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Brett Manning's "Edge" training in CVT terms...

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Jeran
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Hello, All.

I was going through the exercises on my iPod and as I flipped through the Mastering Mix stuff, I saw the "Edge" exercise CD. This is where he has you do vocal fry on scales and a lot of glottal type stuff in an effort to facilitate chord closure. Now, from my experience with both SS and MM, and from what I read, the programs don't do much for full, out-loud rock n' roll singing.

I followed SS for a couple of years, with very little improvement. I find that practicing loud sirens and learning to twang my head voice have dramatically improved my voice. I do use some of the SS stuff once in awhile, and use the scales to practice other, louder exercises. My question is this:

For those of you that study CVT, with Mr. Lunte, with Ken Tamplin, or any of the other (forgive me, SS fans) more "usable" methods, what are the benefits of vocal fry as a chord closure exercise? I thought I might try holding vocal fries on pitches for 15 or so seconds from about middle C to C5, and see if that helps to strengthen the bridge.

Do you think, as a general exercise, this would help?

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Let me quote Chanteurmoderne, a great french vocal proffessor who is inspired by estill, CVT and his own research.

Fry, if correctly done, can provide certain relief to people who press phonation - because it requires a very relaxed, low pressure condition in the glottal area.

This is only true, however, in the low part of the voice where the fry can be initiated without extraneous tension.

So, yes, if used by a professional - it's safe as a vocal rehabilitation tool for a pressed voice, or a voice that has difficulty finding a modal set. Untrained ears often mistake other things for fry, however, and think they're helping when they're not.

The upshot is, if you need vocal rehabilitation for pressed phonation, fry may be a useful tool as long as you know what you're doing and stay in the low part of the voice.

Oh and here is the thread about it http://forum.completevocalinstitute.com/viewtopic.php?t=7198&highlight=vocal+fry

Personally the only time I've used the fry stuff in training was when I had really bad curbing, then I began on fry and then transitioned into curbing on a good vowel.

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Hi all,

I'm a recent convert of the SS and MM method. A friend introduced me to Robert's method and then I introduced myself to Robert. I have had a fair amount of success with Brett MAnning's method's so far, but realized that that method does not offer training for "bigger" vocal styles. I am primarily rock influenced, but I can see how Robert's method's, once understood and internalized, could also apply to "big" James Brown esque singing, or anything that falls into the category of sounding like you've got a huge, raw, monster voice.

That being said, Brett's technique's have taken me very far in the way of understanding my (as in, my personal) vocal mechanism. As someone who religiously pulled up chest up until very recently, Brett's "Light is Right" mantra helped me in understanding that "Light is Not Wrong" if that makes sense. The Edge exercises in question here, I have found, have been very helpful in understanding how little the chords need to come together in order to produce sound.

Obviously, using a TVS (or similar...I only know TVS, but it seems there are related methods)-type coordination asks for more muscle fiber and results (eventually, at least) in a bigger sound, but I did find some help in these last two, and my first two, years of proper singing training.

I'm looking forward to taking the next steps. If Jeran considers TVS methodology as more useable, then I can only expect amazing things of myself in the months and years to come.

Thanks so much for this post, all!!!

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Personally the only time I've used the fry stuff in training was when I had really bad curbing, then I began on fry and then transitioned into curbing on a good vowel.

All: I've found in my own singing and when teaching lessons over the years, that this sort of exercise is very helpful for many voices, and especially those that have been habitually pushed. As an ardent young singer post-voice-change, I fell into the trap of wanting to make that 'big muscular' sound without knowing the right way to do it. It wasn't until 1975 or '76 that I ran across this particular approach to fixing the issue, which worked well for me personally and for the occasional over-enthused student dude.

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Interesting to hear Steven, for me it only was helpful on a really bad vocal day. I just couldn't get a centered curbing no matter how hard I tried and my teacher proposed the fry thing to me just as a way to find the right spot. It worked temporary but their really was no cure for my low energy level that day. I just had to get some sleep and get back on my schedule and bam, curbing worked fine 2 days after. :)

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I totally get it, fc. And many is the singer who thought that a favorite singer was singing a high note heavy and chesty, when it was a modified light note.

But definitely, the path to great highs is bridging earlier and lightening the weight of the air and compensating with vowel color and resonance.

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I totally get it, fc. And many is the singer who thought that a favorite singer was singing a high note heavy and chesty, when it was a modified light note.

But definitely, the path to great highs is bridging earlier and lightening the weight of the air and compensating with vowel color and resonance.

ron, with all due respect buddy, bridging earlier...it's not for everyone. i agree with martin it can be delayed and you can bring some chest up...

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ron, with all due respect buddy, bridging earlier...it's not for everyone. i agree with martin it can be delayed and you can bring some chest up...

I agree with that, too, bob. In fact, I did just that, today. I should probably mention it in the accomplishment thread that you started.

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