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Posterior Adduction Help (How to shorten folds)

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Shifty_eyes
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Hey guys,

Ive recently read the book "Can you sing a high C without straining" by Thomas Appell-

I have also had one online skype lesson with him-

I am struggling to sing a Bb4 Arpeggio and keep breaking. I did my lesson with him 10 days ago now, and have practiced his range extending exercise for 8 of those days now (Hour practice).

After two days practice I was able to sing a A4 (from Ab4) but am now stuck.

The exercise involves:

- Taking a deep abdominal breath

- Make the ribcage feel like its compressing into the abdominals

- Tilt your neck/head up slightly and sing arpeggio

- "Make it feel as if the back of your neck is closing up" - Posterior Adduction he calls it- I need to shorten my vocal folds but have no idea how to "close the back of my neck".

Heres a short clip of me breaking into a heady pharyngal sound on the second arpeggio

https://app.box.com/s/raidsxb1twgr0a2qt14s

P.S- Thomas Appell suggested to me that I needed to tense my abdomen ANYTIME I am singing, I do not doubt the guy- he successfully trains singers to these high notes but I have been training with SLS and it seems much more comfortable and "works".

Thanks- sorry for the long post

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I understand your question-

He is using the analogy of a guitar string-

Shorten the vibrating length of the string and the pitch will increase

Also zipping up of the vocal folds from the back in affect shortening them?

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You don't actually shorten the folds for higher pitches, its a visualization, if if doesn't help you, ignore it and find something else. Personally I prefer the visualization of the folds thinning out for higher pitches which isn't totally accurate either but its close and gets the job done. fo' ME, dawg...:lol

Also good job with your practice, keep up the work and you will really go places! It's so refreshing to see someone actually mention the exact amount of work they actually put in. That being said, this stuff usually takes much longer than a week to get down perfectly even with consistent practice, so don't fret.

Be careful not to misinterpret what he says, I get the sense this guy tends to overemphasize concepts a bit ...keep it subtle, things like the ab tensing and tightening the back of the neck, if done too extremely can definitely cause more problems than solve them.

Don't be afraid to experiment a little bit. Try to follow his directions exactly for the most part but dont hesitate to play around with the variables, more of this tension less of that, and you might find the balance that works best for you quicker.

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you should know that in many cases a b4 can be more challenging than a c5.

one of the best ways to get to this note is to adjust to a narrower vowel such as a "uh" as in "book" or "oo" as in "clue."

when you use a vowel to narrow the throat shape you allow a release into your head voice...you don't want to bring up weight and chest voice by using too wide a vowel....this will lock you up, and keep you in chest voice which will make going up next to impossible.

the vowel (or vowel modification) for this note is critical to your success. when you hit it right, you will likely sense the voice releasing into a "space" in the back of your throat.

and i would ask appell for more clarification on this:

"Make it feel as if the back of your neck is closing up" - (that doesn't sound right to me.)

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I understand your question-

He is using the analogy of a guitar string-

Shorten the vibrating length of the string and the pitch will increase

Also zipping up of the vocal folds from the back in affect shortening them?

This.

While I highly respect Thomas Appell and he is considered a pioneer in the field of voice pedagogy, his teachings include old concepts that have now been proven false. Studies have shown that the vocal folds do not zip up as previously thought.

Like Bob said, ask him to clarify.

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i dont understand what you are asking here videohere xd

but maybe now you will get the idea: if you sing B4 in curbing, it will be more difficult than C5 in neutral :)

No... Thats individual.

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