Jump to content

legato

Rate this topic


bigmike092
 Share

Recommended Posts

a few weeks ago i was singing while my friend played guitar, and he told me i need more legato though he didn't use that term. he basically said to achieve that i need to not fully pronounce the words, kind of like slurring a little bit.

i know other things go into play like proper breath support, but is true about what the slurring? and while were at it what exactly is legato, is it simply a smooth flowing sung line?

also i heard legato is more important to classical music than say modern rock, so how much of it is in todays. for example this song

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CydL91xZak

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes, legato is smooth, flowing, continuous tone production as opposed to staccato which is short, detached, tone production.

a good singer needs to be adept at both.

what i think your friend is saying you are probably placing too much emphasis on the consonants.

it helps to remember......the voice rides on vowels (throat shapes). vowels promote breath flow, while consonants interrupt or impede breath flow.

you have to be able to look at a lyric and extract the core vowel sounds and deemphasize the consonants (in most cases) when you sing.

sometimes you have to see where the consonants lie in the lyrics as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Legatto is a musical figure that means reducing the articulation between notes, making the transition continuous. In instruments, it means that the attack is done in such a way to create an illusion of flow, as if one note was connected to the other. Some instruments that are not built using equal temperament can produce it, like violins and the human voice, some have to do so by controlling the attack and release of notes, like on the piano.

On the voice however, it means more. First because the figures of expression come first and foremost from the spoken and sang language. Legatto is in many ways, what we do when we sing

, and also what we expect to hear.

On the technical aspect, it could be said to be "slurring" the vowels, but thats not such a great way to look at it, since it can compromise quality and clarity.

Think of it as a common ground that all vowels will share, and a reduction on the ammount of changes you do to articulate them. Also the constant and stable emission during the production.

All singing has some of it, on classical, specially on Bel Canto interpretation ideals, it is crucial. On other styles, its a big deal of what is perceived as beauty, not a requirement but its there too.

You can also enforce legatto on the same way you do on an instrument, making the notes very connected and reducing the emphasys/attacks as you sing. But you dont need to have it so on the face of the listenner all the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

phil could better answer, but he has been helping me make my tone smoother which im guessing is actually helping my tone contain more legato?

anyways, so your still articulating clearly just not as much as when your talking?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

when you go high up in your range how you sing and shape the vowels takes precedence over pronunciation....

that doesn't mean you don't have to worry about being understood, but the audience's minds will perceive your words.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phil, phil, always phil .... just kidding.

But I read something interesting the other day. A good example of a modern rock singer with a good sense of legato is Chris Cornell. He goes easy on the consonants, long on the vowels.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...