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Berabouman

Complete Beginner to Home Recording

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Hi all! I was thinking of doing some recordings to put on Youtube, but I am a complete novice to recording - all I have is a 10 dollar mic I picked up at my local hardware shop. Needless to say it doesn't exactly record very well.

What would I need to make a decent/semi-decent recording? I'm just doing this as a hobbyist so my budget is not much, perhaps in the 100-200 dollar range. A problem that I encounter with just using a mic is making sure I can record both the sound coming from my speakers and my voice as well.

Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks in advance!

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If you are using a computer, here is what you do on such a limited budget. You will need something better than the 10 dollar mic. Trust me, been there, done that. 

(prices USD)

Best Buy; m-audio m-track 99 dollars + tax

They might even have an m-audio mic. You want the large diaphragm condenser. Spend another 15 dollars for xlr to xlr cable.

Software. Audacity is free. But you cannot mix effects levels in real time.

So, try Reaper. There is a free trial download. Or pay for the small use license of 60 dollars and you get updates every so often. It does everything all the other professional recording suites do. In fact, I have an old thread on Audacity and a newer thread on Reaper.

Follow Robert Lunte's link to get karaoke tracks for just about every song you can think of and you can customize the down load, for about 1 or 2 dollars. With or without background vocals, for instance.

Basically, you can get going for 200 dollars or less. But definitely step away from the 10 dollar mic.

To get Reaper, go to www.cockos.com.

And the newest version of Reaper, 5.0 and 5.2 now includes video synchro.

 

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Thanks for your reply! A few questions though :

m-audio m-track - What exactly is this? I Googled it and I get that it's a device of some sort...is it like a super good mic? Or something that makes your mic better?

But you cannot mix effects levels in real time. - What are effect levels?

 

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Welcome to the TMV World Forum.

Here's an overview of the "m-audio m-track"  >> http://www.m-audio.com/products/view/m-track#.VgV83n3-Ws8

Click on the "Features", "Specifications", and "Requirements" tabs as well....

No, it is NOT a mic, nor does it include one !

Regards,

Adolph

 

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Thanks for chiming in, Chief.

The m-audio m-track is a 2-channel USB based interface. It has jacks on it for xlr cable and for standard phono. And MIDI in and out, too. And also left and right channel line out that you would either cable to an amp and monitor (speakers) or line out to active monitors (speakers with their own built-in amplifiers, often the preferred method for monitors.)

For now, I would not worry about the monitors. Get some decent headphones and use those. 

It has a zero latency live monitor which means that while you are recording against a playback, there is no delay for your vocals, like there would be if you were monitoring through software, In fact, if you use the m-track or others, like the Scarlett 2in2, which is also popular, don't even bother with monitoring through software.

This interface can take a mic, a line in from a guitar amp or effects module, or direct inject your guitar or bass guitar. It also has an insert jack in case you like to use outboard effects units when mixing the tracks in something like Reaper or Protools. I have had good luck with the included effects in Reaper, so I have not bothered with inserted effects boxes. And really, I don't have effects boxes. What I most often do is jack my Flying V guitar into my Roland GS-6 (professional) digital rack unit. Then that jacks into the m-audio that I have.

If you can help it, get two mics. A large diaphragm condenser for vocals and softer instruments. And a dynamic. The cheapest is the shure sm57. Find them on ebay. Average about 50 dollars. My dynamic is a Sennheiser e835 that cost me 75 dolllars total on ebay, new. I have two condenser mics. Fame CM-1, which gives kind of a bright sound. And the MXL V67G, which gives a slightly "darker" sound, which rounds out the edges of my high and bright voice. And for good reason, it was designed to sound the like old tube-powered mics.

The dynamic has a less accurate response but it is good for loud sounds, like a loud singer, guitar amp, some parts of a drum kit. Generally, just place the mic close to the amp and twiddle dials until what you hear in your headphones is what you want. Don't just listen to the amp in the room. This because mics pick up everything, whereas your hearing is filtered through your ears and your psychological proclivities. 

Every pro studio has a handful of the sm-57s and they use them for everything. And a singer such as Bruce Dickinson has literally made a career lasting for decades, as in about 40+ years, with the Shure sm57 and 58.

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effects levels. Amount of reverb, amount of chorus, delay, eq adjustments.

