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Adonis

Does anybody here have the singing key range of Bruno Mars?

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Bruno Mars is a great singer! He sings a lot of like Jackson and Sting sometimes. Big fan!

I love to perform his stuff. Personally I found that the best sound is when I use falsetto, head voice and chest voice - to make the song interesting for audience.

EDIT:

Sorry I've got a hard time with box.com lately, decided to change server.

Here's my Bruno clip I mentioned https://soundcloud.com/devaitis/nothin-on-you

cheers

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Haven't read all the posts here. But in general I want to say this: The majority of the users I've heard on this forum lacks good support. To be able to do a D5 in full voice (For Bruno Mars curbing in CVT terms) you need a really big amount of support without getting too tight and that's tricky to learn for the most of us. I think many singers underestimates the value of support. The fact that you don't hear a lot of air when you are singing doesn't mean you have good support.

For me, to be able to push my full voice over C5 in a healthy manner, good support was the key. Removes all the straining and fatigue and makes it sound better as well.

the wall, i'm one guy who agrees with you completely on support....the key!!!! that's what gives you one connected voice too!!

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Can I throw in more instrumental space to give my voice time to rest up for that impossible ending?

And that's another thing. We singers tend to concentrate on the vocal melody. We can often time be the reason that other musicians don't like singers. We hog the mic. A song where it is non-stop vocalising from beginning to end. It can be just as difficult for a singer to step back and let the song breathe as it can be for a lead guitarist.

I like the work of Yngwie Malmsteen. And I cannot sit through an entire album at once. The endless 1/132 notes from beginning to end begin to sound like a lot of noise. The one album I can listen to all the way through is the album he did of covers of his favorite songs. And that one had a number of guest singers. And the producer had to cut the guitar back long enough for the singer to sing a few lines.

Well, it can work the other way around when the singer is monopolizing the "air time." A song is more than just the vocal melody. Otherwise, we could all just sing a capella.

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I can certainly agree in terms of belting...IMO it is absolutely the #1 determining factor for successful strain-free crack-free high belting. And for me personally, luckily with any heavy phonation the support seems to come naturally. The part that doesn't come naturally is not tightening up the throat at the same time.

It's even harder to do with light phonations...that's where the support does not come naturally. I still don't yet fully understand how to support head voice. Though so far, I feel what happens with that stuff is, you need more support than you think you do. The body wants to lay off the support because the phonation is lighter, but it's also more sensitive, you can't have air rushing at it without control and clamping it off with the neck, because too much of that neck tension can really disrupt the vibration of a gentle phonation.

One of the things that really cleared things up for me is realizing that the function of support is pretty much isolated from the larynx. It is merely a substitute for constriction, where the more you support, the less you'll feel need to squeeze the neck, yet it has little, if anything, to do with the amount of cord closure. Like the wall said, just because you don't sound airy doesn't mean you are supporting correctly. You can make any sound, from air silently flowing through the glottis, all the way to a fully shut glottis, and everything in between, independently of how you are supporting. It's almost like lifting a heavy object and being able to talk comfortably through that...even though your core is actively doing its rightful job in order to pick up that item, or in our case, to stabilize that phonation, your throat has to keep functioning as if nothing unusual were happening down there.

I think I'm getting there with it. I have a long way to go, but I really think I'm heading in the right direction finally. I used to squirl around on high notes...have an uncontrollable random vibrato kind of thing going...and that has since diminished since focusing more on support.

I really think for any kind of high pitched singing, it seems like you need good support to really get the inconsistencies out of there and sound like your voice was meant to sing that high. It's probably not how Bruno does it, I think he just has the range naturally, but for those who don't, you aren't going to get it to that level of power without support.

owen, support is totally independent from the larynx, but applying it, relaxes everthing above so the voice is free.

as time goes on, you will find that you don't have to lighten anything...narrow yes, lighten up....no. support when done right, frees your voice to go where it needs to go, and sound as you intend.

but a certain degree of conditioning and development helps you even more because you can stay expanded down below as you sing, which ultimately retards the diaphragm from returning too fast which makes a huge difference in your sound.

at first this is very tiring, but it gets progressively easier. in the beginning it's tough to get support working where all the rest relaxes...the body seems to want to grip and lock you up in the throat,...but eventually you'll tame this tendency...

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I think the Ken Tamplin video helps answer the nature vs nurture question. Ken is a guy who has clearly put in his 10,000 hours. He sings Grenade very well and it's nice to listen to. It's still not as good as Bruno Mars. He simply has a different voice type that will never quite sound like that.

