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How to get a quiet chest/falsetto blend?

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guitar67
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Listen to the beginning of this song. Does anybody have any tips as to how I can get that kind of blend between chest and falsetto that he uses there? I've tried it a bunch but I'm pretty clueless as to how to approach it. Thanks!

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Well, the diaphragm generates the power and energy, much like voltage does with electronics. It's the potential energy. The lungs act like a capacitor. They store the energy and you must push air faster out of the lungs than it can be generated to keep it chesty and low. The opposite is true the other way around. If you want the notes to be tight piercing and high with a lot of power and no breathy sound, you just fill the lungs up faster than you can use the air and it will come out "faster."

The simplest analogy is that the lungs are the resistance to airflow, but they can become negative resistors too, with nothing but air from the chest. The tongue plays an important part too. I need to go through some notes to get my whole vocal system as an electronics device schematic accurate again.

To answer your question, I don't think you are keeping enough air in your lungs and are just using the diaphragm. You need both the diaphragm to pump air and the lungs to slow this down and make it escape slower so it hits the folds correctly.

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listen very slowly and carefully and will hear how he sings off very well set vowels....and how the vowels link and connect with other vowels.

he's right in the passaggio with e4...i would select narrow vowels shades with this song.

i'll bet he drops the key live......... i couldn't find a live version, which is what you want to hear....

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I was going to say, to mix quiet chest and falsetto, you need at least one tablespoon of each, place in a bowl, add a dash cinnamon, a dash of cardamom (finely ground), and a few tablespoons of light sour cream or plain yogurt, whichever is your choice -- wait -- that's part of the ingredients of my wonderful sweet potatos.

Anyway, listen to Phil, for he can also do the heavy versus light thing very well.

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Great, I've been messing around with some of the tips given here and I've found the right place a couple times. It felt really effortless when I got there and felt extremely similar to falsetto, but I could tell there was definitely some chest in there too. So I think I'm on the right track, I'll keep working on it ;)

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Good god people, it's just adding the right amount of resonances. And for the record you need to always use every resonator all the time, even if it is very unpronounced. To argue against that is to argue against greater vocal articulation, more control, more dynamics and eliminating even one resonator is already severely limiting the performance. Yes, that means singing will always be the art of coordinating dozens of movements and your success will depend on your ability to be as expressive and tasteful as possible. That's why really good singers always have a cohesive unique voice, an effortless sound and shocking amount of range for the same voicing.

To me the key to this is quite simple, you use a tiny bit of everything and every single note resonates fully and ends softly resolving through the false folds. I don't care who the singer is, if they choose to disregard any part of their voice the results will be significantly diminished.

The simplest voice you can probably do is starting the note at the diaphragm, hitting the vocal folds with the right amount of acoustic pressure to produce the note needed, adding chest resonance for warmth, following the note through the vocal tract and hitting everything on the way until you have nothing but uniform notes of equal voice quality with everything fully resonating . You do everything at once and the subtle mix of tones determines the dynamics and color of the note. Once you have this sound as a singular function of singing, you mostly have to worry about articulation.

The various tones a lot of singers are famous for are due to years of trial and error them accentuating the best of what their voice can do by emphasizing the more pleasant qualities.

I don't think the infamous chest and head voices even exist as actual technique that serious singers decide to use, but obviously there's no shortage of singers with bad technique, but acceptable tone who work in extremely limited ways and virtually no ability to sing outside of their box that they probably don't know the specifics of.

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