In Audacity, the only thing you can adjust in playback is track volume and pan position. The other effects, you select values ahead of time and cannot adjust in playback.

Reaper, you can adjust all of it in playback. With Reaper, you can even move section of vocals, called an item, during playback, though I would not advise doing that because you are asking the computer to play data at two places in time at once and it causes skips and cracks. How do I know that? Because I have done it.

Blame it on Einstein. But everything else, effects levels and settings, can be adjusted during playback to suit your needs.

 

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Of the DAWs (digital audio workstation) out there, Protools has been use quite often by professional studios. It also comes with a professional studio price. And the earlier versions only worked with the interface and other hardware you bought to go with it and it could be a couple of thousand dollars. 

Other software suites like Cubase and Cakewalk by Sonar also have a signficant price tag. But I have become a fanboy of Reaper. Fellow members Felipe Carvahlo and David Lyon have done really good things with it. Reaper is really good if you have a pc, though you can get the OS download for Mac, if that what you are using. Our forum owner and benefactor, Robert Lunte is using a Mac and LogicPro. He has also has a friend with a studio who will mix his full scale productions. But he has been supportive of me having the Reaper thread and talking about that.

Reaper has two license prices. For the home hobbyist and people who make sales up to $20k a year, the license is 60 dollars and will get you through 2 full versions. If you start at version 5.2 it will get your through 7.2. You don't have to accept upgrades and you can stay at whatever version you like. And there are a number of people that took the free download and just endure the pop-ups reminding you to register. It's the honor system.

The commercial license for sales over $20k per year is 225 dollars.

Justin Frankel, the guy that developed it is not trying to make a Reaper a big business. He just wanted to make recording music easier and he has a genius-level gift for computer coding. Paying the license pays for the hours and materials to improve the software. He is happy when someone comes up with an idea because that gives him an excuse to mess with the code some more and issue a new update.

If you don't have a lot of money and you want a DAW that makes you awesome at home recordings and still able to branch out to bigger things later,  I would recommend Reaper.

And no, I get no consideration or freebies from them. As far as I know, the guys that work on it don't know who I am  and I don't post a lot in the Reaper forum, I just learn stuff there and am a fly on the wall.

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Thanks for being so patient with me. So the M-track is basically something that allows you to plug multiple instruments and devices into? But if I am only recording vocals, what's the difference between using that and a really good microphone?

So after I record something, I then go and twiddle with Reaper/Audacity to get it to sound like how I want?

 

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Thanks for chiming in, Chief.

The m-audio m-track is a 2-channel USB based interface. It has jacks on it for xlr cable and for standard phono. And MIDI in and out, too. And also left and right channel line out that you would either cable to an amp and monitor (speakers) or line out to active monitors (speakers with their own built-in amplifiers, often the preferred method for monitors.)

For now, I would not worry about the monitors. Get some decent headphones and use those. 

It has a zero latency live monitor which means that while you are recording against a playback, there is no delay for your vocals, like there would be if you were monitoring through software, In fact, if you use the m-track or others, like the Scarlett 2in2, which is also popular, don't even bother with monitoring through software.

This interface can take a mic, a line in from a guitar amp or effects module, or direct inject your guitar or bass guitar. It also has an insert jack in case you like to use outboard effects units when mixing the tracks in something like Reaper or Protools. I have had good luck with the included effects in Reaper, so I have not bothered with inserted effects boxes. And really, I don't have effects boxes. What I most often do is jack my Flying V guitar into my Roland GS-6 (professional) digital rack unit. Then that jacks into the m-audio that I have.

If you can help it, get two mics. A large diaphragm condenser for vocals and softer instruments. And a dynamic. The cheapest is the shure sm57. Find them on ebay. Average about 50 dollars. My dynamic is a Sennheiser e835 that cost me 75 dolllars total on ebay, new. I have two condenser mics. Fame CM-1, which gives kind of a bright sound. And the MXL V67G, which gives a slightly "darker" sound, which rounds out the edges of my high and bright voice. And for good reason, it was designed to sound the like old tube-powered mics.

The dynamic has a less accurate response but it is good for loud sounds, like a loud singer, guitar amp, some parts of a drum kit. Generally, just place the mic close to the amp and twiddle dials until what you hear in your headphones is what you want. Don't just listen to the amp in the room. This because mics pick up everything, whereas your hearing is filtered through your ears and your psychological proclivities. 

