are calling "falsetto" head voice and saying that a disconnected tone is still head voice when true head voice is the balance between the chest and head voice musculature. This relationship should exist even if you are singing the lowest note in you range the balance just changes slightly.

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Actually falsetto occurs mostly when you weigh down the voice too much. It's when the voice flips to falsetto. If you lighten it purposefully, you're on your way to getting a better feel for what's happening in your body.

that depends on the singer. you don't "have" to lighten, beginner or advanced. you lighten fold mass. it's thinned out and taut up high, yes, but it's not mandatory to lighten the voice up high.

it all according to what you started with. if you are doing loud, full voice scales, you start loud and end similarly.

you can remain loud and powerful up high if you are strong enough and tap into the correctly efficient resonating pocket.

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Izzle you are right but you're probably not just fully on cue with all terms.

When we speak of f.ex. edge overdrive curbing etc it's all one seamless voice, it's more like submodes to the performing voice (think different volumes, amounts of twang makes different modes).

I agree that it's weird to call falsetto with a little cord closure for "pure head" because it gives a false sense of accomplishment - it's so very easy to do.

Chest & head is just a very flawed attempt to break down the voice (hence the never ending arguments where the problem always are unclear glossary), but in practise yes the entire voice is just one single huge register when you get it right and you don't even have to think about it most of the time.

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There is just one thing that makes me question the one-voice idea. I've always wondered whether it's even humanly possible to put the CT and TA in a precise 50/50 balance and hold it there. I know that personally, if I try to sing in both chest and head at the same time, it's going to be instable and I'm going to flip back and forth a teeny bit, but I don't know if that's just the way antagonistic muscles work, or if that can eventually be reduced through lots of training in that precise 50/50 area.

What do you guys think? Is it humanly possible to sing straight tone with a perfect 50/50 mix of CT and TA activity with enough training? Or do we need to just transform that natural instability into a controlled vibrato between the slightly CT dominant and slightly TA dominant coordinations? Or do we avoid the 50/50 spot by going through an area of CT with chest resonance, or TA with head resonance, and that resonance/musculature mismatch creates the mix and smooths out the bridge?

This is one of the few things I've been wondering about lately in regards to the passagio range, as I know I can bridge the passagio, but doing it 100% consistently is the real difficult part.

owen, regarding 50/50 mix, it depends how strong you are in both musculatures. that's why the messa di voce is such a beneficial exercise. it takes you through that 50/50 place.

if you are weak in either musculature, head or chest, you'll never hold it together. if you are developed enough not only can to lean on it, (the folds) but in varying degrees.

but again, you need requisite strength and development.

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There is just one thing that makes me question the one-voice idea. I've always wondered whether it's even humanly possible to put the CT and TA in a precise 50/50 balance and hold it there. I know that personally, if I try to sing in both chest and head at the same time, it's going to be instable and I'm going to flip back and forth a teeny bit, but I don't know if that's just the way antagonistic muscles work, or if that can eventually be reduced through lots of training in that precise 50/50 area.

What do you guys think? Is it humanly possible to sing straight tone with a perfect 50/50 mix of CT and TA activity with enough training? Or do we need to just transform that natural instability into a controlled vibrato between the slightly CT dominant and slightly TA dominant coordinations? Or do we avoid the 50/50 spot by going through an area of CT with chest resonance, or TA with head resonance, and that resonance/musculature mismatch creates the mix and smooths out the bridge?

This is one of the few things I've been wondering about lately in regards to the passagio range, as I know I can bridge the passagio, but doing it 100% consistently is the real difficult part.

I don't see why striving for a 50/50 split is of particular importance. A 50/50 split would not necessarily mean you are in your mix or anything like that. If you think about it, you need to master the entire ratio 1/99 all the way to 99/1. Even then the ratio does not always directly relate to the type of sound that is produced.

I think it's easier to define head/chest due to the fact we can isolate a head and chest muscle. However, the problem comes when people try to use them exclusively in isolation.

@Izzle1989 I think to say that we don't have the strength to keep a connected voice through our range is not 100% of the argument.. co-ordination also plays a big role.

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There is just one thing that makes me question the one-voice idea. I've always wondered whether it's even humanly possible to put the CT and TA in a precise 50/50 balance and hold it there. I know that personally, if I try to sing in both chest and head at the same time, it's going to be instable and I'm going to flip back and forth a teeny bit, but I don't know if that's just the way antagonistic muscles work, or if that can eventually be reduced through lots of training in that precise 50/50 area.

What do you guys think? Is it humanly possible to sing straight tone with a perfect 50/50 mix of CT and TA activity with enough training? Or do we need to just transform that natural instability into a controlled vibrato between the slightly CT dominant and slightly TA dominant coordinations? Or do we avoid the 50/50 spot by going through an area of CT with chest resonance, or TA with head resonance, and that resonance/musculature mismatch creates the mix and smooths out the bridge?

This is one of the few things I've been wondering about lately in regards to the passagio range, as I know I can bridge the passagio, but doing it 100% consistently is the real difficult part.

Owen the ratio is never going to be 50/50 but as you become more advanced you can take more of the TA activity more towards the top of your range. The TA should always stay engaged to some degree, but the CT has to be strong enough to still be able to stretch the folds while keeping the TA engaged. You also have to be strong and coordinated enough to hold back the breath pressure as you ascend the scale.

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Izzle you are right but you're probably not just fully on cue with all terms.

When we speak of f.ex. edge overdrive curbing etc it's all one seamless voice, it's more like submodes to the performing voice (think different volumes, amounts of twang makes different modes).

I agree that it's weird to call falsetto with a little cord closure for "pure head" because it gives a false sense of accomplishment - it's so very easy to do.

Chest & head is just a very flawed attempt to break down the voice (hence the never ending arguments where the problem always are unclear glossary), but in practise yes the entire voice is just one single huge register when you get it right and you don't even have to think about it most of the time.

Well I know the terms of the anatomy, but it is hard to put that into words without using the old out dated terminology of head and chest.

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I don't see why striving for a 50/50 split is of particular importance. A 50/50 split would not necessarily mean you are in your mix or anything like that. If you think about it, you need to master the entire ratio 1/99 all the way to 99/1. Even then the ratio does not always directly relate to the type of sound that is produced.

I think it's easier to define head/chest due to the fact we can isolate a head and chest muscle. However, the problem comes when people try to use them exclusively in isolation.

@Izzle1989 I think to say that we don't have the strength to keep a connected voice through our range is not 100% of the argument.. co-ordination also plays a big role.

I don't disagree with you at all...Both strength and coordination are equally important.

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This is very true!! the vocal folds just elongate as the pitch changes :P

And the bridges are just changes of modes!

The vocal folds do elongate, but the bridges are there because of lack of coordination of the different musculature within the larynx. This causes us to abruptly change the length of the vocal folds because we abruptly release the action of the TA.

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Yes, or you can see it as changes into lighter modes too :P

-using CVT terms- As you dont have the coordination/strenght/support, you fail trying to do a metallic mode, and you bridge/break into a lighter one, like Neutral with/without air, or into MLN, or into Flageolet :)

I don't like the use of all of these "modes" I would never try to describe the voice like this, but I understand what your saying.

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