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pronouncing "goog"

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Benns
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hey guys,

This has always been a problem for me. I can do the gee gee exercise on a scale, perfectly but however when it comes to doing the goog goog exercise, my goog's always turn into guegh or guug or something that sounds different from goog. I have tried to slow down the scale so that i manage to pronounce the goog properly but it's like my brain/voice is always ready to differentiate the original pronunciation to something else. It's so annoying.

Any tips, guys?

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you will get the most benefit from this exercise (i.m.o.) if you perform it with a slightly lowered larynx and shade more towards the "oo" vowel. focus on a purely produced "oo" vowel as in "soon" "tune" "goon" "spoon."

g "oo" g.....not g "uh" g...... helped i hoped

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you will get the most benefit from this exercise (i.m.o.) if you perform it with a slightly lowered larynx and shade more towards the "oo" vowel. focus on a purely produced "oo" vowel as in "soon" "tune" "goon" "spoon."

g "oo" g.....not g "uh" g...... helped i hoped

Ah, totally didn't see your reply. Ah, that worked for me (concentrating on the "oo" vowel)!! Thanks for that!

Oh, if i lowered the larynx, wouldn't that make it sound dopey? My teacher has been trying to get me out of sounding dopey when doing my vowel exercises

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there is nothing wrong with sounding that way during this exercise. the "hootiness" is to be expected.

if you do this exercise as i have explained, staying true on the "oo" vowel you will feel your voice slot into your head voice quite nicely. just relax, and allow it up.

and you can also do these in a descending scale....

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there is nothing wrong with sounding that way during this exercise. the "hootiness" is to be expected.

if you do this exercise as i have explained, staying true on the "oo" vowel you will feel your voice slot into your head voice quite nicely. just relax, and allow it up.

and you can also do these in a descending scale....

Thanks for that! I managed to pronouce the "goog" properly, whilst aiming for that "oo" vowel

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If you are avoiding dopey sound, it may not be the best of the ideas to work on oo, ee or similars yet. What did your teacher told you to do?

She said, that i should pronounce "goog" with my normal speaking voice because for quite a long time, when doing the scale , i would do it really dopey..

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I understand.

Well, to bring spoken quality, speak it. But you have to trick your brain.

Speak a phrase that uses it, for example: Have a good day.

But first, just speak naturally, pretend that you are talking with someone, or, really talk to someone and THEN you map what is going on.

After you get the spoken quality mapped, apply it on the scale.

Note however. All closed vowels will trigger this dopeyness that you are trying to let go. So although its an awesome idea, totally openning the oo is not possible (it IS a closed vowel), and you WILL need a certain degree of alteration.

Try working on the open vowels before you go this way, in order to not let the dopeyness come all back... And be patient because this kind of work is not easy... think of it as a vice, it will require your to police yourself for a good while until you let go from the habitual pattern.

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Benns, is your first language German or something else that is northern european? I ask because often is a vowel written with an umlaut which makes it different than, say, a true italian pronunciation of the u letter.

In so many words, "step away from the umlaut."

Easier said than done, because it could have become muscle memory over a lifetime.

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Benns, is your first language German or something else that is northern european? I ask because often is a vowel written with an umlaut which makes it different than, say, a true italian pronunciation of the u letter.

In so many words, "step away from the umlaut."

Easier said than done, because it could have become muscle memory over a lifetime.

My first language is english.

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I understand.

Well, to bring spoken quality, speak it. But you have to trick your brain.

Speak a phrase that uses it, for example: Have a good day.

But first, just speak naturally, pretend that you are talking with someone, or, really talk to someone and THEN you map what is going on.

After you get the spoken quality mapped, apply it on the scale.

Note however. All closed vowels will trigger this dopeyness that you are trying to let go. So although its an awesome idea, totally openning the oo is not possible (it IS a closed vowel), and you WILL need a certain degree of alteration.

Try working on the open vowels before you go this way, in order to not let the dopeyness come all back... And be patient because this kind of work is not easy... think of it as a vice, it will require your to police yourself for a good while until you let go from the habitual pattern.

Ah...speak it and then try and remember the sensation/the way it came out of your mouth/the way it came out when you said it? I am currently trying what you suggested. haha, all this work just one word haha

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My first language is english.

Okay. It could still be a problem. I know a guy with a southern accent and he automatically speaks a as in cat, regardless. The most difficult thing for him, then, is to produce a straight-up ah sound.

But anyway, thanks for correcting my assumptions. I can't win them all, so to speak.

:/

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Okay. It could still be a problem. I know a guy with a southern accent and he automatically speaks a as in cat, regardless. The most difficult thing for him, then, is to produce a straight-up ah sound.

But anyway, thanks for correcting my assumptions. I can't win them all, so to speak.

:/

I believe I can speak on behalf of this southern guy. :D Even when you are aware that there is a problem sometimes it takes someone else to point out what the problem stems from. I believe that when I first started with the Goog excercise I ended up singing "Gag" at the top. Still believing that I was centered on Goog. To me it sounded like goog. :o

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Yes, MDEW, you are the southern guy.

Just like, I had a problem uh because of how I have produced that sound in speach, where I live. Some swear by using the "uh" sound to train. Which led me to a contretemp, because of how we use that sound where I am from. The uh sound pulls the tongue too low and detunes the pitch. And I thought I was the only one until I read Debra Lynn's book and she also advises against using that sound. At least in some early aspects of training.

Just the same, I took a lesson from Glenn Hughes. When I come to a word like "love" that would normally be spoken with an uh sound, I sing it with an oo sound. The meaning of the word is there but I stay tuned up. It's how I did "No Stranger to Love" by Black Sabbath.

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The odd thing about this to me is that whenever I hear of the GOOG and GUG excersices the instruction is to sing them DOPEY. :/ In my case it is needed because of the high larynx problem I have.

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The vocalize itself is not useful outside the context.

Depends on the goal and how its executed.

Sometimes the Goog and Gug excercises are to address Closure problems and Sometimes they are to to address raised larynx problems. It is important to know what your intention is when performing any exercise.

Good point Felipe.

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hi guys,

i'm back again. One thing i noticed is that as i go up the scale to the mid point, i start to lose the pronunciation of the word, whether it's gee or goo or whatever. It's kinda frustrating. I have tried just about everything but nothing has worked. I have tried to ultra slow down the scale but i just end up turning the vowel/word into another word as i reach up the scale. I can now pronounce the words properly when starting the scales but as i move up the scale, i lose control and pronunciation of the word/vowel. :(

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