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Best Head Voice Strengthening Exercises

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Hi.  My head voice is very weak.  I hadn't even started to sing in it since a few months ago.  I cannot make it very loud.

please recommend me some exercises to make my head voice stronger.  Thanks

I've been doing the goo and nah noises.  

 

 

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In addition to hooting like an Owl on narrowed vowels... which I think could be helpful, provided that you engaged the adductors while you were doing it and didn't have any other constriction, embouchure, respiration, hearing pitch, problems that also needed to be resolved before Dan's suggested could help you... Which I like... I like the idea of doing glissandos (sirens) through the vocal break on narrowed vowels... that is a good idea... But with all due respect to Maestro Dan whom I respect quite a bit... if you have other problems that are standing in your way that first need to be ironed out, you won't be able to get the benefit from Maestro Dan's tip...

1). Train. Investing a program that gives you materials and content that teaches you how to train techniques that will make you stronger and more coordinated. The best way to strengthen your head voice is to work specialized onsets that build the strength of the adductors (inside muscles for belting), followed by vocal workouts. Could be sirens, could be other workouts, but the onsets are the more important thing.

2). Equally important to the onsets is your acoustics and vowels. You have to understand AND execute on the proper singing vowels to enable the physiology to do what you are training it to do. If you are training the onsets mentioned above, for example... but you fail to tune your voice to the proper singing vowels (formants), your just going to continue to choke and constrict. It is not enough to just modify to some vowels, but you HAVE to understand them. Each of them. Where they resonate and when to modify to them in both training and singing (shading...). 

3). You also have to train respiration, specifically... betting great sub-glottal respiration pressure... which produces great Bernoulli physics in the glottis. That simply means... enough air velocity through the vocal folds so that a vacuum is produced that passively closes the vocal folds, instead of squeezing the "twanger".

4). You have to calibrate these three things at the right acoustic mass, per the frequency... or what Dan calls "Intensity". 

5). Lastly, you have to apply all of that after about 30-45 minutes of technique training, to songs... half of your strength and coordination building comes from applying it to songs and working out the parts... but with, your new techniques and understanding of how the voice works. 

There is no simple... quick tip or dime store solution that is going to seriously help you to get your head voice to execute the way you want it to, consistently... unless you:

1). Understand some basics on how the singing voice works; acoustics and physiology... at least enough to understand the instructions.

2). Train with a reliable program that has content to work with. (not just reading a book... but mic in hand, and practicing).

3). Sing songs and workout the parts with your new found knowledge and coordination.

I can recommend some exercises for sure.. I recommend that you purchase my training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing" and you will have all the exercises, explanations, content, work flows, videos, audio, diagrams, pictures, you name it... that you need if you want to get serious about this. 

... and you can conclude that I'm just trying to sell you something if you like... but I'm not. I'm not just "trying to sell you my product"... I am trying to help you and I am telling you what the bottom-line is..., no BS reality & truth of what you need to do to really get progress and sing better. Don't shop for "Quick Easy Tips" on this forum and YouTube... It isn't going to do the work for you... The choice is up to you what you do with it.

Tough Love Coach

:loud:

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Hi.  My head voice is very weak.  I hadn't even started to sing in it since a few months ago.  I cannot make it very loud.

please recommend me some exercises to make my head voice stronger.  Thanks

I've been doing the goo and nah noises.  

 

 

     Have you been able to figure out what the Goo and Nah noises are for? or Why sirens with a hollow Woo or We would help? They are good exercises and they will help but you get the most out of them when you know why. The learning why and how to do them properly is best when learned from a coach or program.

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Agreed.  I can tell you for myself... just doing a vocal technique idea, but not really understanding it, doesn't have lasting results... but as soon as I really understand why and what it is doing for me... then my body takes ownership of the idea and I get great results... 

You have to understand why, not just "what to do"... if you take a little extra effort to do that... your efforts on vocal training will really accelerate. 

