Jump to content

Reinforced Falsetto vs Head voice

Rate this topic


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey all,

I have noticed that tons of teachers market their singing products using "Reinforced Falsetto" which is basically high notes in falsetto that are seemingly powerful but do not connect.

It is LOUD it is twangy.... but it cannot connect to full voice. It is essentially a "pushed falsetto." That is currently what I have.

Let me share my experience with you all, the teacher with the HIGHEST youtube views in my country and tons of youtube views... more than any member/teacher on this forum, uses reinforced falsetto. Although he has tons views on his mixed voice videos is is essentially falsetto belting. It sounds VERY powerful but he personally told me that there will always be a break between falsetto/full voice you just get better at hiding it lol.

I'm starting to believe what he said to me is true.

What are the fundamental differences between this "pushed falsetto" and head voice. How do I get my head voice to connect with power? How can I develop HEADVOICE and not falsetto. Before someone mentions Frisell I do not believe it takes 1 year of falsetto slides to develop head voice and also that s#*t makes my voice "headier" and my style is more belty (think chris brown or MJ).

This is all very confusing. But I am willing to try any exercise and methodology to get this working.

Here is a sample of me sounding like a total idiot but I know you TVS guys love audio samples ;)

https://soundcloud.com/user922239441/falsetto-mixdown

- JayMC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

JayMC... hook up with Jens, he and I do a lot of talking and I really feel confident that he knows how to help you. He is a student of several programs, including Pillars.

In regards to Pillars, I can't help but notice you have 2.0... the 3.0 is now available and it is a completely different program. If 2.0 is helping you that is great, but it pains me to know that you don't have the best I can give you... to help you. The update is $140... and Ill give you the new Mobile Edition as well for your iphone and iPad. Seriously, Im not just trying to get a sale, I really want you to have the best information I can give you and that is not in 2.0... you should consider 3.0 upgrade.

Pillars 3.0 Update: $140:

http://www.thevocaliststudiostore.com/THE-FOUR-PILLARS-OF-SINGING--Upgrade-For-Existing-Clients_p_56.html

I Like Martin's response... LOL... :cool: Martin, you have become the minimalist in your old age I noticed... I like the Minimalist Martin... cool.

Jay, I don't like this "reinforced falsetto" term? It never made sense to me. It sounds like an oxymoron. "Reinforced Falsetto"? So, ... Im going to blow falsetto really hard? LOL!! Its just kinda stupid... Im sorry.

Look Jay... you have to twang. You have to close the vocal folds... as Martin is trying to tell you, you have to abduct the vocal folds in the head voice. Falsetto is a vocal mode.. its the windy sound that comes from an open glottis that we are all typically trying to train away from. Work on the intrinsic musculature inside... work on the twanger. If you want to sound beefy on top... don't do anything "falsetto", unless you are trying to just orient your placement or match pitch. Outside of that, squeeze the damn twanger, tune your larynx, release into a good vowel and get stronger.

Make sure you are modifying to the right vowels through the passaggio... to gain more intrinsic musculature, I advise that you modify to overdrive vowels on top; "eh" and "ae" with a dampened larynx. That is very good medicine for me. I advise that you work on "quack & release onsets" and "messa di voce onsets" ... found in Pillars 3.0 to build strength in the twanger.

"Reinforced Falsetto" is some goofy term that someone came up with (I think I know who, I won't mention any names because I respect this person)... but its still goofy... and then it kinda took hold and now people are using it. Falsetto is falsetto and twang is twang...

Update your Pillars and take three lessons with me and Ill get you on track, promise... OR... contact Jens and let him help you... but clearly "reinforced falsetto" is confusing you and that doesn't surprise me... it always confused me to because there is no such thing... its just some goofy made up term that was created in a popular book by a friend of mine and now people are wrestling with it... its just kinda dumb.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, Jay, I wished you hadn't said that because now, I want to mention Frisell, whether it's applicable or not, just because you set up that barrier. Just kidding.

The problem is in your own words or how you define them. Semantics can be a slippery slope.

So, you say that some guy in your country, who has more youtube views for his stuff than anyone here says there is always a switch and that he uses "reinforced falsetto." And I am assuming that the judgement of many is that he sing well and with power.

And you start out describing this as a falsetto note that is "seemingly powerful." Well, is it? Did it sound powerful? If so, who cares what you call it?

As for head voice, a definition must be agreed upon, which will probably never happen. I am not discounting "reinforced falsetto" but there have also been differing definitions in what is falsetto.

Anyway, so if this guy has more views does that make him more right? More right than anyone here? And are people here supposed to defend differing opinions against his mammoth number of views?

One of the more clear definitions I have read recently of what might be falsetto is that in the very highest of notes, most of the folds are not involved. The aperture of the glottis is not as close as speaking voice and the real strength of the note depends on the purity of resonance. That is, mechanically, it may have been falsetto but sonically or aurally, it sounded "full."

