Jump to content

Being sick and vocal cords

Rate this topic


Keith
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is just a very stupid question: When I am sick with a cold, I lose my head voice and mixed voice. I have been getting over a cold for the last 2 weeks, and I just can't seem to kick it 100%. I can sing chest voice just fine. once I need sing a note between F4 and Bb4, unless I belt, my voice flips into falsetto (airy lifeless voice). Since we only have 1 set of vocal folds, why is it that my voice flips instead of bridging? This thing only holds true if I am singing (on a scale of 1-10) between 1 and 6.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get the same thing. I think it is because that mix requires that fine coordination between TA and CT and the cold is inflaming those muscles which totally throw off the coordination. You can sing in TA dominant chest voice no problem and also CT dominate falsetto - but not in-between. That's my unscientific theory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get the same thing. I think it is because that mix requires that fine coordination between TA and CT and the cold is inflaming those muscles which totally throw off the coordination. You can sing in TA dominant chest voice no problem and also CT dominate falsetto - but not in-between. That's my unscientific theory.

Sounds about right

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are your sinuses/nose clogged up from the cold? If you tend to sing with a masky tone in your head voice (which I recall you do), you're likely singing with the soft palate relaxed and some resonance enterring up above it, but the problem with that is then any kind of obstruction up there in the nasal passages will throw off the resonance and make your head voice start doing funky things, so you have to compensate and change to a darker non-masky technique

That's been my experience at least...I'm pretty convinced it has absolutely nothing to do with the vocal folds themselves, because the only vocal things I'd have trouble with during a cold would be a result of unknowingly attempting to let air through the nose (figured this out by doing the nose pinch test a lot)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are your sinuses/nose clogged up from the cold? If you tend to sing with a masky tone in your head voice (which I recall you do), you're likely singing with the soft palate relaxed and some resonance enterring up above it, but the problem with that is then any kind of obstruction up there in the nasal passages will throw off the resonance and make your head voice start doing funky things, so you have to compensate and change to a darker non-masky technique

That's been my experience at least...I'm pretty convinced it has absolutely nothing to do with the vocal folds themselves, because the only vocal things I'd have trouble with during a cold would be a result of unknowingly attempting to let air through the nose (figured this out by doing the nose pinch test a lot)

Yeah, sinus crap and lots of coughing.. But, I haven't been able to sing in like a month :( When I tried today, I was flipping all over the place

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Owen and Gino hit the nail on the head.

I prefer to eat healthy and so I barely ever get sick :-P

I host Karaoke night at a local bar, and there is always some sick guy that uses my mics, then I use my mics, then I get sick lol. Now I have a mic just for me hoping to solve that problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I host Karaoke night at a local bar, and there is always some sick guy that uses my mics, then I use my mics, then I get sick lol. Now I have a mic just for me hoping to solve that problem.

That's tough to guard against, then. I work in a small office, report only to the owners, essentially, limited exposure to the teeming, seething masses of contagion. I get pollen allergies but that's just from living in Texas. Otherwise, i have not had a respiratory infection in over 3 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the larynx was affected its best to just not sing until recovering.

If its just a cold, and you feel its a lack of mobility on the soft palate/clogged, a longer warmup using something that makes it move would surely help.

Alternate Lah Gah/Loo Goo for example, gentle and letting it brake. Or any other exercise that works for you to make the palate adjust, alternating nasal/oral for example.

If its clogged, it will help cleanning and should let you get control of resonance again.

Got me through a lot of times.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ultimate goal is not getting sick, Im not a doctor so I don't know what to advise others to do to stop getting sick so much, but I somehow built a great immune system where literally there has been no more than two days in my several years of singing where i was too sick to sing, so...there is a way. And when you get that reliability its such a blessing for any singer. Highly recommended solution, if possible, rather than trying to learn how to sing while sick (important too but not optimal to have to do much)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To answer Keiths very first question.. when you are sick, your vocal cords swells up, as your vocal cords are muscles and surrounds by other muscle groups around the larynx. You don't nessesarily need to lose your voice or get hoarse, but when we get sick the our bodies fight the whatever you got, and this is why we sometimes have achy bodies.. so when ur vocal cords are swollen, voice gets thicker and thats how we feel that we sing in "chest voice", but really we singing on swollen vocal cords, and need to be careful to not damange em!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...