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Additionally, when I'm doing exercises that force closure, like "nay nay nay", I can get more volume and clarity than when I'm actually singing in head voice

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OK... but you can do a "nay, nay, nay"... which is basically a Track & Release Onset in my system, put into a vocalize... this is designed to create vocal compression... a light compression, not belt compression... are you training with SS/MM or some SLS type program? They are big on this workout...

Anyways... your statement is confused... you can get volume and clarity on a "nay, nay, nay" in your head voice as well.. in fact, you should be able to and if you can't get the 'nay, nay, nay" to have volume, clarity and "fullness" to it in the head voice... then that is precisely the reason why certain approaches to training students are too weak... 

"nay, nay, nay" is a good thing... nice for some light compression. Nice to get some resonance going... probably a good idea for warming up... but you will really struggle... or in my opinion, NEVER train your voice to belt and pull chest on a "nay, nay, nay"... it is an onset that just isn't designed to do that.

But again, back to your post... you should be able to... and should be training to... get closure, volume and clarity in your head voice... but "nay, nay, nays" are by far not the best choice to achieve that goal. They are just too light and fluffy... 

Im presuming you want to make your head voice sound full and big... like everyone does... right?

To do that, you have to change what your doing... 

Hope this helps. 

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NEVER train your voice to belt and pull chest on a "nay, nay, nay"... it is an onset that just isn't designed to do that.

 

Rob, can you explain your reasons on this one.  Thanks.  Bob

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@Bob... & Members:

Like I said Bob... "nay, nay, nay" is what it is. It is bound by its constituent, you can't make it or will it to be or do something it simply is not able to do.  

For you more experienced members.... The primary thing to look at and understand is the consonant. If you understand the significance of the consonants on any onset, you will be able to "read" or "decrypt" if you will... insight as to what training and singing benefit it will serve. Just like understanding vowels, some resonant forward, some resonant backward and how to use them, ... consonants ALSO open doors of insight to a smart student and singer. 

For example:

- Plosives consonants tend to be very helpful in anchoring the larynx (dampening) and they also engage the adductors for belting.

/b/, /d/, /t/, /p/, /g/, /k/, etc...

- Aspirate consonants are superb for opening up the head voice and reducing constriction.

/h/, /s/

- Voiced Glides are fantastic for engaging a VERY strong (quack mode) compression, or vocal fold closure.

/r/, /y/, /q/

- And our good friends, the Nasal consonants are great for a Light (twang mode), compression or vocal fold closure.. AND, they balance sub-glottal respiration pressure. (this is why nasals are used in warm ups).

/m/, /n/, /ng/

Now then... following the general rules above... we see that the consonant /n/, which is a nasal consonant is ... really nice for a light compression of the vocal folds. It is great for helping students to twang. This is why it is very helpful... HOWEVER, the level of musculature engagement on a light nasal consonant is not going to engage the adductors enough to really do much with the head voice. It will give exactly what you should expect it to give you... a light and polite twangy compression in the head voice...

BUT...

If you want to build belt strength in the head voice. If you want to pull more M1 and sound more Modal in the head voice... you have to do more resistance training. You have to contract, pull and stretch and some times attack the onset. To make the head voice sound full and "boomy" you have to do bench press and squats... metaphorically, you can't do light workouts stretching a big rubber band in the gym.

Cutting to the chase Bob, nasal consonants just don't move enough mass. They don't provide any resistance training for the adductors that are going to lead to big, full, beefy belting.  If this is what you want to do... you have to train workouts with plosive consonants, glottal attacks and train and sing a lot with narrowed vowels.

This is one of the main reasons why SS/MM and SLS are often times, too light in the head voice for students that are ready to get onto belting... It is true that there is also the "guh, guh, guh" workout that has potential to "belt" more, but the way it is taught is just... pussed out and too light. Even a plosive won't work for you, if you don't put it to work.

