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Jabroni

Condenser VS. Dynamic?

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What are the differences? I heard that mainly condenser mics are for studio settings while dynamic mics are for live settings.

 

Is it generally the case that condensers are more expensive than dynamic mics? I see the Rode K2 is around $700. Most dynamic mics don't come close to that high price.

 

I currently own a TC Helicon MP 75, since it was the most cost-effective mic when I bought it (came with the Mic Mechanic pedal).

 

What condenser mics would you recommend?

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I have recorded with both, and my take is that for good condenser mics, compared to dynamic mics:

 

pros: wider frequency range and more sensitive (they hear more detail)

 

cons: are more fragile, and (mostly) require phantom power, which in turns just means using a pre-amp that can provide it.

 

 

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Hi George, I still don't know which is better for a home studio recording (I'm struggling to build one). I have preamp with Phantom Power and dynamic microphones. The result is still so bad, humming like permanent whistle. I can fix that with Adobe Audition, but I'm expecting no 'double work' just to record a song idea. If there's a way to use just dynamic mic with good result..?

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What are the differences? I heard that mainly condenser mics are for studio settings while dynamic mics are for live settings.

 

Is it generally the case that condensers are more expensive than dynamic mics? I see the Rode K2 is around $700. Most dynamic mics don't come close to that high price.

 

I currently own a TC Helicon MP 75, since it was the most cost-effective mic when I bought it (came with the Mic Mechanic pedal).

 

What condenser mics would you recommend?

Hi Jabroni, now a days there are some "hand-held" condenser mics for live performance that are supposed to kick some ss. I don't know about the prices, though. But I would assume they are more expensive than standard dynamics (e.g. SM58). I own an old cheap Behringer large diaphragm condenser (B2), and I really like how my voice sounds through it. For more quiet/sensitive (non-screaming) vocals is a killer. But it also sounds super nice on rock vocals. But I use it only in my home studio for recording.

How do you like the MP75 and the Mic Mechanic? What kind of music do you sing with them?

Cheers

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Hi George, I still don't know which is better for a home studio recording (I'm struggling to build one). I have preamp with Phantom Power and dynamic microphones. The result is still so bad, humming like permanent whistle. I can fix that with Adobe Audition, but I'm expecting no 'double work' just to record a song idea. If there's a way to use just dynamic mic with good result..?

Hi Ronald, which dynamic mics do you already own, that are giving you trouble? In my home studio I have a few Shure (PG58, PG57), Audio Tecnica (don't remember the models), a large diaphragm condenser (Behringer B2 - I love it), and my recent acquisition, a Senheiser E835, which I'm loving very much. Bottom line is: you should not have problems with your microphones just because they are dynamic. Maybe you should look into setting the input/trim levels before recording, and never let the levels peak red during recording. You may be recording the vocals at too low levels, and then you have to pump the volume up, and you get all the noise as well. Cheers

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It's very feasible to create a home studio with a condensor mic and achieve great quality results fairly cheaply.

 

My home studio I  have a large diaphragm condensor (http://www.mxlmics.com/microphones/studio/2001/), which goes through a solid-state analogue pre-amp which also suplies phantom power (http://www.m-s-v.eu/ebizz/sh/a_einzel.aspx?SP=2&ANR=LH-045&lc=EU), into my PC with a reaosnably good sound card (http://www.m-audio.com/products/view/audiophile-2496). like you, I use Adobe Audition to record.

 

I don't get any whistle or hum or anything odd going on - it's a clean as a whistle. Maybe one item in your chain is faulty or wired wrong? is it a mains hum? earthing problems?

 

I have used the same setup to record with a dynamic mic, Sennheiser E845s, but the recorded results weren't as crisp as with the condensor mic. With the dynamic mic you turn off the phantom power, whereas it's on for the condensor (as it needs an internal voltage to work)

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You may be recording the vocals at too low levels, and then you have to pump the volume up, and you get all the noise as well.

 

you right, I thought the mic not send the signal strong enough, it produces low volume, and when I normalized the track the annoying sound get louder too. the mics are aiwa.. 

 

Maybe one item in your chain is faulty or wired wrong? is it a mains hum? earthing problems?

 

earthing problems! will investigate that.

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What I have learned about recording is that you may change mics depending on what you are recording. Loud instruments such as a guitar or bass amp, or a drum set may be mic'd with dynamics because those can withstand higher SPL (sound pressure level.)

 

A singer should only use a dynamic in the studio if they are very loud. Or the song is to be sung loud.

 

Mostly, I use my studio condenser mic for singing and sometimes for the acoustic guitar. Other times, I will jack the acoustic right into the interface. It is a Spectrum with built-in pick-ups, 3 band eq, and volume.

 

Another way I like to think of it as that condenser mics pick more room sound, dynamics pick up less room sound. So, if your instrument or voice is in a large room, you will probably use condenser mic.

 

And so, probably the next thing I will get is a better grade of condenser mic.

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Dynamic mics are less susceptible to clipping. Condenser mics will give you more clarity in the high range, though you have to use them in well prepared rooms.

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Condenser microphones are more sensitive than dynamic ones. That means unless you are planning to scream into a mic on stage, a condenser microphone is your choice. I had MXL V67GThanks to the low price and USB connectivity MXL V67G is a popular choice.

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