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Necessary to Master C2-C4 Before Anything Else

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Hey guys, this is honestly a personal question because for me as well as most people it feels cool to just rush into that D4-D5 area. WOOOO high notes!!!

My question is... do you feel it NECESSARY to master C2-C4 before the rest of your voice (or wherever your low notes are). If yes please state why, if no please state why. No scientific explanation is needed, just your personal opinions, beliefs, and experiences :) Bonus: what would be a way to obtain mastery of this area? I heard that learning closure from chest voice is wrong because it feels like "hands clapping" yet working falsetto too much really messed up my voice!!!

Now for the people that are saying YES - what songs are fun to sing in that area? One thing I've noticed (thanks to Jens) is practicing lower songs and trying to nail them REVEALS almost all vocal problems quite effectively and even improves my speaking voice big time.

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What, like, sing well (loud, resonant, with control) in the higher register and so-so (less control, muddier tone) in the low/low-mids?

...How does that work?

I do enjoy the sense of release you get from singing overall higher songs. Wheel in the Sky, for example, I sing with a Robert Plant-type of pure headvoice configuration. Like the album version. Perry sings it a lot different live, though, and it sounds a lot better in my opinion.

So yeah, singing higher, if manageable and comfortable, is much more fun than singing low-mid range.

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JayMC, Sing :D :cool: Pick any of the songs that YOU sing that are in the range of C2 to E4 Sing them. If you notice problems, Work on them. Better yet, If you notice things that are way cool and feel right to you, Do that some more.

If you work Falsetto to death you can cause imbalance in the lower range. If you work Lower range to death you cause imbalance in the higher range. You need to work both. But mainly Sing songs that you enjoy.

Whether it is RnB, Rock n Roll, Musical Theater or Classic You will use any number of different ranges and styles sometimes even during one song. Mastering a scale in one way or the other only achieves mastery of that scale in that style. Sing as if no one is listening. :)

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Is it necessary to be able to catch and throw a ball before you play baseball? Practice getting the range in order with your scales and exercises.. Yes go sing what you want and what you can handle or not. Nothing wrong with testing the grounds, but in vocalise practice nail everything perfect and if that means only up to c4 in full voice then practice that perfect. Go ahead and let yourself siren and stretch but don't pull and wreck yourself before you begin to sing songs it defeats the purpose.

Check your ego don't fool yourself, no one can do that but you...

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Daniel is lying, everyone knows you should skip the C2-C4 range... HIghnotes are the most important!

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jay, are you writing a book? (lol)

i seriously doubt working falsetto, and by that i mean isolating it, if you did it correctly, and in conjunction with other exercises, messed up your voice.

work the whole range with traditional scales work it up, and work it down...you'll grow.

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back to serious. Building your foundation and lowrange is key, if you cant sing a low song good and strong and make it intresting you wont be able to do so with a high song either. Especially if highsinging is not your affinity.

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I have found that singing lower keyed songs is just as challenging as high-ranged songs. Nothing is easy or too difficult. You still need pitch accuracy, breath management, good resonance and tone. For me, some of the lowest notes I have made took as much concentration and management of breath as anything else I did.

Work the whole voice at once. It is not like bodybuilding, where the smart guy works his lower body one day, upper the next, to allow the resting of muscles for 48 hours. And it is best to warm up in the middle of your voice. Then work the higher and then the lower.

To have the one voice, you must want the one voice, and then work for the one voice. Unless you don't want one voice. Decide what it is that you want and work for that.

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Well, to me the basic foundation to any good singing is definitely "connecting". And for that it is neccessary that you don't stay completely in the low range in the beginning. However, you should not shoot too high either.

If you always train below the passaggio chances are that you develop a very dominant and very heavy chest voice and you will have a really hard time stretching that voice later to go for the higher notes. Thus, in my opinion you should work on strength and stretching both in the beginning. So you always go slightly over the passaggio and back down. I think Robert Luntes strategy with a lot of sirens to a low head voice note (G4 mostly) and back down is really good for the start.

There is also no danger in using falsetto as a tool to learn the stretching of the voice. It just has to be done correctly. For example by starting above the passaggio in falsetto, then slide down as low as you can and then make a new onset with that vocal tract setting but with a more activated chest voice. This strengthens and stretches the voice at the same time.

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Wait a minute.

C2?

Two octaves below middle C?

How do you work on that? I can't come close to singing that note, even first thing in the morning.

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Wait a minute.

C2?

Two octaves below middle C?

How do you work on that? I can't come close to singing that note, even first thing in the morning.

In my opinion, generally people don't work their low range with the level of effort and focus of that of the high range. Therefore if your lowest notes are actually E2 or something eventually with focus you can eventually go lower. It's still worth working in my opinion :)

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geran how did you train your low range?

btw i don't believe it's necessary to train the crap out of the low range if your only goal is to sing high. but you should have your comfortable range down first

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What geran describe works well for getting the low notes on an acceptable volume. Personally, I don't like the sound of pure edge on the low notes, though. Sounds too compressed and too different compared to your normally compressed chest voice in my ears (which is mostly overdrive or neutral as a male).

To go down there with quality it is essential that you can twang heavily, but at the same time lower your larynx as much as possible, to not get too compressed. If you get too compressed it will sound more like speaking and not like singing anymore.

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Wait a minute.

C2?

Two octaves below middle C?

How do you work on that? I can't come close to singing that note, even first thing in the morning.

Tim, I have a fairly low voice and I can't either. I got down to a Db2 once early in the morning but it's not exactly a viable note. I suppose I could practice growling out a few more semitones down there, but it's not really useful.

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@Jens, I'm sorry for the loaft man - just so busy with university right now, summer courses are super-compressed.

Case story:

I was practicing some low rap song (kind of singing it) around E2 area -> if I sing too much in this range it becomes very taxing and I can feel all sorts of tension come around. But I stuck to it, made sure was very focused on expression the words in the song. Also mixed in some "vvv" or "zzz" to remind myself its easy!

Then after like 20 minutes of some good solid singing in the lower range.... I tried some "woop" woop and guess what... i sang a G5 in falsetto (never could get that high)... it didn't hurt or anything . I kind of applied the feeling of low range :D

The point of this thread is to ask how critical low range is... but like Jens said especially if you do not have affinity for natural high range -> this is even MORE critical.

I'm starting to believe this is 100% true. I literally could feel a connection between singing that rap song EASILY and hitting that G5 easily.

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And what I have found is that the attention to things like breath management, resonance, are important at E4, E5, and E2. There is no easy or difficult singing. It is all singing, and I know that sounds rather "zen" and I can't help it. Other than to say that all the things we do for singing should be active and engaged, regardless of the part of the range we are singing.

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Yeah IDK, See my story is this. When I was prepubescent at 17 my voice started to change. my range then was b2-c6. the notes around middle C were so easy and fun. then when my voice changed my range went to around C2-F6 however, I could not sing one stinking note, C4. I tried it in my chest which I can, but it really hurts, I tried my head and its so weak. Im really struggling as a baritone and no one belives me cause of my medium voice to sing bass. I think its starting to change again right now! 

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