Which leads me back to "seems powerful." Or is it only powerful if you have the same adduction you do while speaking?

It seems your question generated more questions, for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Inside or M2, aren't we really talking about a spectrum of compression? On 100% open glottis you have Falsetto... on 100% compression you have Quack Mode... we calibrate and train different levels of compression in between; 10%, 20%, 25%, 30%, etc...

This year I have come to really appreciate more how important it is to be able to gain command and control over the glottis and the ability to not only compress/contract, but to relax and balance the compression against the sub-glottal respiration pressure... in particular on notes above A4 approximately... In any case, the point is... mastery of glottal abduction and adduction is KEY to being able to so so much with your physiology in singing.

So the first thing to do (Jay...) is to realize that vocal fold compression exists in a spectrum... it not all compressed or all open... When you realize that, the logic stands to reason that the term "reinforced falsetto" is either an oxymoron or it represents an open glottal position with some % of compression.. what % that is ??? ... its just confusing. In the end, you generally want to be compressing, twanging... as I think you already know.

What did the author of the term "Reinforced Falsetto" really mean when he started using it? Are we sure that he didn't really just mean "... make sure your in your head voice by using an open glottal position and then "reinforce' it until you begin to compress (twang)"... Is "reinforced falsetto" just twanging in the head voice?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was honestly just getting ready to post the same topic! :o

Does reinforced falsetto sound similar to the technique Rob Halford used on Painkiller? To me, it sounds almost as if he uses a bit of distorted head voice along with some reinforced falsetto on a few words.

Does reinforced falsetto even exist, or would it be considered a misonomer? (Sorry about the barrage of questions:))

I think it's time for some mythbusting!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay I know what you mean by this reinforced falsetto even though the terminology is kinda whack. Because you say this: "It is LOUD it is twangy.... but it cannot connect to full voice. "

Head voice, on the other hand, does connect to full voice. That's one way to define the terms. So what is step one to connect it?

You start in chest voice and ascend at a light volume and if you can make it up in head voice range with no break, you've succeeded in maintaining a bit of chest musculature with it. You may have to start very light at first.

But that is step one and the only surefire method I've found to avoiding the "reinforced falsetto" trap.

So practice that (it's basically TVS lift up pull back or Phil's light scales or CVT neutral without flageolet) and post us a file when you start to get decent at it.

Once you're able to get that little 5% of chest musculature in with the head and carry it up, you may find you can just swell the sound - crescendo louder from that configuration - and the mix will become more chesty in sound and feel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Jay I know what you mean by this reinforced falsetto even though the terminology is kinda whack. Because you say this: "It is LOUD it is twangy.... but it cannot connect to full voice. "

Head voice, on the other hand, does connect to full voice. That's one way to define the terms. So what is step one to connect it?

You start in chest voice and ascend at a light volume and if you can make it up in head voice range with no break, you've succeeded in maintaining a bit of chest musculature with it. You may have to start very light at first.

But that is step one and the only surefire method I've found to avoiding the "reinforced falsetto" trap.

So practice that (it's basically TVS lift up pull back or Phil's light scales or CVT neutral without flageolet) and post us a file when you start to get decent at it.

Once you're able to get that little 5% of chest musculature in with the head and carry it up, you may find you can just swell the sound - crescendo louder from that configuration - and the mix will become more chesty in sound and feel.

Good "LUPB" advise Owen... I would also say try light Dampen & Release onsets and modify to dampened "Eh"s up to about G4/G#4 and then begin shadings to "Ae" at the 2nd bridge around approx. A4... to just feel good ol'fashion "chestyness" in the head voice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jens.... above A4.. isn't this possibly just TVS Glottal Bleed of 10-15%?

No, it's just a term people use allover the place like headvoice, Jay was smart enough to load a clip of exactly the sound he meant.

Ive heard the term being used by singers/teachers on what i consider:

High belts above C5

When a singer sings light and airy but still i what i consider fullvoice

open fold/closed fold

Curbing(cvt)

Neutral (cvt)

Edge(cvt)

High released sounds and other "sensations"

Ect.

Basicly it's just a term tossed around like anyone else, people just start seeing red whenever they hear the word falsetto is used.

Now we actualy have a clip so we exactly know the sound he means and can help him go from that sound to the sound he wants.

We have already defined what we here on the forum considers falsetto by using sience, but from now and then we will get people who uses the term diffrently.

But in a sense I get the same feelings you do when i hear a term used in a way you,I and others on the forum dont. Im trying very hard to get away from that actualy, as in manysituations(both here,and irl) I find myself more discussing what to call a certain sound then actualy focusing on techniques and real tips on getting to the goodstuff.

Cheers bro

I know for example Jaime vendera uses the term for a very lightly closedfolds whiney but superlightmass setup. Wich is totaly fine as long as the term is given consistency.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I know what you guys are referring to with "reinforced falsetto".

