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Why are these so difficult to sing?

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Hello everybody,

New member, long time lurker.

This may sound confusing but bear with me for a moment.

I posted 3 songs from an obscure hair metal band called "Blue Tears" which I find quite challenging to sing.

I can sing sing them in full voice but find that doing so in a fully connected voice is very demanding so I drop them several half steps to where I can handle it more comfortably.

The reason I'm baffled by these tracks (and others from this group) is that in all my history of singing (I'm trained), in which I've sung hundreds of songs, I never had to lower a key or compromise full voice configuration, and I regularly sing the most demanding rock-pop songs out there (both male and female songs) and never have issues, but something about these tunes different.

It doesn't sound to me like the vocalist is singing in falsetto, it sounds connected but of course I may be wrong.

These are demos, no HQ versions were ever recorded. I couldn't find any live versions.

Look forward to hearing what you think...

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I don't know why the Youtube linking didn't work, that's usually how it's done on other forums, sorry.

when you copy and paste a youtube link to here to use the youtube feature, get rid of the "s" in https://whatever. It should read http:// whatever. That 's' wreaks havoc with the embed function.

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without hearing you sing......one of the possible reasons you are finding these songs challenging is a lot of the notes sit right in the passaggio, which means more finesse and balance are required. you are mixing and moving between registers....handing it off to head voice at times and dropping back down into chest at other times.

the resonance has to shifting smoothly while a tug of war is going on....lol!!!

these notes don't have to be very high to be challenging.

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I guess I should have clarified better: It's not that I can't sing them or have issues with certain phrases or parts, I can perform them start to finish just fine, it's just that I find them more challenging than other commonly considered challenging songs and I can't understand why.

I'm not good at figuring out what the range of a song is on the keyboard like others are, but I feel that these songs are abnormally high, much more so than the standard "difficult" rock-pop fair be it male or female songs, but maybe it's something else, I really don't know.

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All songs are challenging. Some in different ways than others. Some have a high run with articulation. Others cover a gigantor range and where you initiate the phrase can make you or break you, even in an easy part of the range. Every song takes skill, even the ones that you or anyone else here think are "easy."

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sing,

this difficulty with some songs and not with others has always intrigued me too.

for me it's foreigner and kansas tunes.....they are challenging for me and remain a challenge. in a recent interview with lou gramm he actually spoke about how singing those songs tests his vocal ability.

one of the biggest factors i've found that can make a song difficult is the tessitura (where the predominant notes sit)...

from the britannica encyclopedia....

tessitura, (Italian: “texture”), in music, the general range of pitches found in a melody or vocal part. It differs from the compass of a piece to the extent that it does not take into account the extremes of the piece’s range but is concerned with the way in which the vocal line is arranged or situated. The tessitura of a piece, therefore, is not determined by a few isolated notes of extraordinarily high or low pitch but rather by which part of the range is most consistently used; for example, the role of Siegfried in Wagner’s Ring operas extends from c♯ to c″, but its tessitura would be considered extremely high (and consequently very demanding) because the tenor is frequently required to sing long phrases in the range c′ to a′. Added to the strain of singing in such a high tessitura is the full volume and dramatic intensity often required for such parts.

hope this helps. like dan says...most songs are challenging in one way or another.

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no, all i'm saying is we can't really tell anything without hearing the singer. he said he can sing the songs, which must mean he can hit the notes, but they are challenging for him.

i'm telling him that one of the reasons might be the tessitura or the way he wants to sound singing them.

it's like with me, i can sail through a bon jovi song, but i'll have a harder time with foreigner, even if i lower the key.

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i'll try again....here's mickey thomas....his voice sits high...he's probably more comfortable up high then when he has to drop lower as you can see if you watch this video.

32:50 to the end on that song.....you can sense he's much more comfortable up than when he has to drop for the verses, because singers like this generally have weaker mids and lows.

for another singer staying up in that range, living up high like he does (that tessitura) can be very difficult.

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yep, one could have 5 octaves of whistle/pianissimo/head/neutral, but that doesnt mean you will be able to belt overdrive in the 4th octave or curbing in the 5th, but as you see, it's still about the range :)

It's individual... I have an easyer time singing B4-C5 in curbing(belt) than in MLN

The modes are not graded like you say

metallic = harder to do

neutral =easyer to do

just because they are like that for you dont mean thats the case for all. some singers have alot easyer for metallic sounds cant sing in neutral at all, for others it's the other way around.

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i'll try again....here's mickey thomas....his voice sits high...he's probably more comfortable up high then when he has to drop lower as you can see if you watch this video.

32:50 to the end on that song.....you can sense he's much more comfortable up than when he has to drop for the verses, because singers like this generally have weaker mids and lows.

for another singer staying up in that range, living up high like he does (that tessitura) can be very difficult.

Hmmm, some great vocals there. Thanks for posting that Bob :)

...in addition to that, the guitar player is playing some of the more tasteful solos I've heard for a while. He's just awesome! I love his playing.

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i'll try again....here's mickey thomas....his voice sits high...he's probably more comfortable up high then when he has to drop lower as you can see if you watch this video.

32:50 to the end on that song.....you can sense he's much more comfortable up than when he has to drop for the verses, because singers like this generally have weaker mids and lows.

for another singer staying up in that range, living up high like he does (that tessitura) can be very difficult.

Bob "singers like this"? i haven't listened to the clip but since you don't know what kind of schedule he has had,or day or gig, why do you blame his problem areas on "some singers have weaker mids and lows."

I've seen him have great lows and mids. You can't blame a night or some youtube videos on the singers technique especially when they are MICKEY THOMAS...he could fart sing better than most good singers...

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okay i agree with you in this one, because i have felt this, and this is not about voice type, it is about technique, if you place your voice high (for example by doing lots of descending exercises) you will feel that the high notes are more released, but you will increasingly feel the lows less powerful, i feel this lately more and more frecuently, when im warmed up my lows really start to suck around F2-F#2 when going down, and i have to really focus to reach the 1st octave in edge (this in exchange for being able to hit A4-C5 in curbing), and on the other hand in the morning i am able to easily go down to G1 in edge, and all the B1-F2 area is huge, but if i try to go higher than lets say D#4, i start to gradually tense, and i can force a G4, but... you get the idea, the voice tends to be placed, low in the morning, and then you can choose to change this to a higher and higher placement but you loose power on the lows, it has only been a few rare days in which, i kinda started vocalising in the afternoon and my voice was immediately ready in the high notes (muscle memory maybe?) and as i didnt warmed up, i DIDNT loose the power on the low notes, really weird...

but going back to the point, the common thing is what you say, we can choose to place the voice in the range we choose, but, i still doubt this will be relevant in 1 semitone difference (B4-C5), what you say with the video you posted is more about the whole range (being able to freely use the high range, and not the same freedom in the low range), but well we are just spinning in circles videohere, we both know that we know (my excellent english!) what we are talking about here xd

Not to derail the thread, but lately Geran you seem to really understand your voice a lot better...have you been seeing a coach, or training a lot?

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G1? That could be useful as a strohbass or schwarzbass. A rarity, a thing of beauty and it should be conserved and treasured by everyone.

It seems a lot of people are chasing the 5th octave but low, foundation-rattling voices are equally as awesome, in my opinion.

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