Every pro studio has a handful of the sm-57s and they use them for everything. And a singer such as Bruce Dickinson has literally made a career lasting for decades, as in about 40+ years, with the Shure sm57 and 58.

My pleasure, Ron. I just wanted to chime in and help Berabouman....

Honestly, you and Robert know a lot more about these home recording products/software than I do. Several years ago, a friend of mine was kind enough to give me Cubase, Cakewalk Pro Audio 9, and several other of these products. I put together ONE SONG and it took me HOURS ! I said to myself : "No more. It's much easier to go to the studio !" :) I suppose at my age I no longer have the patience.... (?)

But getting back to YOUR posts, I think it's GREAT that you are taking the time to assist our members !!! Even though I don't use these "products", I always enjoy reading your posts as well. ergo : Reaper

You mentioned the Shure 57.... I nearly purchased one a couple of years ago, but then a friend who works at my local Guitar Center suggested the Shure 57 Beta. I like it much more than the "straight" 57. But as we all know, a mic that suits one's voice may not suit another's..... Over the years, I've been helping some local vocalists, and have let them try out my various mics. So after some "trials", I would get comments to the effect : "Wow ! That sounds so much better." or "What a difference.". (etc., etc.).

Of course, I've made my suggestions in the forum as have many others over the years, BUT, if it's possible, I would suggest trying various mics BEFORE purchasing ! Of course, the key words are "if it's possible". In some states (like N.Y. for instance), it's not permitted due to health reasons. I get the reasoning, BUT, haven't the lawmakers ever heard of DISINFECTANT WIPES ? That's precisely what we do at the Guitar Center BEFORE I purchase a mic. I'm not about to buy one before trying it !!!

I know I've posted this in the past, but here's my "collection" :

 

    Rode M-1 Mic

    E-V 767a mic

    Shure SM58 mic

    Shure Beta 58 A

    Shure Beta 57 A

    Sennheiser e945

    MXL 9090 Dual capsule cardioid condenser mic

    Audio Technica mic

    Shure Unidyne IV (Robert Plant Commemorative – 1973)

    (Others – too numerous to note)

   

    T C Helicon Create

    Antares AVP Vocal Producer (Now a joint venture by Antares and Tasco)

    BBE 882i Sonic Maximizer

    Radial Hot Shot ABi Mic Switch

    M-Audio Micro-track Recorder

    Kustom Profile II PA System (Smaller venues)

    Ultratone 1800FX PA/Amp

    Alto 800W Powered Speaker/Vocal Monitors (x5)

    Samson (CR77) Wireless Converter for Dynamic mics

    Furhman Power Conditioner

    Mackie 1402 VLZ Pro 14 Channel Mixer w/mic preamps

   

    Yamaha Keyboards

    Behringer 1800W amps for keyboards

 

    Fender Strat

    Audio Technica Wireless system (for guitars)

 

   M-Audio Microtrack II Recorder

   EX 29 Extreme Isolation Headphones

   Klipsch Monitors

   Recording and Editing Software - Too numerous to mention

   

   Percussion:

   Ludwig & Rhythm Band Maracas

   Rhythm Tech Tambourine

   Professional Seed Rattles

   Wind Chimes

   Homemade Bells

 

   Cables, Stands, etc. – Too numerous to note

Don't you just love how I spend others' $$$ :) (Just trying to be humorous....)

Apologies for going "off topic" !

 

 

 

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Thanks, Adolph.

Something else I forgot to mention about the m-audio, it has +48 volt switch on channel one. This is for large diaphragm condenser mics. 

Here is why, as I will explain the difference in mics, as well as why it is called a condenser mic.

A dynamic mic is a small diaphragm attached to a small coil. This diaphragm is susceptible, some what, to the pressure of compression waves from sound. However, it is a small diaphragm, to be more responsive to loud sounds. You could theoretically sing into a speaker and do the same thing but it would take so much more sound pressure level to create the transverse waves that we do not use speakers as microphones. But dynamic mics operate on the same principle as speakers, but in opposite directions, so to speak. This coil attached to the diaphragm is moving inside a magnet, which is wire of several wrapped windings. This has an effect do the skin effect of electron flow in a conductor. This skin effect produces a field of electron activity. Wires in close proximity, such windings in the "voice coil" create a field that is changing the field on the magnet.

