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Digastric muscle - a myth/fact on singing?

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Ivenado
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I've been working hard from the pass few years trying polishing every aspects in my singing but even today I'm still amaze by all the different views from singing schools and coaches. As many different techniques as ( the inner smiling laugh, similarity with yawning, a narrow mouth when reaching the high notes, the low/neutral larynx, all these muscles supporting in some ways the voice box.....) But the one thing that amaze me the most is that little organ name: digastric muscle. Some schools and coaches emphasize a lot on the importance to relax this muscle ( the only way for some to stretch the CA to it's full length. I've achieved a lot things in my life but this one is a tough dog to tame. Is there any studies that confirm the inter connection from constriction & release facts regarding this muscle on singing.

Thank you

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In my personal experience, I've gotten way more out of my voice by allowing the muscles under the chin to do what they need to do for me to produce the sound I want, which may be quite a bit of tension. As long as it's not so tense you feel pain. I think moderate tension there is fine and seems to help more than it hurts.

Keep it to a minimum, but don't force the tension to disappear completely because it won't...let it do it's thing, the goal is just to tame it.

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Yeah I am at that stage of controlling it to a certain level but beyond that i would have to leave everything behind by becoming a buddhism monk and meditate the rest of my life on the subject.

Thank you

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Instead of myth/fact, think of it as a muscle :P.

Really, meanning that you control it, if its tense and its getting on the way, then its because of something you are doing. What is it? What can you do that has this muscle relaxed? (During voice production of course).

I would play around with finding different ways to open your mouth, using a lower larynx, using a retarded/dopey/yawned voice (these are different references, try each to see how they affect this contraction), make it very forward/nasal, etc. Until you find something that despite being totally useless to sing with gets it relaxed, then compare it against your singing and it may help you getting a reference of what to do/not do.

That if it really is a problem, as in the muscle is too tense/hurting/too high larynx/pressed voice.

You will not sing better because you "relaxed the digastric", and not having worked to do so does not mean that you are not singing properly.

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I don't feel uptight & constrict when I sing on low & high notes. I just feel that pass C5 it gets a bit more contract. I was just wondering if it does really change something because some good schools to my point of view do not enumerate anything on the subject : Ex- UK Vocal Process and others like ( The Singing Zone) do.

There isn't much on the net concerning the digastric muscle so I guess it isn't a necessity.

Than you anyway for the reply.

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I'm not sure it's a necessity, but I think it is good to be aware of. Anything can be a source of tension and the process of voice training is becoming aware of where your tension is coming from. You're right, The Singing Zone recommends keeping it relaxed. So does Seth Riggs. If you feel it locking up above C5 I don't think its a good thing.

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There isn't much on the net concerning the digastric muscle so I guess it isn't a necessity.

Remember that there are several muscles under the chin besides the digastricus. So, when various voice teachers state that tension under the chin is caused by the digastricus, it's overstated. The digastricus is a jaw muscle, so if the problem is indeed the contraction of this specific muscle then you should monitor for jaw tension. :)

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It isn't lock at C5, just a bit more contract than the lower notes. At A5 will be also more contract than C5 but like I said I don't feel any constriction ( means I dont sense fatigue in my vocal chords) at all. I guess if somebody is fully relax over way up C5, I guess is a step ahead.

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Some coaches would say that by keeping this muscle ( anterior/ posterior) as relax as possible would help the voice to it's max. I know that when the false chords are open it does help in opening the voice because you can see it in on "The Constriction & Release " video by Gillyanne Kayes. filmed by the BBC. So I was just wondering if singers like Barbara Streisand, Marya Carey, Pavaroti ... have/had this muscle fully relax when singing in their full range?

Thank you for the info.

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