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folks, can you help me on this one?

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please advise.

why is it that i can vocalize to a pretty decent c5 when practising my exercises (let's say full-voice arpeggios and syrens) but have less success hitting the same note when singing an actual song?

to put it another way, if one can exercise up to a c5, it dosen't really mean that they can sing a c5 in an actual song. why would that be, assuming there's no consonants to throw me off?

you would think if you can vocalize up to it, you can then sing it. but i'm finding that's not the case. why?

thank you in advance.

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assuming there's no consonants to throw me off?

Harder vowel ? Jumps in pitch ? quick succession of different pitches ? Just a different feeling when approaching the note ?..

Or maybe... Did you try this song before you were able to vocalize up to this note, happen to not be able to it, and then apprehend the note in this song ?

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well it's actually a c5 sharp. the part of foreigner's "i've been waiting for a girl like you." not the "i've been waiting" part....the "yeah waiting." the way he bends the "waiting" is a toughfy. maybe the "yeah" is the trouble spot. also, "won't you come into my life." the "come" is a bitch.

eye of the tiger...the big money note is a c5 on "end."

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"yeah, waiting" the yeah sounds breathy on the original while waiting needs good twang. Changing configurations that fast is probably what is throwing you off. Twang the word "yeah" and you are already there. Or even supertwang the "yeah" and give it a little rattle and then back off the twang a smidge for waiting, which has a clearer vocalisation.

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"yeah, waiting" the yeah sounds breathy on the original while waiting needs good twang. Changing configurations that fast is probably what is throwing you off. Twang the word "yeah" and you are already there. Or even supertwang the "yeah" and give it a little rattle and then back off the twang a smidge for waiting, which has a clearer vocalisation.

folks, what i'm really after here is just because you can hit a c5 in practice, doesn't mean you can can actually sing it in a song. correct?

rob, steve, martin any instructors?

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I'm pretty certain I hit higher notes singing songs than vocalizing scales. Although I personally consider there is a very big gap between hitting a note and singing it :)

I think it psychological. You may feel safer vocalizing, while I feel safer not knowing which note is which.

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Bob, I think what you need to include in your practise routine is singing bits and pieces of songs. Here's an example, done by myself: http://www.box.net/shared/z64kmng1fc. I'm sure other people could give better examples, but hopefully you'll get the idea. Btw. Martin told me that he often practises in a very, very similar manner. And here's another example: http://www.box.net/shared/u5pzizompu

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folks, what i'm really after here is just because you can hit a c5 in practice, doesn't mean you can can actually sing it in a song. correct?

Bob: Depending on the situation, singing a note in a song can be easier than it is in a vocalise, though that is not often the case.

If you are noticing a difference, then the challenge is to create practice exercises that introduce the additional motions which are required for a song. The place to start is with consonants, constructing syllables.

While doing that, examine each sound you make in every syllable, isolate them on their pitches, and sing them in a sustained fashion. For example, in the word 'waiting', there are three vowel sounds. The specific pronunciation of the vowels can make a difference in how resonant (and easy) the sounds are. Find out if the /u/ should be shaded toward /U/ or /oe/ (as in foot) or kept closed, where in the shading of /e/ toward /E/ (eh) and the /i/ toward /I/ is right for you, and discover if your pronunciation of the T is getting in the way.

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jonpall, thanks a lot for that. i do stuff like that, but thanks for the thoughtful post. steve, thanks.

yes, i guess i needed confirmation of the "break it down into smaller pieces approach."

thanks guys...

hey, ever notice how few females post?.... (hint, hint.lol!!)

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Not surprising, Bob, considering were a collection of metalheads and hard rock hippies, even if we individually like different styles of music. Granted, there are a few women in the world that may like the same music, my wife, for example, who alternates between Jethro Tull's Aqualung and Best of the Scorpions in her car's cd player, but she is not a metal singer.

Michele is the only female I know that posts fairly regularly and she did a Led Zep song on her site. Quite well, I might add.

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