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Voice Type

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Vyper
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Hello fellow singers!

I have a question about my voice type.

Please just help me understand my voice since its been bugging me for a long time.

I have been to 3 separate vocal teachers which I had classical training in the past 5 years and one of them has classified me as a lyric baritone, one couldnt classify me saying i may be a tenor or a baritone but she said it looks like my voice has a some kind of a "weight" and last of them has classified me as a dramatic tenor. These classifications were made chronologically. So here is some info:

Age: 23

Lowest note: I would say G2 in singing terms (since lower than that becomes croaky and unstable after I warm up) but in the mornings when I talk I have F2 and rarely E2 but those notes disappears through the day which I would say lowest I go is F#2 when I talk.

First passagio: D4

Second passagio: F#4-G4 (it changes but usually I have a break at G4 but it may be because I may be trying to prevent a break at F#4 and pushing my middle register a semitone more)

Tessitura: As for tessitura I feel that I am more comfortable when I am singing high since the sound I produce becomes really strong and I feel much more relaxed and effortless.

So again fellow singers, what is my vocal type?

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Is your goal to sing classical or did you just train in that style? I'm not good with the specific fachs, but based on current range alone you are a baritone and a bit on the higher side of it. But in contemporary music it doesn't really matter, with enough training you could learn to sing tenor repertoire convincingly and possibly some low baritone stuff.

Regarding the classical field, I don't have the credibility to classify you and I think it would require an in-person lesson with a classical teacher anyways. Which you've had. Maybe all those classifications are fairly accurate and just reflected differences in your vocal development as well as how much the teacher is looking ahead to what your voice type would be after a lot of training.

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All my vocal teachers gave me classical training which I think it is a good way to go whether you are singing arias or contemporary music. However I am singing comtemporary myself (but I also enjoy listening operas and sometimes fool around trying to sing some). You may be right about what you said in your last sentence which also crossed my mind few times but still I want to have an exact answer.

My low range resembles a baritones but my passagios are way too high for a baritone (3-4 semitones) so thats what confuses me a lot. So why did you said baritone Owen?

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All my vocal teachers gave me classical training which I think it is a good way to go whether you are singing arias or contemporary music. However I am singing comtemporary myself (but I also enjoy listening operas and sometimes fool around trying to sing some). You may be right about what you said in your last sentence which also crossed my mind few times but still I want to have an exact answer.

My low range resembles a baritones but my passagios are way too high for a baritone (3-4 semitones) so thats what confuses me a lot. So why did you said baritone Owen?

That is where me being uneducated about traditional classification comes in. I'm thinking in terms of not including full head voice as range because so many pop singers don't use full head voice they just belt and then when it's too high that's the end of their range and they flip to falsetto or something similar. Or they bridge by lightening weight instead of shifting resonances which turns the bridge into a laryngeal shift that you can move up and down at will to suit the intensity. Yadayada.

If you can sing in your full voice above that G4 without flipping to get there then I stand corrected and if not, if your teachers have identified your passagi locations in the classical way and what they've determined suggests you can train to bring your full voice higher than that G4 then I stand corrected too...

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Well, that's the problem, Owen. Even classically, there is more than one way to classify a voice by range. One way is where the flip or passagio is. Another is to take the lowest possible sound, regardless of volume and add 2.5 to 3.5 octaves. I like Steven Fraser's idea the best. It is where you have the greatest dynamic control of volume, tone, intensity. And all of that doesn't mean with all dials on eleven. It means the control to go soft and quiet. But the rest of the voice classification would need to include weight or texture.

So, I would say this young man is goosenfrabe.

:D

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In your sound clip, you have a darkness and richness that says to me "baritone," despite the fact that you are pulling those A4's in what sounds like full chest voice.

But...

Tessitura: As for tessitura I feel that I am more comfortable when I am singing high since the sound I produce becomes really strong and I feel much more relaxed and effortless.

So call yourself a dramatic tenor, but don't limit yourself to the label. I don't think you'll find a definitive answer in this forum, as most folks here are not classically-based or inclined to want to pigeon-hole people.

If you're going for operatic roles, the music director may decide for you, but don't let that define you, especially at your age, when your voice is still forming.

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Well first of all Felipe and Dante thanks for sparing your time for listening the record and writing your opinions. However I did not uploaded that sample to get some critics about my singing. I uploaded it to give you an idea about the weight of my voice on some certain notes so that helping to classify my voice would be much easier.

I just chose a song I like and recorded that on one take last night without a proper warm up and with a fatigued voice(I exercised like 4 hours ago before that) besides if I wanted it to sound perfect (to my ears at least) I would have done several takes and edited before I uploaded the sample.

Anyway as to clarify things further I have been practising daily for about 1.5 years and prior to that there was huge gap of time between the times I have taken singing lessons. So probably in 3.5 years I have taken singing lessons for about approximately 6 months. However since the first lesson I had taken was something like 5 years ago I chose to state it like that.

By the way I think I should also indicate that I can access my head resonance and go up more with a mixed voice until E5 and at F5 a break occurs.

So anyway I totally do understand what you mean by try not to classify the voice I have because giving labels limits your capabilities. Further opinions and ideas can help to enchance my vision on my voice or just on the concept of singing but I think I got what I came for so thank you^^

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I just chose a song I like and recorded that on one take last night without a proper warm up and with a fatigued voice(I exercised like 4 hours ago before that) besides if I wanted it to sound perfect (to my ears at least) I would have done several takes and edited before I uploaded the sample.

Anyway as to clarify things further I have been practising daily for about 1.5 years and prior to that there was huge gap of time between the times I have taken singing lessons. So probably in 3.5 years I have taken singing lessons for about approximately 6 months. However since the first lesson I had taken was something like 5 years ago I chose to state it like that.

No excuses. I know, because I used to do that, too. It doesn't matter how tired or energized I was. What time of day or night. Doesn't matter, unless someone expresses a technical gear question what mic or DAW I used. Let your recording stand on its own. Because that is all anyone has to hear of you.

However, from your description, you have more direct experience from learning from a singing teacher than I have had. Which is not saying a lot because I have never had a voice teacher, though I have taken some advice from a voice coach, but it was not structured lessons.

Often is the advice of some members here to get a singing coach. And you have had more than one. So, I would listen to the coach or coaches you have had. Unless they are not accomplishing what you need. And what does it really matter what voice type you are?

Truly, it only matters to a person casting voices for an opera. That is, the "voice type"is more about the material being performed than the actual singer himself. And what if you got typed as spinto. You might sound spinto in one piece and not so much on another.

So, what type of voice do you have? The type of voice to sing what it is you want to sing.

Does it matter that I have been described a few times (by people other than myself) as a high tenor? I can do some songs with low notes and thanks to the magic of editing (but no pitch correction, ask anyone :lol: ) I can get away with because it's a pop song. Or a country song. Or whatever it is that I am doing.

So, next time you go to your teacher or another teacher, let them know what it is you want to sing. Set a goal, work toward that goal. Forget about voice type and weight. If both Phil Anselmo and Rik Emmett can be described as rock singers, so can you, for example.

Peace, love, and understanding.

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