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Baritone - Need help increasing vocal range!

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lisalec
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Hello! I am a 16y/o baritone with a range of G2-D4. I sing a lot of musical theater and classical-pop crossover stuff.I really want to be able to sing up to G4 in my chest register without changing registers. Are there any exercises I could do to increase my vocal range? I want to be able to comfortably hit a G4/A4 without going into mix or head voice. One of my big problems is my larynx rises up every time I get up to middle C. Is there any way I can keep it lowered/stabilized? I have good breathing technique and support, but something is holding me back. Thank you!

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Hello.

First thing Id ask is how did you conclude you are a baritone? A baritonal timbre on 16 yo is something Im yet to hear.

The solution is taking lessons and training, what you want is the same that everyone else wants. There is no easy way.

Yet, you are still young and until your voice is more mature I suggest you take your time, train, sing, but dont stress with range. Its simpler than it feels to be right now (your range is the same I had with your age, Im a tenor).

GL.

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Hello!

I thought I was a baritone because I sing baritone in choir, and because I have a warm full sound/timbre throughout the lower and middle parts of my range. Although I have a lighter tenor like quality to my voice as I get higher (like Michael Buble). Is building up vocal range in the chest register purely something that comes with lots of practice and time?

Thanks for helping me out!

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Oh yes, lets say it comes with "time practicing correctly". :)

But in your case, because of the age, it will probably need a bit of the "normal time" to go by and become more stable, use it to practice and rest assured that with modern training range should not be a concern, what you want is perfectly doable.

Good luck, few tips I can give:

Experiment with your voice, do some weird vocalizes daily, mimic some cartoon voices, funny sounds, just play around. Try to not strain or push, if it hurts stop for the day and you will be fine, it really helps developing coordination, lets say 10 minutes a day.

Sing some easy stuff, everyday, trying to make it sound good and become even more comfortable, until its piece of cake. Dont push range, keep on your comfortable area. Stop working way before you get hoarse.

This does not replace technical training, but will help you when you begin.

GL!

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Lisalec, musical theater enthusiast and baritone here as well. You absolutely can learn to sing up to and beyond A4 and you SHOULD learn to do so if you're interested in musical theater. Often times we baritones think that our voices are incapable of bridging the passaggio and that we have to leave the high stuff for the tenors. That's a bunch of nonsense.

As Felipe said, the quickest way there is with a teacher who knows what they're doing. It costs money, but it's worth the investment. If you don't have the cash at the moment, browse this forum as there's plenty of resources here and links to videos on YouTube that are helpful. E-mail me if you want some more info or recommendations.

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Based on my own experience I feel like 16 is mostly past the point of voice change so there is no use holding back/fearing the training of range extension. Just make sure you listen to your body. When I was your age my voice was a lot weaker, maybe due to age maybe due to lack of training or poor training, but I was still aware of when enough was enough and I had hit my limit. Now I'm 18 and spending over a half hour working on belting the high A is something my voice can handle, and I've extended my chest voice range more this year than any other. But I think its mostly just a result of training, not a whole lot to do with age.

So go for it, but regularly check in with a teacher, a very good one. Don't just push higher and higher, that will only develop the strength for higher notes, not the coordination. Learn the proper technique for extending full voice range from a teacher and you will make gains that translate much better to singing.

Another helpful thing I found is work a lot on songs with melodies that hang around the top of your chest voice range. Not so high you can't sing it, just high enough that you can still do it but its tiring/inconsistent to maintain for a whole song without strain creeping in. So for you, maybe find something with a lot of C4s for instance. Practice those songs a lot, keep tweaking elements of your technique in the pursuit of reducing effort, and eventually those top notes will become easier and you'll be able to be more flexible and comfortable with them and that will open up more range to be developed above that, so then you move on to slightly higher songs, etc.

Lastly, don't neglect the head voice. or light mix or whatever you want to call it. find that coordination and work it hard. Because at your age, post voice change, it tends to be weak or non existent and without developing it you'll find it hard to find release in the upper chest voice. So work the lighter stuff too, you don't have to sing with it, its just coordination building to help you learn how to gradually thin out your voice as you ascend to keep the volume in control and reduce strain

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There are plenty of people who are baritones at 16, but that doesn't rule out the possibility of you being something else. My advice is don't worry about it. As for how to get the high notes, you have to be doing a few things to make that happen. I think most will agree that this will help:

1. Focus on taking a super deep breathe that expands your ribs whilst keeping your chest and shoulders from rising. You should feel it all around like a ring surrounding your body. Breathe low and try to keep it expanded like that as you sing or vocalize, this should help prevent your larynx from rising. If you aren't getting the rib expansion, you need to work on your breathing.

2. Try and get the sound to shoot up to the roof of your mouth. Some people feel it on their teeth, some on their soft palate. As long as you feel your voice shooting to the roof of your mouth and it feels free, you are fine. Experiment with hearty laughter (HA HA HA) whilst doing step one. Try it with different vowels. Once you get it on the roof of the mouth, always try and get that to happen.

