Jump to content

Tension under the jaw on high notes

Rate this topic


akarawd
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I've been rebuilding/retraining my voice from scratch and I keep noticing that the muscles under the jaw are relaxed until I reach high notes (around the high C area and above).

1. What causes this ? Swallowing muscles taking over to lift the larynx ?

2. Is this a deterrent for reaching these notes with ease ?

3. Is there any way to relieve this tension ?

I've tried massaging the area while singing and keeping my thumb there but I fear I might have the opposite results.

Thanks in advance and my apologies if the subject has been tackled before,

Thanos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a little surprised no one answered this. I don't think I have the answer but was interested in reading one. I also don't think I've had that problem and wouldn't have much insight, except for what I know about muscles, in general. I know you can strain muscles until they don't want to work or get swollen and won't work. I also know that in some repetitive motions, the muscle(s) will eventually "re-train" by rebuilding. As muscle is torn down from exertion past the previous level of use, the muscle cell rebuilds back denser and/or stronger. One doesn't grow new muscles, just rebuilding old. This is what happens with bodybuilders or any athlete that trains at a specific thing. Now, low number of reps of high resistance or heavy weight, cause the muscle to grow back bigger. High reps of lower resistance or weight cause the muscle to "tone" or get dense, without an increase in cell size. But how to avoid or remediate the discomfort while continuing the activity? Hmm. When it came to lifting weights, which I used to do a lot, I rested a day between workouts. Muscles need approx. 48 hours to recover from stress. Though you can sprain and strain muscles and it can take a week to two weeks to recover from that. The other option is to back of the intensity of whatever it is that you are doing. That's my two cents from my experience with muscle recovery in the sense of weightlifting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply Ron, I too believe the muscles underneath the jaw work like all other muscles as you described - that's why I'm skeptical about massaging and pushing that area.

I don't know if this issue has been beaten to death already, so I apologize - it just seems to me that by achieving this, the whole voice will develop differently - more freely if you will.

Anybody else has this sensation when reaching high notes ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too was expecting an answer x) Oh well, with my limited experience :

What do you mean exactly by under the jaw ? Under the chin ? Or the muscles that are used to open the mouth ? Something else entirely ?

Isn't what you feel actually CVT's bite for edge ?

Massaging releases tension in every muscle, so it should help. If it doesn't (I actually think that if it doesn't it's because there's another tension that you have not yet located that causes these muscles to tense), maybe you could try stretching those muscles, for example looking up putting your head gently backwards (do not overdo this, you want to preserve your neck too, especially if you have back or neck problems :P), maybe contracting those muscles for a few seconds then relaxing them and stretching them a bit farther.

And then, maybe, just moving your jaw around, like a chewing cow, could help you release the tensions, as movement is a great way to do this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeap, under the chin, in the middle there.

I'm not sure bite or edge involves any kind of tension in that area. From what I've practiced with a cvt teacher so far I did not experience it, least for the really high notes.

I'm kinda thinking that maybe it's the extension of a sloppy technique in the rest of the range - if nobody else is experiencing this that is.

Thanks for the reply,

Thanos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The tongue... I wonder how many vocal problems it's responsible for. I do try to keep it relaxed with it's tip

touching the front teeth at all times but on the high notes, I sort of have to fight with it not to rise a bit in the back.

That could be it, couldn't it ? Then again, I was under the impression that was natural.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, after some experiments with this area (trying to reproduce muscular tension under the chin, that is, not area of the voice), the only way for me to have some muscular tension right under the chin is by trying to push the tongue :

forwards with resistance (like pushing the teeth with its tip) which tenses muscles at the most external parts of the chin (the part of the chin closest to the jaw bone) : there isn't tension if there isn't resistance,

downwards and backwards at the same time, or just backwards (but there is then less tension), which tenses muscles around the middle of the part under the chin,

and trying to lift the larynx very very high, though I think the larynx lifting engages the muscles of the tongue too.

In other words, yes, the tongue is probably the root of your problem. Maybe if you just tried to let the tongue in a natural position, it would feel better ? I can't comment any farther, as I haven't had the kind of problem personaly. I'm more of a larynx pusher in the high notes, and the tension under the chin is the least of my problems when I'm choking :P

Edit : added some precisions, and corrected some mistakes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i'm hoping steve or rob chimes in...

do you have a nice open throat and the jaw is comfortably lowered, the tongue tip resting on the lower front teeth? neck shoulders relaxed? posture good? are you vowel modifying as you go up?

i'm telling you...vowel modification is so important. when i get to the b4 and up, i'm taking the "ah" or the "eh" after a slight "oh" to an "oo" as in look and support well too.

....try it!! i'll bet you get up in the "the pocket" easier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got it people, I mentally "let go" of any resistance in the tongue area - instead of "fighting" it - and it worked.

Ronron, Videohere, Ronws thanks for all the input - now I've got a basis to work on and will probably redefine a lot.

Thanks again,

Thanos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got it people, I mentally "let go" of any resistance in the tongue area - instead of "fighting" it - and it worked.

Ronron, Videohere, Ronws thanks for all the input - now I've got a basis to work on and will probably redefine a lot.

Thanks again,

Thanos

when i sing a song, everytime i'm finished with the consonants, i try to remember to get the tongue tip back against the lower front teeth. that tongue can cause more issues than anything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...