But, because the diaphragm is small, loud sounds producing stronger compression waves in the air stand a better chance of moving the magnet that softer noises.

A condenser mic is basically a capacitor and the old term for capacitor was condenser.

In a condenser mic, in this case, 48 volts is applied across it. Usually, a capacitor or condenser is a two fix plates with either air, or a compound, referred to as a diaelectric, between them. When current is applied to the circuit, it cannot jump across the gap. So, charges are built up on side, creating a difference in current flow potential, also known as voltage. In a condenser mic, the back plate is rigid and unmoving. On the "front side" of the mic is the other plate, made of a very flexible metal that responds to slight changes in air compression or sound. This changes the voltage potential across the two plates. And because that flexible metal plate has a larger and more flexible surface area, not as much pressure is needed to make it fluctuate. Hence, quieter sounds are more easily picked up by a condenser. Well, to use this condenser mic, you need the + 48 volts somewhere. Either in a power supply for the mic  before it goes to input or, in the case of what I am talking about, the usb interface.

And that is the shortened and condensed explanation. To go more in depth is not necessary to achieve what we want here.

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I would also like to mention, that if you can afford it, for a few hundred dollars, there are complete kits you can through this forum. Robert has a page that offers bundles. It includes, mic, stand, usb interface, and recording software. Let me find that and link it to here.

Edited to add, even easier than I thought. Just scroll all the way to the bottom of the page and click on the "vocal gear store" link. There is no possible way to make it easier than that.

http://astore.amazon.com/thevocastudin-20

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Awesome posts ronws and Adolph! Adolph BTW, what a great collection of mics! Congrats! I was wandering how do you like the e945 (Sennheiser). I got the e835 like Ronws did and I love it! I take it to all my band practices. 

I would just like to add to Ronws last post about the bundles, that there are "studio start-up" bundles from several brands such as Focusrite with headphones, audio interface (scarlet), mic cable, and a condenser mic (all focusrite brand) at relatively affordable prices.

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Awesome posts ronws and Adolph! Adolph BTW, what a great collection of mics! Congrats! I was wondering how do you like the e945 (Sennheiser). I got the e835 like Ronws did and I love it! I take it to all my band practices. 

I would just like to add to Ronws last post about the bundles, that there are "studio start-up" bundles from several brands such as Focusrite with headphones, audio interface (scarlet), mic cable, and a condenser mic (all focusrite brand) at relatively affordable prices.

Thank you, Gneetap ! It took quite awhile for me to acquire this "collection". I love the e945 - I must admit, one of my favorites !!! If my memory serves me correctly, it cost me about $250.00, but it's well worth the price !

SOMEDAY, I'm going to have to check out the e835.

But in addition to the e945, the Rode M-1 and the EV 767a are my other favorites. Thanks to Robert for his previous "Reviews" on these mics !!!  :) 

I didn't add the others (ergo, "too numerous to mention"), as they simply don't suit my voice..... Those I purchased from some businesses that were closing their doors, and as such, I thought I was getting some good deals. Some are OK, but I rarely use them.

Here's an interesting tidbit about creating your own mic from an old speaker : http://www.ehow.com/how_6588913_turn-speaker-microphone.html

Granted, I don't use them for singing, but they work well for miking drums. I bought a nice set of mics for my grandson's drums, BUT, I also added some old speakers for a little extra enhancement ! Pretty cool IMO ;)

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Aewsome post, Gneetapp.

And for Berabouman, the m-audio is two channel. And unless you plan to record several channels at once, such as a live band, like my brother does, you won't need more than the two channels given. If you just record with karaoke tracks, that is all that you will need.

My brother, a recording professional has a 24 channel input interface because he does record bands, from time to time.

Others have done okay with a sub mic. This is a mic that has analog to digital converter in it. Using that, you would need to use software to monitor through and the latency Audacity has for that is atrocious.
 

That being said, I have recorded well with Audacity, before I switched to Reaper.

I recorded this with Audacity and someone else mixed it for me in their software.

"I Believe in a Thing Called Love" by the Darkness


http://www.box.com/s/43d19dbd80a5e2418dd3

This, I recorded with Reaper and mixed myself.

"Highway Star" by Deep Purple


https://app.box.com/s/em0tqq2maxoxp5kllc7wwz89a986oci7

I am not looking for applause, I just want to show you what can be done.