OTOH I think his cover of Fortunate Son rivals the original. It's written in a range that is really a sweet spot for his voice type.

And Bruno Mars probably has thinner folds and probably can't belt as loud as Tamplin does. Everybody has naturally strong points in their voice, but you can still (and should) train it to do other things as well.

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The thing is if Ken would have used those 10 000 hours to sound like bruno mars he would have... He didnt build his voice towards that sound more of a rocktype sound, still he manages to pull of a great cover.

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He has a light tone to his voice naturally, so he's more "tuned" to be able to sing those notes with ease.

Practice makes perfect.

Stamina

Pitching

Support

Technique

it all depends, you have to draw a line at some point...you can sound a lot of different ways, but at some point you have to accept your own voice.....

it's not the notes, anyone who trains hard and long enough will be able to hit those notes he sings, but within the context of your own voice.

that's why ken tamplin is ken tamplin and bruno mars is bruno mars....and believe me, somewhere out there is a guy who is even lighter than bruno mars and another guy a lot thicker than ken tamplin....

accepting your own voice can be a very difficult thing to deal with. you may have a wonderful sounding voice to others, but not to yourself.

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it all depends, you have to draw a line at some point...you can sound a lot of different ways, but at some point you have to accept your own voice.....

it's not the notes, anyone who trains hard and long enough will be able to hit those notes he sings, but within the context of your own voice.

that's why ken tamplin is ken tamplin and bruno mars is bruno mars....and believe me, somewhere out there is a guy who is even lighter than bruno mars and another guy a lot thicker than ken tamplin....

accepting your own voice can be a very difficult thing to deal with. you may have a wonderful sounding voice to others, but not to yourself.

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D.Star Top Notch.

And I will add, yet again:

Our hearing of musical qualities works on relative values, not absolute. Light and Heavy depends on contrasts. The feel of the song and what the artist is doing is on the choices and the uses of dynamics, and other aspects of the phrasing. Its musical content.

Listen to the work of dynamics in there, how he spreads around a large dynamic range, from low to high, soft to strong. Sure, if you compare it to other voices, overall there is more or less weight, but the core of his work is in there.

Much harder than trying to use the same vocal weight, is having the freedom to use the same interpretation work on this area, and for that, if you try to aim for anything other than your voice free of tampering to "sound" like someone else, it will simply be outside your reach, it will sound like a second hand attempt to mimic Michael Jackson, instead of a work that has obvious influences.

If you work on the same musical ideas, melody, timming and dynamics, you can even break into an obvious falsetto and it will still sound good and in the context of the song.

And thats why on pop classifications are meaningless, you dont have a requirement of tonal quality to fullfill, you just need consistency. You are also free to alter even the melody of the songs.

Free does not mean that any random stuff you do will sound good, thats where musicianship comes in, and why I always recomend to listen to material that has quality with 10 times more attention to capture and understand the details, where the artist chooses to be soft, where is higher, timming divisions and the effect they cause, and so on.

We have awesome free classes on musicianship on pretty much all comercial grade material recorded, listen to it and learn from it. There is much more info in this other than the notes and the lyrics, step out of the karaoke mindset.

The choice you do on a single vowel in the middle of a phrase, to highlight an open or closed one, changes the perceived dynamics of the whole phrase. A note sustained longer gives a stronger perception, shorter makes it lighter.

As you understand and learn, your own perception will improve, and you will be able to apply these ideas on other material, and even your own, without having to "mimic" the sound of an artist.

Its nearly impossible to try to do work on this level ignoring this, unless you are naturally using your voice in this area or you have some good 10 or more years of singing material on the same level of refinement, you will need to pay attention and plan. And I know singers with more experience than this that would still plan very well how they would perform it, to have quality and to preserve your voice.

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Well it depends who you ask if they are good, but they are good to prove My point :) cause they are over the top in regards to range :)

ok did I just here a B7? Dude you've got range!!!!. Which vocal program made you gain all that range? I'm very interested. and how long did it take you to gain that range?

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Nice job D.Starr!

Tried Runaway Baby a few months ago. The notes weren't a problem. The pacing of the tune and how the high notes came all at once, in a row, over and over, killed me. Tried it once live. It was a tough tune and Brunos makes it look easy.

