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Rholland906

Recurring problem with volume and headroom please help

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I am a singer in a cover band and unfortunately I am not as loud as most cover band singers. I have recently joined a new band and the guitarist plays very loud. I am having problems with feedback if they turn me up loud enough to sing over the guitar and drums. We rent out the place we play, so I am not comfortable altering the soundboard too much. The other guys in the band have no problem being heard. Just me. Does anyone know of a device I could bring in and simply add it in line to the microphone that would boost or amplify my voice? I have a TChelicon voice live two. It allows for volume increase but causes feedback as well. I am not sure that it acts as an amplifier. I am using a SM 58 Beta microphone. Any help would be appreciated as I threw my voice out last practice trying to scream over them.

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I am a singing bass player and know well what guitarist can be like, tc heicon products while being good are also very prone to feedback. I know because i have a voice live rack, you could try a number of things to help get more volume. First port of call would be the mic you use, i have around twenty mics so i think i have a bit of experience over what works. One of my mics is the beta58 and while a good mic is average at feedback rejection, three mics in my collection which have served me well with enthusiastic guitarists are these. Beyer tgx 60 or an ev n/d767a or an ev pl80 if you dont have one a feedback destroyer is helpfull in pushing up the dbs, i have a few but my favorite is the dbx afs224 if you can find one. Finally the simplest and cheapest method wear ear plugs, sounds crazy but it works keeps the band out and you can hear your voice through the bones in your skull. If you can hear what your singing and the band dont care why should you? many of us have been where you are good luck.

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Thanks for the info on the mics. I will try them. I have tried the Feedback Destroyer Pro once and it didn't help. I would just like to have a device that would allow me to control my volume without depending on the person controlling the board. Which is the bass player in this band if we are running our own sound. And I agree on the earplugs, which I forgot last practice. I will bring my in ear monitor next time. Thanks again.

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Your best bet is a hot, super-cardioid, dynamic mic. The EV N/D 767a works great at $130. The EV N/D967 at $150 is another.

Oops, I see that you're already using a super-cardioid dynamic. Hmm... well, my Driverack works great at chasing feedback (and the price dropped recently).

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Being a supercardioid does not guarantee good rejection of unwanted sounds. Being hot means absolutely nothing - gain is gain, whether it comes from the mic or the preamp. The 767a is a good choice, but the OM7 is what you need. The preamp has to be cranked, but the OM7 has the best rejection of any mic I'm aware of.

But of course the real problem is that everyone else is TFL.

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I know this is an old thread but is this resolved?  If not, how is your mic placed in relation to all the pa speakers and or monitors in the room?  Beta 58 is a supercardoid pattern to the best feedback rejection is technically not exactly the same as for standard cardoid (ie sm58) mic.  Are you right up against wall(s) with reflective surfaces? If so, the sound from speaker(s) even if properly aligned with mic to prevent feedback in ordinary situation could be getting feedback loop from the sound bouncing off the wall and back into the mic.  If there isn't much room, perhaps some acoustical treatment might help a little.

The mic placement would be the 1st thing i'd check. Also, the input gain and eq on your mic channel.  If you don't have as naturally loud voice as the others you may need input gain set a little higher as opposed to cranking the channel volume for you higher.

Other suggestions (which may or not be/been applicable in this situation: Make sure you are right up on the mic which i know can be sometimes be tough especially when playing guitar(for example) at the same time. Also, you don't happen to have lot of reverb on your channel  in the monitors?  If so, try turning it either way back or off in the monitors would help reducing feedback as well along with help you hear your voice more clearly. Especially if the feedback is low frequency in nature, if you have option for hi pass filter for the vocal channels, that may help.  If only vocals are going in the pa and there is no hi pass, if there is a master eq section with something various bands of ed, dialing down the very low eq can help too (especially anything below 75hz)

 

 

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