Here is one that I recorded and mixed in Audacity.

"Dust in the Wind" - 2015 by Kansas


https://app.box.com/s/rthd1ucilvugl6agoe381vp8hg5cpdm8

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for all the replies! I think I am much clearer about what I want now. Since I don't live in the USA I probably will not be ordering from the vocal store, but I'll try to see if I can find anything similar here.

But even as I learn more more questions come!
 

1. What actually goes into the process of "mixing" a track? You see it on the movies all the time where sound engineer adjust this dial or that - what's it really like?

2. How do I know which mic might or might not suit my voice? Do I just try them all in the store?

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Thanks for all the replies! I think I am much clearer about what I want now. Since I don't live in the USA I probably will not be ordering from the vocal store, but I'll try to see if I can find anything similar here.

But even as I learn more more questions come!
 

1. What actually goes into the process of "mixing" a track? You see it on the movies all the time where sound engineer adjust this dial or that - what's it really like?

2. How do I know which mic might or might not suit my voice? Do I just try them all in the store?

Hi Berabourman, I think you should benefit from a search on google about home recording and mixing. I am sure You will find lots of very useful information. Regarding finding the right mic for your voice, it could be difficult if you are a beginner/ unexperienced singer/recording engineer. You want to get the mic that best suits your voice type and the music style you will be recording. So, as you have a small budget to start ($100-200) I would suggest to get an entry-level recording bundle, as the mic would probably be good enough to start your recordings. After a while, as you develop your recording, singing, and listening skills, you can always trade for a better mic. Or just do as Adolph, and start a collection. ;-)

Cheers 

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Bera, I am sorry I have not been able to respond until now.

The basics of what you need to make a decent recording are:

- A DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) or recording software.

- A Microphone.

- An interface.

- Headphones.

Click HERE >>>

Go to "Home Recordings" and see the two home recording kits there by Focusrite:

1. Focusrite iTrack Studio Complete Recording Package for iPad, Mac and PC.

2. Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB Recording Audio Interface Studio Package. (the better of the two)

.. and lots of hours of cussing and pulling your hair out wondering why its not working because you swear you set everything up right... that phase goes on for a couple months, then at some point, you actually do set things up right and your making music. Recording is like making movies... it involves a LOT of moving parts in the technology chain. Lots of settings, lots of making sure that this plugin is plugged into the right plugin, lots trial and error on settings on your DAW and learning how to get good levels (volumes) when you are recording. It is a true skill that requires practice and really learning how the DAW works. If you have the patience to learn how to do it, then you can make music... and its worth it.

Once I finally got the right gear, it took me about 9 months to learn how to make decent recordings. I will admit, I also had a teacher. I took skype lessons with a certified LogicPro X (the DAW that comes with Mac) who was very helpful.

If you have a Mac and have garageband, then you are really in luck. It is a great DAW for hard core beginners... Option #1 above comes with a DAW that is also very basic called "Tape". It appears to be more like an app. for your iPad... not super serious and would have limitations Im sure, but enough to get you going. When you are ready to have a serious DAW, move to LogicProX if you have a Mac or Reaper if you have a PC. For the love to God, don't let anyone at Guitar Center talk you into purchasing ProTools. ProTools is for serious engineers and real professionals and I mean, people that own recording studios and make a living at this... I have purchased ProTools about 3 times and overtime, I was chewed up and spit out... a waste of money. Its just over the head for beginners... I went from Garageband and then graduated to LogicProX... 

For your needs, 1 or 2 above will get you on your journey.. the difference between the two is the interface. The interface is the box that converts the analog signal from your voice/microphone, into a digital signal that the DAW can read. The Scarlett interface on option #2 is a better then option #1. That means it will have more features and sound better, slightly. I use the Focusrite, red scarlett interfaces in my recordings for serious projects and they are AWESOME! I highly recommend. 

 

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Awesome posts ronws and Adolph! Adolph BTW, what a great collection of mics! Congrats! I was wandering how do you like the e945 (Sennheiser). I got the e835 like Ronws did and I love it! I take it to all my band practices. 

I would just like to add to Ronws last post about the bundles, that there are "studio start-up" bundles from several brands such as Focusrite with headphones, audio interface (scarlet), mic cable, and a condenser mic (all focusrite brand) at relatively affordable prices.

