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'The cry'

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Blameitonthevodka
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Isn't the cry really just a closing down of the back of the throat? Which means you don't have to push as much air?

When I cry, my palate and tongue get closer together, yielding a smaller opening to the mouth.

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that's not ideal. none of those things should change.

I don't agree the throat opening shouldn't change at all. Phil I remember when you showed me a close up of what your tongue does when you go higher, you said it doesn't change, but I noticed it raise very very slightly along with the pitch. That seems right to me. You don't want the tongue to raise way up, just a little bit. I think the goal is pretty similar with the larynx too.

But was Phil thinking "I'm going to raise my tongue on high notes" hell no.

I don't like to think of closing the throat (btw by throat I just mean space between back of tongue and soft palate) , it's the wrong mentality. Because the throat already closes naturally as we go higher. If anything you want to open it more, thus "open throat technique" and whatnot. Even if it doesn't line up with the science, it FEELS to the singer like they are opening their throat more and more as they go higher and the singer's perceived sensation is what really matters in terms of consistently delivering the desired technique.

Also the cry has nothing to do with closing the throat. Now, maybe a kind of bright baby cry with twang would close the throat a bit but again it shouldn't be willed upon, that would just make you do it wrong and cause problems. It should come naturally as a result of doing something else (e.g. going for adding a bit of twangy baby cry quality to your tone).

The singer's cry we all talk about, to me, is a laryngeal thing. I associate it with a certain type of closure that helps steer you away from shouting or falsetto, and connect the registers by blending them in the middle.

I also find vocal fry is a great way of finding that cry sensation that we want. Rob Lunte's cry/fry concept really helps tap it in...start your notes with vocal fry and a crying quality and keep it light...you might find that helps erase the break.

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"Thyroid Tilting

The ability to tilt the thyroid cartilage will give the listener the illusion of “chest voice power”. Tilting will help the singer to bridge to their head voice with pharyngeal and mouth resonance. To achieve ideal conditions and optimum resonance in the head voice, the cords need to stretch (lengthen) and thin. The puppy dog whimper is a good indicator (if you are doing it correctly) as to whether you are tilting well. The cords must stay together as you practise! Too much air will blow the cords apart too much. You should feel this “whimper-like cry” behind your upper teeth or behind the nose. Some describe it as starting at the back of the throat and carrying through the head voice area. Pay attention to making it as buzzy and light as you can. This means you are working the inner edges of the cords. The ability to do this without flipping (cords blowing apart) above your first passagio is very difficult. Master the delicateness of this and you will see your control improve instantly. (Alter your volume to find the balance where you can maintain this sound). Start small and light and achieve control of the detail)."

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Not necessarily. Applying force to increase the tension, and therefore pitch, will result on more or less elongation depending on the level of opposing tensions. Tension only equal displacement/stretch if the resistance against it remains the same,

Part of the problem of the passage...

Still why thinking about this on healthy voice is a mistery to me though, you dont interfere on it directly.

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Geran,

No, to my knowledge you can't tilt the thyroid without changing pitch. If it was possible (Felipe's point) then nothing will happen to the vocal folds and nothing changes. :)

There is more involved in pitch regulation than the width of the vocal folds, varying ammounts of longitudional tension and ellongation can produce the same pitch, changing the quality produced.

And tilting does not correlate exactly to the tension of the vocal folds, which is what regulates the pitch, it does vary it. Tilting in this case considering it a rotational movement, thus with change in width.

If the body of the vocal folds is involved, contraction of the TA muscle will also change F0 in a direct relationship, since the tension of the folds also increase, and TA shortens the folds.

These simple ideas of direct adjustments fail, both for tilting to adjust quality, as for doing this simplistic hard assignment of ellongation = pitch adjustment.

Either you consider the whole, or its of course just wrong.

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There is more involved in pitch regulation than the width of the vocal folds,

The width of the vocal folds has nothing to do with a change in pitch.

varying ammounts of longitudional tension and ellongation can produce the same pitch, changing the quality produced.

Of course, but you can't elongate the vocal folds without creating tension (thyroid tilt) and hence a change in pitch. :)

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Martin - couldn't you theoretically release a little TA when Tilting to reduce tension and thus neutralize the rise in pitch? I don't see that anyone would actually do this, but isn't it theoretically possible?

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