Sign in to follow this  
averagesinger

edge excercises before nay nays

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

i am a complete beginner who started using  singing for stars program by seth riggs

what i  did was that i did edge excercises before nays nays and mum mum

so does that mean that edge excercises would be of no benefit to me

i would like to know about how to nay nay nay properly 

should i do it everyday and how often

how should i feel or what sensations should i have while doing nay nay nay

how should a perfect nay nay be  and should it stop doing after doing it perfectly and move on to mum mum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You won't get much tips for SLS here. Also you should've got Brett Manning's Singing Success 360 if you're aiming for SLS. Singing for the stars is old and has very little explanations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ronws we always have Daniel formica who has both trained with seth Dave stroud ron Anderson and many more :) add in the fact he's one of the best singers ive ever heard i think he can answer the questions 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You won't get much tips for SLS here. Also you should've got Brett Manning's Singing Success 360 if you're aiming for SLS. Singing for the stars is old and has very little explanations.

   Thanks Rockstar.....Nice info here.

   I stumbled onto Carl's videos a while back and have been trying to find them again......Lots of good information and he has good way of explaining things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean by "Edging"? If you are referring to TVS edging... I don't think Daniel has enough experience on TVS Edging vowels to speak to what they are or what the significance is in relation to "nay, nay, nay"s.  

In any regard, why is this complicated? 

TVS edging are forward, hard palette resonating vowels.  Nay, nay, nay.. is a vocalize that was popularized by SLS and then everyone else and their 2nd cousin now teaches it. It is designed to create light, pharyngeal twang compression. Thats it... 

Since edging vowels are more aggressive, I would probably warm up with "nay, nay, nays" , then do vowel modification formulas with edging vowels after that. 

Hope that answers your question. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, regardless if by "Edge" you mean CVT or TVS Edge (which is very similar anyways), nay nay nay will not get you that. Those Nays are more of an excercise for addings the necessary twang to a neutral coordination and getting into a light head voice. Edge on the other hand requires way more twang compression than that and for training it I would recommend training quack mode for a while to get that really heavy twang going.

As opposed to many other things in singing which are more of a coordination thing, the twanger actually needs to be strengthened to keep Edge mode active in the high area of the voice. And you strengthen it best by using it heavily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean by "Edging"? If you are referring to TVS edging... I don't think Daniel has enough experience on TVS Edging vowels to speak to what they are or what the significance is in relation to "nay, nay, nay"s.  

In any regard, why is this complicated? 

TVS edging are forward, hard palette resonating vowels.  Nay, nay, nay.. is a vocalize that was popularized by SLS and then everyone else and their 2nd cousin now teaches it. It is designed to create light, pharyngeal twang compression. Thats it... 

Since edging vowels are more aggressive, I would probably warm up with "nay, nay, nays" , then do vowel modification formulas with edging vowels after that. 

Hope that answers your question. 

    I was just thinking that with regards to SLS exercises.....they are more of a warm up to get you an initial connection/coordination.......edging in SLS is teaching to use just the edges of the folds to lighten the mass, Not an acoustic mode for singing like CVT and TVS.

    TVS and The Four Pillars are more like the real workout.....the thing that will get you the strength and duration for real world singing.

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Edge on the other hand requires way more twang compression than that and for training it I would recommend training quack mode for a while to get that really heavy twang going.

  the twanger actually needs to be strengthened to keep Edge mode active in the high area of the voice. And you strengthen it best by using it heavily.

.... and one of the best things you can do to strengthen the twanger is train edging vowels...

As usual, Benny nails it...  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

    I was just thinking that with regards to SLS exercises.....they are more of a warm up to get you an initial connection/coordination.......edging in SLS is teaching to use just the edges of the folds to lighten the mass, Not an acoustic mode for singing like CVT and TVS.

    TVS and The Four Pillars are more like the real workout.....the thing that will get you the strength and duration for real world singing.

  

Yes. When you are done with "free secret tips" on YouTube and this forum... and done reading books and done doing super light head voice nay, nay, nays and goo, goo, ga, gas... when your ready to train like Rocky... "4Pillars" will be there for you... just saying... its kind of true... 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean by "Edging"? If you are referring to TVS edging... I don't think Daniel has enough experience on TVS Edging vowels to speak to what they are or what the significance is in relation to "nay, nay, nay"s.  

In any regard, why is this complicated? 

TVS edging are forward, hard palette resonating vowels.  Nay, nay, nay.. is a vocalize that was popularized by SLS and then everyone else and their 2nd cousin now teaches it. It is designed to create light, pharyngeal twang compression. Thats it... 

Since edging vowels are more aggressive, I would probably warm up with "nay, nay, nays" , then do vowel modification formulas with edging vowels after that. 

Hope that answers your question. 

on the contrary I think I do :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, "nay" itself is not a diphthong but it has a diphthong in it if you speak it, as if you were saying "nay sayer"... but if you vocal train it or sing it, it doesn't... or shouldn't.

Similar, if you speak "eh", it has a diphthong, if you train or sing it, it shouldn't.

The IPA and English equivalent for the sound color in "cat" is, ae/a, not :a/ah. Both of those open vowels to not have diphthongs if you speak them and of course should not if you train or sing them. 

ɛ/eh and ae/a are TVS edging vowels, but :a/ah is a TVS neutral vowel, which is trained the same as Ken's "pingy"/gaggy "Ah"...

So, I hope that helps clarify a bit about TVS edging vowels and which ones have diphthongs or not.

Regarding the issue of TVS edging vowels vs the speech level "nay, nay, nays", that is as stated above... TVS edging vowels are forward, hard palette resonant vowels, "nay, nay, nay" is a popular vocalize that some teachers use to get a light compression in the head voice, but unfortunately, does not work the belt musculature that students need if they want to sing full in the head voice. Thus, in my opinion, "nay, nay, nay" is good for a warm up, but not really a serious workout.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nay like May is a dipthong.. I'm not rewriting anything here. Eh is not, its eh as in eh.one singular vowel.  Ah as in cat or ah as in hot is singular as well. Like" no" the dipthong is important for the exercise bring up the connection then a little release to a headier feeling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok! LOL... Maestro Dan and I just had an offline huddle council... Ok, so if the classic "nay , nay , nay" vocalize is suppose to have the i/ee diphthong in it, then I stand corrected. I didn't think it was. I assumed that "nay nay nay" was the same as "neh neh neh" and thus, you would not bother bugging up your work out by trying to chock around the i/ee diphthong in a vocalize. But, I can see how that might have some benefits as well.

:woohoo:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this