All this light pussy foot'n around and teaching fear of feeling anything in the larynx has consequences... namely, weak head voices that can't belt and students that are frustrated because they can't get their head voice to beef up.

The onsets in "The Four Pillars of Singing" are specifically grouped into two groups:

1. Coordination & Tuning Onsets

&

2. Resistance Training Onsets

... and the above lesson gives you insights as to why... one of the reasons why the study of onsets is so effective and helpful, is partly because they are somewhat oriented toward the unique attributes and benefits of the consonants.

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I wanted to ask JW how he figures he is not in head voice when doing nay exercises. Head voice is not a part of the range, though it is often more prevalent in the upper range.

One of those times where a teacher might clear it up quick, providing the student, like all those asian wisdom scenes in movies, is prepared to empty his cup of preconceptions before receiving a new truth.

"You have done well, Grasshopper. You may now leave the temple."

"Yes, Master Pho."

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@Bob... & Members:

Like I said Bob... "nay, nay, nay" is what it is. It is bound by its constituent, you can't make it or will it to be or do something it simply is not able to do.  

For you more experienced members.... The primary thing to look at and understand is the consonant. If you understand the significance of the consonants on any onset, you will be able to "read" or "decrypt" if you will... insight as to what training and singing benefit it will serve. Just like understanding vowels, some resonant forward, some resonant backward and how to use them, ... consonants ALSO open doors of insight to a smart student and singer. 

For example:

- Plosives consonants tend to be very helpful in anchoring the larynx (dampening) and they also engage the adductors for belting.

/b/, /d/, /t/, /p/, /g/, /k/, etc...

- Aspirate consonants are superb for opening up the head voice and reducing constriction.

/h/, /s/

- Voiced Glides are fantastic for engaging a VERY strong (quack mode) compression, or vocal fold closure.

/r/, /y/, /q/

- And our good friends, the Nasal consonants are great for a Light (twang mode), compression or vocal fold closure.. AND, they balance sub-glottal respiration pressure. (this is why nasals are used in warm ups).

/m/, /n/, /ng/

Now then... following the general rules above... we see that the consonant /n/, which is a nasal consonant is ... really nice for a light compression of the vocal folds. It is great for helping students to twang. This is why it is very helpful... HOWEVER, the level of musculature engagement on a light nasal consonant is not going to engage the adductors enough to really do much with the head voice. It will give exactly what you should expect it to give you... a light and polite twangy compression in the head voice...

BUT...

If you want to build belt strength in the head voice. If you want to pull more M1 and sound more Modal in the head voice... you have to do more resistance training. You have to contract, pull and stretch and some times attack the onset. To make the head voice sound full and "boomy" you have to do bench press and squats... metaphorically, you can't do light workouts stretching a big rubber band in the gym.

Cutting to the chase Bob, nasal consonants just don't move enough mass. They don't provide any resistance training for the adductors that are going to lead to big, full, beefy belting.  If this is what you want to do... you have to train workouts with plosive consonants, glottal attacks and train and sing a lot with narrowed vowels.

This is one of the main reasons why SS/MM and SLS are often times, too light in the head voice for students that are ready to get onto belting... It is true that there is also the "guh, guh, guh" workout that has potential to "belt" more, but the way it is taught is just... pussed out and too light. Even a plosive won't work for you, if you don't put it to work.

All this light pussy foot'n around and teaching fear of feeling anything in the larynx has consequences... namely, weak head voices that can't belt and students that are frustrated because they can't get their head voice to beef up.

The onsets in "The Four Pillars of Singing" are specifically grouped into two groups:

1. Coordination & Tuning Onsets

&

2. Resistance Training Onsets

... and the above lesson gives you insights as to why... one of the reasons why the study of onsets is so effective and helpful, is partly because they are somewhat oriented toward the unique attributes and benefits of the consonants.

