Jump to content

My voice often goes up an octive...

Rate this topic


roycollingwood
 Share

Recommended Posts

I sing around local music clubs, backing myself with a acustic guitar.

My type of music is 'easy' old pop, sam cooke, eyc.

sometimes I am quite good, though I have trouble starting on the correct note, but correct myself after a bar or 2.

my biggest problem, is I seem to try & sing an octive too high, I don't deliberately do, but cant find a way to stop.

Its probably nerves, but I cannot fight it.

Any suggestions?

Roy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is the "perfect storm." You answered your own question, that it's probably nerves. And that you cannot fight it. So, any suggestions we make are doomed to fail. You have already predicted failure. Rather than fight the nerves, sing with them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But Phil, in my experience that is exactly how someone ends up sounding off-key and with sub-par tone unless it's just exact or like you said, spending an asinine amount of time micromanaging every frequency. I can hear myself very slightly ahead of any equipment or anyone else and if I'm using the diaphragm and chest and going all the way through a series of resonators, the fundamental pitch can be judged and slightly corrected from the moment the tactile bass that only the performer experiences hits them. I you can judge the pitch and subconsciously correct it a few milliseconds after you know it's slightly off and learn how to perform this way, your ability to hit accurate notes will only be limited to your inherit ability anyway. Personally if I had to get a song perfect I would record myself doing it line by line and have it autotuned it if necessary and run though it that way

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If what you are talking about is being unsure of the starting pitch and quietly searching for it before you start the song, and then starting an octave higher, the problem is that you are unsure to begin with and are using a soft headvoice to hone in on your starting pitch instead of full voice. I have experience with that. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phil, no offense, but with my method, you can sing any song you want after hearing it once as long as you are sure which pitch you are hearing and again, even you physically make a mistake, it will be corrected automatically once your tactile sensation feels that half a millisecond of disharmony. Remembering the lyrics becomes the only difficult part of singing. That onset before the note is even attacked is not audible, it's strictly there to "test" to see if how much the note needs to be corrected before it is even sung. It's like your singing has a comparator circuit and can fix the pitch before it even happens.

I don't know why this is hard to believe. It's a fact that sound travels through the body much faster below 20hz and brain processes this information very differently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phil, no offense, but with my method, you can sing any song you want after hearing it once as long as you are sure which pitch you are hearing and again, even you physically make a mistake, it will be corrected automatically once your tactile sensation feels that half a millisecond of disharmony. Remembering the lyrics becomes the only difficult part of singing. That onset before the note is even attacked is not audible, it's strictly there to "test" to see if how much the note needs to be corrected before it is even sung. It's like your singing has a comparator circuit and can fix the pitch before it even happens.

I don't know why this is hard to believe. It's a fact that sound travels through the body much faster below 20hz and brain processes this information very differently.

Your body has to have experienced the note and tone first. Believe me I hear the note, I hear the sound. My body wants to use the wrong coordination because I have note FELT the correct coodination for my body to align itself. That is where the training and guidence from someone else comes into play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry, I just had 20 teeth pulled and have to heal. I don't know why, but all of my "work" and the technique I memorized over the years suddenly came back to me once all my rotten teeth were pulled. Bad timing obviously, but maybe I can work through a song or two in the next couple of days if I can get my mind to transcend the pain. I don't know why but my new dentures don't change anything about singing really. It's easier because I don't have to worry about contorting my tongue around to avoid sharp broken teeth.

Soon enough. I've never recorded myself, not even once using my proper technique. It's always been sort of there but not quite, or totally wrong or whatever. There's psychological reasons for me not being able to remember how to do this, mostly it's because when I have I have suffered because I couldn't do it 100% and it messed with my mind working around a tooth problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Soon enough. I've never recorded myself, not even once using my proper technique. It's always been sort of there but not quite, or totally wrong or whatever. There's psychological reasons for me not being able to remember how to do this, mostly it's because when I have I have suffered because I couldn't do it 100% and it messed with my mind working around a tooth problem.

So, the recordings you posted before, those were not you? Or do I misunderstand the phrasing of your statement. And if you had proper technique, why not record that before instead of something that was not your proper technique? I find it confusing.

Anyway, when you state something, it helps to back it up. Once, I made a statement about a sound. Jonpall asked me to post a sample, which I eventually did. And whether I was right or wrong, good or bad, I did as requested.

Another time, Owen was asking for people to contribute sirens. I did, an actual siren, not just a 5 note run in different "registers," as some others had done. Whether mine was good or bad, I answered the request.

I am not the best singer, maybe no better than you or anyone else. But if I say that my low notes sound woofy and someone says, hey, I want to hear what you think is woofy, I would put up a sound sample and another could tell me if it is woofy or not, from his perspective, whether either one of us is right or wrong or both.

But Phil has it right, I think. The idea is to train coordination so that your voice is in the right place and yes, there will be some physical feelings concurrent with it, sympathetic vibrations that are a sign of the right thing happening.

Pitch-correcting yourself in a millisecond doesn't work. For example, a capella. You already need to know the key and intervals. Otherwise, it is a gelatinous mess flopping around like a fish out of water, to mix metaphors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...