Jump to content

It's amazing how much different your voice sounds on a recording...

Rate this topic


Goggalor90
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sounds really good. Do you like or dislike how your voice sounds on that one?

I feel like I sound a lot flatter than I do in my head. I also just think my voice sounds heavy and that my volume is all over the place. I smoked for years and I have bad anxiety so my breath support is a little more limited than I'd like it to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's normal. When i heared my voice's records i just thought it's bad recorder, but when other person told me, that this sound matches my voice perfectly i just got a huge depression. It took for about two month for me to get used to my voice's real sound. Only when you will know your voice's true sound than you will be able to make it sound good, so don't warry, i assure you, that other people don't find your voice bad, it's just you, because you never knew it's true sound.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, here's me butchering Go the Distance. My pitch is so off.

"Well, here's me butchering Go the Distance. My pitch is so off.

if you talk like this, your mind will see to it that you self sabotage yourself.

"the mind cannot tell the difference between that which is real or vividly imagined."

maxwell maltz

feed the brain with positive energy. try it again and say how great it will sound because you will make it that way.

bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phones are not that great for audio recording.

I know analog phones had a very limited spectrum and certain

sounds (like the "f" sound) are hard to discern.

Get a mic and amp/audio interface and then record yourself.

You might sound "worse" on a high quality amp/audio interface

because you can clearly hear more of your mistakes.

But from what I've heard, your voice sounds good so far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are so many wrong things by judging yourself by how you sound on a phone mic. Dude, it's approximately 1 to 2 cm across and will never reproduce your voice accurately. I'd put you to sleep with the physics. And the filter circuits afterwards are designed to enhance speaking range, call it approximately middle to upper baritone, where most people's speaking voices land. It was made to make speaking at normal volume as clear as possible, not singing at high pitch. What you are hearing in playback is a result of the mic clipping. And what the circuits can handle. Loudest noise gets priority (that's called the "masking" effect.

You'd get about the same quality as singing into a soup can with a string in it that is attached to a can at the other end.

Then, again, if you like beating yourself up, I can't help you. Like Bob said, and I have said so many times that I've lost count, change your mind.

And, by the way, you cannot hear yourself like others hear you. For two reasons. First, you hear yourself through bone conduction. Second, when you hear a recording of yourself, you are still filtering it through your own peculiar psychology. And others are hearing you through their own peculiar psychologies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is one other thing to keep in mind. And I say this from personal experience. The room you record in can screw up your tone, and give you a false reading on your own voice. For years I didn't feel good about my voice - I thought: "I was born with kind of a midrangy tone that isn't very nice sounding, so I'll never be a good singer". But that was because the room I recorded in had standing waves that goofed up the recording.

I bought a reflexion filter that kills all reflections - it is like a portable vocal booth. And Wow - after I recorded, I could hear my true voice. It sounded completely different. No wierd midrange. I'm very satisfied with my tone.

You don't have to buy a reflexion filter to find this out. You can record in a dead room with carpet and drapes, or open up your closet so clothes soak up the sound, or just make sure the room is good. Try recording in different rooms. Some are good some aren't. And make sure you use a decent mic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, what is important in a recording are the artifacts of the recording itself and whatever effects to the file that happen afterward. I heard something that took me a while to understand. I recorded a song and mixed it two different ways. On the second mix, I used a different setting on the compressor plug-in. And used a factory pre-set eq. And no high-pass filter setting. And no noise reduction. So, what sounds like a really low start to a note is not actually heard in real life. It's the sound of adduction ramping up to produce a sound. Right in front of me, you would not hear it. But thanks to the operation of a compressor to make the softest sounds have equal weight in volume with the louder notes, it becomes "present."

In that line of thought, it can work the other way, too, where in a small phone mic is filtering out things, partially due to it's size and frequency response curve, partially what is happening in the design of the filter circuits in the phone, and then what is happening as the sound file is transferred from phone to computer and then, finally, what kind of file it exports as. mp3 is a widely accepted and portable format. It is also a file compression format. The main data points are kept. And some of the smaller will be lost. That's just the nature of the beast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...