Thanks for all these tips man, really appreciate it.  I like how you broke all the consonants down to show what they are helpful for.

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@Bob... & Members:

Like I said Bob... "nay, nay, nay" is what it is. It is bound by its constituent, you can't make it or will it to be or do something it simply is not able to do.

For you more experienced members.... The primary thing to look at and understand is the consonant. If you understand the significance of the consonants on any onset, you will be able to "read" or "decrypt" if you will... insight as to what training and singing benefit it will serve. Just like understanding vowels, some resonant forward, some resonant backward and how to use them, ... consonants ALSO open doors of insight to a smart student and singer. 

For example:

- Plosives consonants tend to be very helpful in anchoring the larynx (dampening) and they also engage the adductors for belting.

/b/, /d/, /t/, /p/, /g/, /k/, etc...

- Aspirate consonants are superb for opening up the head voice and reducing constriction.

/h/, /s/

- Voiced Glides are fantastic for engaging a VERY strong (quack mode) compression, or vocal fold closure.

/r/, /y/, /q/

- And our good friends, the Nasal consonants are great for a Light (twang mode), compression or vocal fold closure.. AND, they balance sub-glottal respiration pressure. (this is why nasals are used in warm ups).

/m/, /n/, /ng/

Now then... following the general rules above... we see that the consonant /n/, which is a nasal consonant is ... really nice for a light compression of the vocal folds. It is great for helping students to twang. This is why it is very helpful... HOWEVER, the level of musculature engagement on a light nasal consonant is not going to engage the adductors enough to really do much with the head voice. It will give exactly what you should expect it to give you... a light and polite twangy compression in the head voice...

BUT...

If you want to build belt strength in the head voice. If you want to pull more M1 and sound more Modal in the head voice... you have to do more resistance training. You have to contract, pull and stretch and some times attack the onset. To make the head voice sound full and "boomy" you have to do bench press and squats... metaphorically, you can't do light workouts stretching a big rubber band in the gym.

Cutting to the chase Bob, nasal consonants just don't move enough mass. They don't provide any resistance training for the adductors that are going to lead to big, full, beefy belting.  If this is what you want to do... you have to train workouts with plosive consonants, glottal attacks and train and sing a lot with narrowed vowels.

This is one of the main reasons why SS/MM and SLS are often times, too light in the head voice for students that are ready to get onto belting... It is true that there is also the "guh, guh, guh" workout that has potential to "belt" more, but the way it is taught is just... pussed out and too light. Even a plosive won't work for you, if you don't put it to work.

All this light pussy foot'n around and teaching fear of feeling anything in the larynx has consequences... namely, weak head voices that can't belt and students that are frustrated because they can't get their head voice to beef up.

The onsets in "The Four Pillars of Singing" are specifically grouped into two groups:

1. Coordination & Tuning Onsets

&

2. Resistance Training Onsets

... and the above lesson gives you insights as to why... one of the reasons why the study of onsets is so effective and helpful, is partly because they are somewhat oriented toward the unique attributes and benefits of the consonants.

     This is the stuff you do not get in other programs.......Yes, If you are paying attention to what happens through sensations and such you May luck into doing an exercise correctly and use it for a given purpose.... Know why you are using an exercise and How to engage it properly..... Then it will give you more benefits.

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I wanted to ask JW how he figures he is not in head voice when doing nay exercises. Head voice is not a part of the range, though it is often more prevalent in the upper range.

One of those times where a teacher might clear it up quick, providing the student, like all those asian wisdom scenes in movies, is prepared to empty his cup of preconceptions before receiving a new truth.

"You have done well, Grasshopper. You may now leave the temple."

"Yes, Master Pho."

I know I am in head voice when I do the nay nay nay, But it is easier to balance and sound smooth during the exercise than it is when singing an actual song.

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Rob thank you for the very in-depth reply.  That really clarifies things for me.

And Dan, did you ever hear how Marvin Gaye Does always does big "Wooo" Slides down from head voice?