The best way I can describe it is when you reach a point where in order to go higher you need to reconfigure your set up somehow, but instead of doing that you pretty much keep the same set up but now it's much lighter and feels completely disconnected from your full voice.

The thing that differentiates this from what is commonly referred to as falsetto is that it's not airy and weak. It sounds full, albeit lighter than chest voice and has good volume.

It's a very strange light sensation. The best way I can visualize it is like a spirit leaving the body, it just kinda floats out of it and hovers over, but is no longer a part of it.

I personally don't like this setup, it's too light and too disconnected for my liking, though it may fit in certain situation I assume.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reinforced falsetto at 3:21 even better example at 3:49

The teacher basically had me doing weird screams (adding air also) more like the one at 3:49 - although he could sing high and loud he could not connect that sound to his full voice. After that lesson I never went back, have been practicing stuff on my own.

If someone were to try and help Justin Timberlake connect that sound to his full voice what would be the approach? Is it too late for him?

Note: I knew something was wrong when I saw veins popping out of the teachers neck lol same thing applies to JT. I love him to bits as an artist but is he a good technical role model? Probably not :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Reinforced falsetto at 3:21 even better example at 3:49

The teacher basically had me doing weird screams (adding air also) more like the one at 3:49 - although he could sing high and loud he could not connect that sound to his full voice. After that lesson I never went back, have been practicing stuff on my own.

If someone were to try and help Justin Timberlake connect that sound to his full voice what would be the approach? Is it too late for him?

Note: I knew something was wrong when I saw veins popping out of the teachers neck lol same thing applies to JT. I love him to bits as an artist but is he a good technical role model? Probably not :)

You can call that "reinforced falsetto", you can call that Ronald McDonald, you can call that "sing purple", it doesn't matter what you want to call it... In my opinion, that is a vocal mode called, Falsetto. There is nothing special or different about that vocal sound that is not characterized, defined and experienced by many every day to be Falsetto.

In my opinion, he has soul. He can groove... but if you asked him to sing Dream Theater, he would probably shit out in about 5 minutes and call it quits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But in a sense I get the same feelings you do when i hear a term used in a way you,I and others on the forum dont. Im trying very hard to get away from that actualy, as in manysituations(both here,and irl) I find myself more discussing what to call a certain sound then actualy focusing on techniques and real tips on getting to the goodstuff.

That's what I would call some good goosenfrabe.

That the sound is the desired result, not necessarily a fixation on mechanical things, though that can help some people at some time.

I also understand some people need the "mechanical" phase of the training. Patience is a virtue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... You start in chest voice and ascend at a light volume and if you can make it up in head voice range with no break, you've succeeded in maintaining a bit of chest musculature with it. You may have to start very light at first....

I think that a person can read what you wrote and still end up in the trap. I think you need to add something along the lines...

It should not suddenly become easier, like you no longer have to support.

or

It tone at the top should not sound "hollow".

or

The volume should not reduce to 0% at one point (it is possible to exchange the break for no volume during the siren)

Unless you try to follow these tips (or something similar) you might THINK that you've avoided the trap where you really haven't. At least for me I'm really good at singing in the reinforced falsetto and I can siren up into it without a break more or less because I've trained it.

I'm not sure all my tips above are actually correct so make your own list, all I'm saying is that at least I have read advises you like yours and tried it and thought I nailed it when I really didn't. Feel free to complete my list!

Or maybe what I feel as 0% chest is actually the 5% you are talking about?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are trying to compare apples with oranges.

Head Voice is a resonantal adjustment, a technical construct that has mainly didactic puporses, the main quality that defines it is covering, however you can have covered chest voice, so its not just that.

Falsetto, in the way that you are using the term, is a reference to a vibratory pattern, M2 register.

The resonantal adjustment that head voice refers to can be used on M1 or M2, it does not matter. However, the male passage, around E/F4 on most male voices, is done using M1. The passage also involves other aspects, such as ballancing the tonal quality and dealing with habitual tensions.

And again: head voice is a construct with mainly didactic purposes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Oh Glee... let's debate "the many faces of Falsetto"! lol... Im beginning to appreciate Martin's response above... the minimalist approach. Jay, Its Falsetto. If you want that sound, open your glottis, if you don't, twang it. If you want more wind and Falsetto sound color, compress less, if you want more compression sound color, twang more. Vocal fold compression exists on a spectrum. Its not "on/off"... it exists and can be controlled at all levels... THAT is the important point Im making for you. Stop viewing it as "on / off"... compression can "modify" or "shade", just like vowels do. (EX: 0, 5, 10, 15, 20% compression)

Felipe also makes a good point that, there are other constituents (technical components) that should be considered as well such as vowel, larynx manipulation, sub-glottal respiration pressure, embouchure, tongue and even effects and microphone... all contributing to the (TVS) phonation package and its sound color.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...