Yes, the bundles... you can get them at the TMV World Vocal Gear Store, click "home recording".

www.TheVocalGearStore.com

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Aewsome post, Gneetapp.

And for Berabouman, the m-audio is two channel. And unless you plan to record several channels at once, such as a live band, like my brother does, you won't need more than the two channels given. If you just record with karaoke tracks, that is all that you will need.

My brother, a recording professional has a 24 channel input interface because he does record bands, from time to time.

Others have done okay with a sub mic. This is a mic that has analog to digital converter in it. Using that, you would need to use software to monitor through and the latency Audacity has for that is atrocious.
 

That being said, I have recorded well with Audacity, before I switched to Reaper.

I recorded this with Audacity and someone else mixed it for me in their software.

"I Believe in a Thing Called Love" by the Darkness


http://www.box.com/s/43d19dbd80a5e2418dd3

This, I recorded with Reaper and mixed myself.

"Highway Star" by Deep Purple


https://app.box.com/s/em0tqq2maxoxp5kllc7wwz89a986oci7

I am not looking for applause, I just want to show you what can be done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

:bang::41:

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Hi Berabourman, I think you should benefit from a search on google about home recording and mixing. I am sure You will find lots of very useful information. Regarding finding the right mic for your voice, it could be difficult if you are a beginner/ unexperienced singer/recording engineer. You want to get the mic that best suits your voice type and the music style you will be recording. So, as you have a small budget to start ($100-200) I would suggest to get an entry-level recording bundle, as the mic would probably be good enough to start your recordings. After a while, as you develop your recording, singing, and listening skills, you can always trade for a better mic. Or just do as Adolph, and start a collection. ;-)

Cheers 

Agreed, Gneetapp !

As for myself, I'm thinking of selling some of the mics that don't work that well for me so I can FINALLY try the e835 :cool:

Personally, I would like to see a "Classified" section here on the forum if it's possible. Not only would it make it easier for our membership to buy, sell, and/or trade, but it would also benefit the forum !!!

Additionally, I defer to Robert's post and recommendations :

The basics of what you need to make a decent recording are:

- A DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) or recording software.

- A Microphone.

- An interface.

- Headphones.

Click HERE >>>

Go to "Home Recordings" and see the two home recording kits there by Focusrite:

1. Focusrite iTrack Studio Complete Recording Package for iPad, Mac and PC.

2. Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB Recording Audio Interface Studio Package. (the better of the two)

 

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.. and lots of hours of cussing and pulling your hair out wondering why its not working because you swear you set everything up right...

How I can relate to your comments about "cussing and pulling your hair out" !!!

(The LAST thing I need is to lose MORE hair :angry:)

Anyway, as I added more "components to my "chain" I often found myself wondering whether everything was hooked up properly. Instructions ??? As I think back about the "Antares Vocal Producer", deciphering the instructions seemed like it would necessitate another college degree !!! Not much help at all....

But as I added my new "gear" it turned out that I had everything hooked up properly. HOWEVER, I would make posts and/or contact Robert just to make sure.... The last thing I needed was to "FRY" my entire system.

I'm certainly NOT a sound engineer, nor do I profess to be one. As such, over the years I've made several posts asking for advice. I've searched for several posts where I had asked for advice, but unfortunately could only come up with one : http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/topic/1382-adding-a-samson-airline-77-and-a-sonic-maximizer-to-my-chain/#comment-24087

Robert was kind enough to assist me as well ! Thank you, coach !!!

The bottom line is that's what we're all here for : To help each other !!!

BTW, AWESOME job on "This Life", coach !!!  It KICKS ASS !!! :headbang2:

 

 

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Thank you, Gneetap ! It took quite awhile for me to acquire this "collection". I love the e945 - I must admit, one of my favorites !!! If my memory serves me correctly, it cost me about $250.00, but it's well worth the price !

SOMEDAY, I'm going to have to check out the e835.

But in addition to the e945, the Rode M-1 and the EV 767a are my other favorites. Thanks to Robert for his previous "Reviews" on these mics !!!  :) 

I didn't add the others (ergo, "too numerous to mention"), as they simply don't suit my voice..... Those I purchased from some businesses that were closing their doors, and as such, I thought I was getting some good deals. Some are OK, but I rarely use them.