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In our obsession with the passagio we often forget that it's really difficult for a lower-voiced singer to sing in a high tessitura with consistency and endurance. It's one thing to be able to sing one or two high notes, but to be able to sing entire melodies up in head voice with power...even if it's the sweet spot of your head voice, it can still be really difficult. It's an important thing to train how to move around freely up there, but at the same time, important to stay away from when choosing songs or writing original material that you plan to perform live regularly, unless you like to live on the edge. It's really interesting how the mere quantity of head voice or mixed voice parts in a particular song can determine its difficulty. It's partly tiring and also partly a mental thing I think. The further away you get from chest voice the more insecure you're going to feel unless you can find a way to counter that primitive fear. I'm still a bit of a victim of it myself.

THANK YOU x 100 for posting this!

This is exactly what I've been thinking for ages but haven't been able to put it into words. You get all kinds of people saying that fach doesn't matter in pop music and you can sing anything you want but that just isn't the case. A tenor can sing low notes and a bass/bari can sing high notes but they just will not sound the same as each other. Bruno has a naturally high voice so he sounds comfortable up there, like MJ and many singers which we love.

Also it's not only your natural tessitura which is important, but how "easy" it is to sing up there. Of course you can train your stamina and technique and be able to do these things but it is still harder for a lower-voiced man to sing in a "tenor" range consistently, with great tone quality. And finding some already very talented singers (or even yourself) as an example that anyone can sing anything any time... No dice

I agree more than 100%

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Come on guys... dont make it to hard on yourself. Basicly what your stating is highvoices have easyer time singing high thats true... But still there are alot of singers with lowervoicestypes who are better than bruno singing high and staying up high.

most guys on these forums are not lowvoices anyways, sure there are some exeptions but most are highertyped voices who havent got technique down

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Yeah i belive it's a B7, ive done alot of diffrent programs my personal favourites are 4pillars,CVT but ive done loads of other.

It's taken many years i havent counted lol. It's something anyone can get My voice isnt special in anyways like most guys when i started labled as à baritone unable to go above d4

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Hey folks.

Reading this thread gave me the idea of trying one bruno mars song, just to test and ear for myself.

I covered "Locked out of heaven chorus". this song so great but always in the high part of the voice.

Tell me what you think, i think i'm on the good path (i hope)

here's the link of my try

https://www.box.com/s/vhqsb4nwy5r1ac184ttk

and the link of the thread i've created

http://themodernvocalist.punbb-hosting.com/viewtopic.php?id=5802

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What do you consider "tenor" range? If you consider it to be anything above D4/E4, I'm going to have to vehemently disagree with you. I think that any baritone who wants to do contemporary singing can and should be very comfortable singing up to A4 (at least).

Now if you're talking about the range above A4 up to D5 or so, then yea I'd say that's more likely that a tenor will have that in their tessitura than a baritone. Nonetheless, I agree with Jens that a baritone can train those notes to great effect if they want to.

This misconception about voice part vs range happens a lot in musical theater. People are under the impression that composers haven't written lead roles for baritones since Rodgers and Hammerstein and that every lead role is meant for a tenor now. That's not the case at all. It's just that people are writing roles for baritones that go up to G4 and A4.

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Hey folks.

Reading this thread gave me the idea of trying one bruno mars song, just to test and ear for myself.

I covered "Locked out of heaven chorus". this song so great but always in the high part of the voice.

Tell me what you think, i think i'm on the good path (i hope)

here's the link of my try

https://www.box.com/s/vhqsb4nwy5r1ac184ttk

and the link of the thread i've created

http://themodernvocalist.punbb-hosting.com/viewtopic.php?id=5802

I just wrote an answer in that thread of yours :) Great singing man!

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He has a light tone to his voice naturally, so he's more "tuned" to be able to sing those notes with ease.

Practice makes perfect.

Stamina

Pitching

Support

Technique

it all depends, you have to draw a line at some point...you can sound a lot of different ways, but at some point you have to accept your own voice.....

it's not the notes, anyone who trains hard and long enough will be able to hit those notes he sings, but within the context of your own voice.

that's why ken tamplin is ken tamplin and bruno mars is bruno mars....and believe me, somewhere out there is a guy who is even lighter than bruno mars and another guy a lot thicker than ken tamplin....

accepting your own voice can be a very difficult thing to deal with. you may have a wonderful sounding voice to others, but not to yourself.

D.Starr, is that you singing? That's a great singer, whether it's you or someone else :)

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Haha I wish Jonpall.

I like his connected tone. I do like my voice just wish I could connect it up into the second register and get rid of this splatty squeeze.

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