3. Work step 1 and 2 together up and down, all around throughout the whole range of your voice.

Good luck!

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This is not a parameter geran. You can find little girls sounding like grown up womans, without seeing how it holds out when all that is relaxed and full projection is used, all you can say is that it sounds like Rob Thomas, thats not a reference to classification.

Classifying a 16yo is a very problematic thing btw, just leave it as "unknown" and work what is important.

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I was never a baritone, not at 16 or 18. Not even one now, though I sometimes have fun faking some "baritonic" notes.

I would get bullied, too, but not because of my womanly voice but because of my shrek size and strength. People more stupid than I was thought that by beating me, the physically largest person on campus, usually taller than the staff, that would make him or them, the "tough" guys. I wore a few of them out.

Anyway, initial question. You are a baritone and wish to sing higher. You can do so. You will have to accept that, just like other voice types, you will be vibrating less mass of the folds for higher notes. (actually, this happens in all singers, trained and untrained, whether they choose to accept it, or not.)

Your path will be to find how best your voice does that.

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That wasn't his point. He said entirely unlocked in under a year.

Well it just isnt that simple because a normalvoice is capable of so many sounds an a very very big range if trained correctly. Even if you have the best coach that unlocks your voice in one year i can promise you that your range will stil grow duribg the next 10-20 years.

Thats atleast how it has been for me and most of the great singers i know... Ive sung for 10 years and got alot of help from great coaches and singers, if i focus on my range it still grows to this day.

It's not something i think, it's something that ive experienced :) listen to singers like mike patton, he's very open to diffrent sounds and experimentation, a range like that is not, i repeat not unlocked in one year, it's probably a decade of singing experimentation and shows if not even more..

Www.youtube.com/#/results?q=mike%20patton%20vocal%20range&sm=1

But i still echo phils post, a great coach is worth all the cash

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Yepp i completly agree with you then :) that area can be unlocked in a year, mastery of that area however is something completly diffrent. Atleast for me that area took a long time before it settled and i still work at it.

Cheers bro

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I doubt anything gets "unlocked". Nothing was "locked" in the first place.

All I envisage is gradual, continuous improvement, as you initially described.

I also don't think the G4-E5 area is the "most important" area of the voice. I can't really make much sense of such a statement.

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I doubt anything gets "unlocked". Nothing was "locked" in the first place.

All I envisage is gradual, continuous improvement, as you initially described.

I also don't think the G4-E5 area is the "most important" area of the voice. I can't really make much sense of such a statement.

It all depends on what type of songs you wish to sing. I can make noise on any pitch between G4 and F5. I don't think that anyone would concider it singing. Usually what people mean by unlocking the voice is making it usable for singing in that area.

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It all depends on what type of songs you wish to sing. I can make noise on any pitch between G4 and F5. I don't think that anyone would concider it singing.

For particular type of music it may be essential. Calling it "the most important" just doesn't make sense to me. The whole range is essential.

Also, you can't give good general advice if, in your heart, you only care about and reference your own preferred genre of music.

Usually what people mean by unlocking the voice is making it usable for singing in that area.

It's a sales pitch. ;)

It is a bad metaphor that is likely to end up disappointing a lot of people who believe it.

The reality is that it takes a lifelong continuous process of practice, patience and gradual progress.

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You are entitled to your opinion. :cool: My own experience proves for me that unlocking is a good term to use.

Many things have been opened over these last few months that had been locked for 20+ years. It is true that I had not been seeking answers in the correct places and my understanding was flawed but areas of my voice were non the less locked.

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New ways of identifying problems was the magic bullet. Better understanding of Vocalises and exercises. Why to do a certain exercise. Follow support for supports sake not worry about pitch when working on breathing. Not worry about breathing when working on Pitch. Being able to understand which is causing the problem. Unlocking the difference between Compression and twang. Don't hold back when the problem is lack of pressure. Do not push when the problem is too much pressure. Stop thinking that something requires effort. Stop thinking that something requires lack of effort.............

The most advice that I recieved from other people over the years was to sing to the back of the room and use more support. At that point support meant sing harder and louder so people would hear you in the back of the room. No one would or could explain it better. Resonance and the proper use of it does better for projecting than yelling. Until someone explains how resonance works, with that advice yelling is the only thing one knows how to do to reach people in the back of the room. Yelling will Lock the voice between D4 and G4 unless you learn how to do it.

Using different harmonic relationships in the voice. I do not fully understand how to tune F1 to H3 but I can now let the over tones in the sound keep consistant with what I want instead of just whatever comes out comes out. I am in charge not the register.

I would call all of that unlocking something even if it is only unlocking my misunderstanding.

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I haven't taken lessons from Phil. To Unlock is still to open up. It does not mean master all possibilities.

Pavarotti's range was surely opened up but I never heard him sing anything other than Opera. Does that mean Country style was locked to him? How about Rock? or even Tuvan? Does that mean he still needed to unlock his range?

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