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volume confusion

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MB20
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I know that to create a a louder volume, you don't need to use more air but I don't know exactly how it is achieved correctly. I have heard it's about thickening the chords however, if this were the case, how would this apply to a high pitched note in head voice where the chords need to be thin. It seems counter intuitive. Needless to say, I'm a little confused; so if anybody could shed any light on this for me it would be much appreciated.

:D

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I know that to create a a louder volume, you don't need to use more air but I don't know exactly how it is achieved correctly. I have heard it's about thickening the chords however, if this were the case, how would this apply to a high pitched note in head voice where the chords need to be thin. It seems counter intuitive. Needless to say, I'm a little confused; so if anybody could shed any light on this for me it would be much appreciated.

:D

one of the ways to acheive volume in the upper range is with an increase in breath support. with full-voice high notes you're metering pressurized air through a smaller opening through thinned out vocal folds. it won't take more air to make them vibrate at the higher pitches, but it will require more "controlled" air pressure.

optimizing resonance is another.

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I know that to create a a louder volume, you don't need to use more air but I don't know exactly how it is achieved correctly. I have heard it's about thickening the chords however, if this were the case, how would this apply to a high pitched note in head voice where the chords need to be thin. It seems counter intuitive. Needless to say, I'm a little confused; so if anybody could shed any light on this for me it would be much appreciated.

MB20: To make a given note 'louder' correctly, one must first have a correct basic technique for that note. If the basic technique is in-place, then simply 'wanting' it to be louder while maintaining technique will make it louder. IMO, the very best exercise for developing this kind of dynamic control is the messa di voce, as described at:

http://www.themodernvocalist.com/profiles/blogs/vocal-terminology-messa-di

I think another useful thing to say at this point is that the thinness of the vocal bands should not be confused with their top-to-bottom depth. Yes, for higher notes they are stretched, but when the muscles 'inside' the vocal bands are actively involved to the right amount, the tone produced is a 'full voice' one because the vertical dimension of the glottis is still substantial.

A fair amount of other discussion on this topic can be found in the articles about maneuvering through the passaggio and the use of twang.

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VIDEOHERE: thanks, these are definitely areas that I will look into.

Steven Fraser: That article was an interesting read and something i will try out in my practice routine so thank you! the notion of the "depth" of the chords never occurred to me, so I think that has cleared up my confusion as well.

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