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Rob, I understand and respect your opinion.

I would just like to say I routinely do loud scales using nay and may where i begin low and run up the voice as high as possible but it's done in conjunction with a very strong diaphagmatic lock down (very physical) which takes pressure off the larynx and gives me freedom in the folds and extra room up top.

If i didn't do it with the greater degree of support, I would just build up way too much sub-glottal pressure and lock myself up. In fact, if I'm feeling a little tired, I know now from experience I'm not going to have to have the strength to lock and hold the diaphragm well enough to do it right.

I've been doing those diaphragm locking workouts I told you about trying to add seconds to keeping it way down and steady.....(advanced stuff).

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I wanted to ask JW how he figures he is not in head voice when doing nay exercises. Head voice is not a part of the range, though it is often more prevalent in the upper range.

One of those times where a teacher might clear it up quick, providing the student, like all those asian wisdom scenes in movies, is prepared to empty his cup of preconceptions before receiving a new truth.

"You have done well, Grasshopper. You may now leave the temple."

"Yes, Master Pho."

I know I am in head voice when I do the nay nay nay, But it is easier to balance and sound smooth during the exercise than it is when singing an actual song.

JW...

This experience is VERY common for everyone. The vocal workouts are stable and working, but when you transition to songs, it unravels and begins to shit out again, Why? I'll tell you why... 

- Plosive consonants in the lyrics. or... (not knowing how to use the properly).
- Narrowed Vowels.
- Diphthongs.
- Melodic patterns and respiration requirements that are awkward or not designed to be "fluid", like a workout.... and element of chaos is suddenly introduced to your voice that wasn't there before.

These are all elements that don't show up as often in training. It is like your on the 1 yard line and then when you start singing, you take a 20 yard penalty and have to start again from the 20 yard line. And that is true... because it gets more difficult. 

But here is the lesson...

The point that your nasal consonant "nay, nay, nays" don't work as smoothly for you when you transition to singing, is an important clue that is telling you that, ... in order to transition smoothly to singing and not have your voice shit out, you must be failing to do something. It tells you that what works in a vocalize, isn't always going to work in singing... so again, what is the delta?  What is the missing piece that you need to make your singing not shit out and sound full?

... and I'm NOT going to hand you the answer... 

You reply back to this and tell me the answer, because you can find the answer to this question in the lesson I provided above... 

:z-coffee:     :wallbash:

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Rob, I understand and respect your opinion.

I would just like to say I routinely do loud scales using nay and may where i begin low and run up the voice as high as possible but it's done in conjunction with a very strong diaphagmatic lock down (very physical) which takes pressure off the larynx and gives me freedom in the folds and extra room up top.

If i didn't do it with the greater degree of support, I would just build up way too much sub-glottal pressure and lock myself up. In fact, if I'm feeling a little tired, I know now from experience I'm not going to have to have the strength to lock and hold the diaphragm well enough to do it right.

I've been doing those diaphragm locking workouts I told you about trying to add seconds to keeping it way down and steady.....(advanced stuff).

Bob...

There is nothing in your response that contradicts my lesson above... 

The nuance I think you may not be totally appreciating is... you are describing a level of respiratory support and control... and sub-glottal pressure, and on top of that... adductor strength that 90% of these guys do not have yet. You are describing a vocal technique experience that only someone with vast amounts of experience training and singing and understanding can execute upon. 

Can I make a "Nay, nay, nay" belt and "pull" TA and sound chesty?  OF COURSE!  And so could you, or Daniel, or anyone that has built that strength... but the average person that is doing "nay, nay, nays"... do not have that musculature and coordination to make a nasal consonant onset "belt"... or likely, the respiration to support it. There are a list of things that are not built or coordinated yet.

My lesson above is MOSTLY beneficial to beginners... not people that already have built the strength and coordination to belt.

