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How to get fuller/richer sound?

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Singingnewbie
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Consciously lowering the larynx is okay if you do it right, and don't overdo it.

Best advice as always would be to take private lessons with a great vocal teacher. I recommend skype lessons with Rob Lunte or Phil Moufarrege.

Obtaining "rich and full highs" takes months to years to develop and will take even longer if you're self taught or studying with a crummy teacher, so if you can afford it, the smartest thing to do to get there is to make the investment in good training to help speed up the process. Whereas just asking a forum you're get some conflicting and unqualified answers which will make you confused and won't lead you down a direct path to the result you want. Individual attention from a teacher keeps things in focus. And self-study vocal programs are an okay alternative but still not as good as private lessons in my experience.

Anyways, good luck. There is no one secret to it, you just have to train for a while and eventually you'll shape your tone into what you want it to sound like

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What you can also do is to send a clip of your singing and where you want it improved.

To sing like Bruce Dickinson you will learn singing like that safely with a vocal coach. I also tries to learn things myself, and we are sort of teaching ourselves singing becoz we need to listen to our bodies, so a singing teacher is sometimes more of a guidance. They go the knowledge to guide you the right way.

While you lower the larynx, you NEED to remember to keep hold of your twanger. While you lower the larynx, you might wanna keep the vocal cords "forward". For some people, keeping the sound focused into your head cavities might also be a tool. Remember these are only sensations. You cant move the vocal cords forward anywhere. But your mind plays a big part on what it responds to when learning new muscle coordinations related to singing = vocal techniques.

Good luck and keep us updated.

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Yeah, Bruce was self-taught. He started out as a drummer. But he had girlfriend who was in choir and she had a book. So, he read that and a few others and thought, "That's how they do that thing. What can my voice do?" Love that self-confidence. His aim was not to sound like someone else already famous. But, instead, to be known by his own name.

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Thanks everyone, i am used more and more to the patience and persistence idea. The past year-s i was expecting to find the magic advice/pill that will transform me easily and fast. It actually makes sense, everything needs time and effort to achieve a high level of performance, so why would singing differ. I will keep trying and see how it goes!

As for the teacher advice, i understand that a !!!good!!! teacher is the shortest way to go but not the easiest, money is a problem so - for now - i do what i can from observation and help from you - and internet generally.

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Thanks everyone, i am used more and more to the patience and persistence idea. The past year-s i was expecting to find the magic advice/pill that will transform me easily and fast. It actually makes sense, everything needs time and effort to achieve a high level of performance, so why would singing differ. I will keep trying and see how it goes!

As for the teacher advice, i understand that a !!!good!!! teacher is the shortest way to go but not the easiest, money is a problem so - for now - i do what i can from observation and help from you - and internet generally.

Often is the advice to get a teacher, even for one lesson, whatever you can afford because it is quicker. But a number of people do have limitations of funds. So, you can do this on your own, it just takes longer.

For example, the ah vowel sound. Are you actually producing it the way that you should? Hard to tell with words. I can type the letters a and h to spell ah. That does not mean that you or I are producing it correctly. Some who have posted recordings and thought they were doing an ah and it sounded more like aw. How else to correct it if someone who knows how it is supposed to sound does not hear you? Well, you could record and listen to yourself and compare it to a recording of someone doing the sound correctly. It's doable, though it may take longer.

What about physical tensions? You may think you are not tense because you are doing something that has been a habit for decades. But a teacher could physically see you and diagnose the tension and give a simple hint or image to get rid of it. I can type the words "sing without undue tension" but it may mean something different to another person reading those words. Even the word tension draws debate. For some people think that singing with tension that leaves you drained is a desirable thing.

So, you have to watch what others do and make your choices. And yes, the only magic pill is time. But I would say time and doing the right thing for your voice. Even my simplifications for myself are not "magic." While an insight might feel like an "aha!" moment, it still takes time and practice to make it more automatic or just more fully under control. Like the old maxim - "Can you give me directions on how to get to Carnegie Hall?" "Yes. Practice, practice, practice."

And if it seems like work, then I suggest a change in perspective. Though I played football in 9th grade and enjoy it as a spectator sport, I did not have the desire as a teenager to follow a further pursuit in it. I preferred playing my guitar and singing songs. Practicing and playing in my bedroom for 2 or 3 hours? Didn't feel like enough time. Life was something that interrupted music. So, be that guy. Get into the perspective of where "working" on your singing is preferrable to anything else. To where it doesn't feel like work and you only have to stop because it is dinner time, or some other unavoidable schedule thing.

Unless you have an emotional need to prove to your family that it is "work," so that you can justify the energy spent on it. I can't fix your family. Some families cannot be fixed. You just have to decide that singing is for you and that time is not a question of how long it will take you but how much time you can save toward the practice and performance of your craft.

Singing is a way of life, regardless of what your "day job" is.

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