Here's an interesting tidbit about creating your own mic from an old speaker : http://www.ehow.com/how_6588913_turn-speaker-microphone.html

Granted, I don't use them for singing, but they work well for miking drums. I bought a nice set of mics for my grandson's drums, BUT, I also added some old speakers for a little extra enhancement ! Pretty cool IMO ;)

Hey Adolph, I read many reviews comparing the e835 and e945 and also from the sennheiser website, and they were unanimous in saying that the e945 is way superior, especially because the tight pickup pattern that does an excellent job on avoiding feedback. That is why the difference in the price tag.

Additionally, since you sent me the link on turning speaker into microphones, I think you are gonna love this one. I know I did. Take a listen to the recording they made with the tin can microphone.

http://www.instructables.com/id/The-New-and-Improved-Tin-Can-Microphone/

I agree about the classifieds section, I think it would be useful to many members. I am just not sure how easy/hard it would be to manage it.

Cheers

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HI Guys...

@Adolph Namlik

Thanks Chief... just an unpublished, sneak preview for the friends here at TMV World Forum. I'll publish it more broadly at a later date... 

Ok, regarding a Classified Ads service here... I have spent a lot of time looking into it as I agree that it would be really useful. There is no plugin available at this time for it, but the developer that did at one time, offer a plugin for this CMS system, said he is going to create one for this new update... there was one at one time, but the new updated version of the hosted software we are using, is not compatible with his older code... so we are basically waiting on an update to a Classified Ads plugin... when it is available I will go for it for sure... I think it could be really cool for vocal gear.

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Bera, I am sorry I have not been able to respond until now.

The basics of what you need to make a decent recording are:

- A DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) or recording software.

- A Microphone.

- An interface.

- Headphones.

Click HERE >>>

Go to "Home Recordings" and see the two home recording kits there by Focusrite:

1. Focusrite iTrack Studio Complete Recording Package for iPad, Mac and PC.

2. Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB Recording Audio Interface Studio Package. (the better of the two)

.. and lots of hours of cussing and pulling your hair out wondering why its not working because you swear you set everything up right... that phase goes on for a couple months, then at some point, you actually do set things up right and your making music. Recording is like making movies... it involves a LOT of moving parts in the technology chain. Lots of settings, lots of making sure that this plugin is plugged into the right plugin, lots trial and error on settings on your DAW and learning how to get good levels (volumes) when you are recording. It is a true skill that requires practice and really learning how the DAW works. If you have the patience to learn how to do it, then you can make music... and its worth it.

Once I finally got the right gear, it took me about 9 months to learn how to make decent recordings. I will admit, I also had a teacher. I took skype lessons with a certified LogicPro X (the DAW that comes with Mac) who was very helpful.

If you have a Mac and have garageband, then you are really in luck. It is a great DAW for hard core beginners... Option #1 above comes with a DAW that is also very basic called "Tape". It appears to be more like an app. for your iPad... not super serious and would have limitations Im sure, but enough to get you going. When you are ready to have a serious DAW, move to LogicProX if you have a Mac or Reaper if you have a PC. For the love to God, don't let anyone at Guitar Center talk you into purchasing ProTools. ProTools is for serious engineers and real professionals and I mean, people that own recording studios and make a living at this... I have purchased ProTools about 3 times and overtime, I was chewed up and spit out... a waste of money. Its just over the head for beginners... I went from Garageband and then graduated to LogicProX... 

For your needs, 1 or 2 above will get you on your journey.. the difference between the two is the interface. The interface is the box that converts the analog signal from your voice/microphone, into a digital signal that the DAW can read. The Scarlett interface on option #2 is a better then option #1. That means it will have more features and sound better, slightly. I use the Focusrite, red scarlett interfaces in my recordings for serious projects and they are AWESOME! I highly recommend. 

 

One of the most awesome posts, ever. And I like your song, too. But then, I have always liked your songwriting. Though, I must admit, when I saw the title, I thought it was a cover of "This Life" by Curtis Stigers and the Forest Rangers, the soundtrack song of "Sons of Anarchy."

 

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As for why I got the Sennheiser e835, it was a guy at Guitar Center, believe it or not, who sells more of those than he does other more expensive mics. I did not buy it there. I went to ebay and got it for half of retail.

The Fame CM-1 Condenser mic came with a recording kit that was sent to me by fellow member and grecian angel, akawrd (Thanos.)

Over time, I got the other pieces.

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