There is a lack of understanding around what students and the majority of the members reading and posting here, are capable of doing... This is a nuance that I see from time to time with my esteemed, experienced colleagues on here sometimes... remember a long time ago Bob, when you couldn't do shit in the head voice and it would just shit out and go windy and you didn't understand why... and you would listen to other great singers and ask, "... how does he do that?"... Remember when that was you Bob? ... those are the people that are reading this forum... and as a voice coach I'll tell you, a lot of them, have a hard time just singing an onset on pitch... 

I share this comment in defense of the beginners on this forum... to those of you... lol... just keep training and learning... it will come... we have a LOT of seriously talented people on here with years of experience... I think they forget sometimes what its like to choke in an E4 or have your voice shit out to Falsetto all the time... we have all been there... just don't give up.

:unsure:

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So Nasal Consonants are too weak alone to train the voice.


Seems I need to be focusing on plosives and Glides then to really improve the strength of my head voice as fast as possible? 
 

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Very few things are "absolute" in singing or singing technique JW... The only thing that is absolute, or a "constant" and never changes is frequency... just making the point that these are suggestions based on extensive experience and know how, which is probably all you need, but nothing on this forum are the "10 commandments of singing'.

Anyways... to answer you question... Nasal consonants in their basic nature, ESPECIALLY when trained in this popular "nay, nay, nay..." workout that comes from the "sing like you speak" camps... is not going to build your belts. Of course, to be more certain, we would need to hear HOW you are doing the "nay, nay, nay"... as I pointed out to Bob, some people can engage the belt musculature on a nasal consonant and they, you, me ... we all should be able to... but, for a beginner that has not developed this strength and coordination yet... AND... is doing the "nay, nay, nay..." in this light, "don't feel anything in your larynx"... approach that it is usually taught as... NO. The odds are very much against you... you need onsets and other techniques we haven't even touched upon to build great belt strength.

But, if what you are extracting from my lesson above is that Plosives would be more helpful, or at least point you in a better direction for building belt musculature, then the answer is yes... plosives have more to offer and have a higher degree of success for building belt musculature then nasals. Glides are not any more useful in this regard then nasals. So, no glides are not the best consonants to put on an onset, if you want to build your belt strength.

... but I need to make something VERY CLEAR! I am not saying, stop training nasals, glides, aspirate, etc... all the other onsets that have these consonants. They all train important coordinations for singing. Don't suddenly become "the plosives guy"... that would missing the bigger picture. In fact, it could be argued that the most beneficial consonants ARE nasals. They do the most for you!!!... but they are just not the first choice for belting and musculature work on the adductors.

... but I'm struck by another, unrelated question here however... 

I don't understand the whole, "... as fast as possible" thing? That is really confusing... Why does your training and results need to be "... as fast as possible"? Are you thinking that at some point you will have the belt strength you need and want and at that point, you'll be done? Is that the way you perceive singing and voice training, that when or if you finally get there and can do the thing you want to do... that you will be done and won't have to continue to work it, maintain it, train it, sing with it, etc... 

Why does developing physical strength and coordination have to be such a rush?

My training system, The Four Pillars of Singing has the most detailed and extensive explanation of onsets in the industry. We are big on Onsets at TVS... fyi.  And you can purchase at my store here... or on the new TMV World Vocal Workout Downloads... there will be some other coaches adding offerings in here soon as well... I invited about 8 coaches last night to participate if the wanted to.

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  After reading Roberts post what struck me was the "As Fast As Possible" thing.    To get the proper coordination as fast as possible.....Buy Roberts Programs, Learn the onsets.... and Train......Why?

    There is a whole lot of different aspects that have to come together....Maybe not a whole lot, but a few... but there is a whole bunch of crap that gets in the way.....

Roberts Program not only points out the different aspects but provides Quick access to the CORRECT means to train and cuts out the crap....Big gains in the proper direction Quick.......Not finished great sounding head voice Quick.....That takes the training...Quick access to the PROPER TRAINING.......

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  After reading Roberts post what struck me was the "As Fast As Possible" thing.    To get the proper coordination as fast as possible.....Buy Roberts Programs, Learn the onsets.... and Train......Why?

    There is a whole lot of different aspects that have to come together....Maybe not a whole lot, but a few... but there is a whole bunch of crap that gets in the way.....

Roberts Program not only points out the different aspects but provides Quick access to the CORRECT means to train and cuts out the crap....Big gains in the proper direction Quick.......Not finished great sounding head voice Quick.....That takes the training...Quick access to the PROPER TRAINING.......

MDEW, thank you for pointing this out. It is true... I guess since I live with my program every day, I may take certain things for granted. But it is honestly true... if you train the work flows and routines in "The Four Pillars of Singing", you will likely experience the fastest track from confusion, to understanding what the hell you have to do, PRECISELY, faster then in any other training program. 

About three years ago I developed training work flows, which basically just mean, "... step 1, step 2, step 3, etc...". And what I have done with "The Four Pillars of Singing" is broken down a lot of the training techniques into training work flows for the purpose of being efficient and very clear. You will not find a lot of "sing purple", anecdotal stuff in my program... it explains, it then provides a method and techniques (such as the training work flows), it demonstrates and then it gives you a routine to follow... and the rest is up to you. It is a NO BULLSHIT program and if you are prepared to get to work and train it... you will get quick results. Several of the onsets have training work flows, the vocal effects do... especially the vocal distortion techniques, belting techniques, and bridging the vocal break.

While my program may honestly be the fastest and most clear way to go from point A to point B in your vocal training, we have to remind you that there is no "quick easy tip" that is going to make you sing amazing overnight. YOU HAVE TO TRAIN THE MUSCULATURE. It takes time... just like building your biceps when start working out at the gym... it is similar to that... but ONLY ... if you have the right techniques and training. If you are, for example... only doing light mass "nay, nay, nays"... or God knows what else some "teachers" have their students wasting time with... it can take a lifetime, frankly, it will never happen. You really do have to have the right content to train. There are a handful of programs and products that do, mine is one of them

I apologize I didn't give you a better answer before and thank MDEW for calling me out to do it.  Read The Table of Contents and Reviews in my signature... Also, I just created an offering for the program at the new TMV World Teacher Workout download store... check it out, its pretty cool!!

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On 8 de julio de 2015 at 2:10 AM, Robert Lunte said:

 

All this light pussy foot'n around and teaching fear of feeling anything in the larynx has consequences... namely, weak head voices that can't belt and students that are frustrated because they can't get their head voice to beef up.

 

 

This thread is very good. I was also thinking the Nay doesn't work for me, because I was expecting to open my Head voice...now I see there are better things for Opening it. In the end when I get my best head voice is just by singing songs, and usually while going for a walk... :D Then I feel a bit guilty that I am pushing too much singing higher notes (I don't know which are, but am sure they are much higher than the ones I have as solid now) haha so I like your paragraph there.

 

I don't even feel anything in my throat when I am singing those notes, but just was not sure if suddenly singing higher notes when very warmed up could be bad.

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1 hour ago, Rosa said:

 

This thread is very good. I was also thinking the Nay doesn't work for me, because I was expecting to open my Head voice...now I see there are better things for Opening it. In the end when I get my best head voice is just by singing songs, and usually while going for a walk... :D Then I feel a bit guilty that I am pushing too much singing higher notes (I don't know which are, but am sure they are much higher than the ones I have as solid now) haha so I like your paragraph there.

 

I don't even feel anything in my throat when I am singing those notes, but just was not sure if suddenly singing higher notes when very warmed up could be bad.

    The Nay"s and Naa's are about placement and cord closure NOT about strengthening. Opening up the vowel and adding volume from there without loosing placement and cord closure is what will strengthen things.

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