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Wise words, and usually that is the thought in my mind. And I end up doing it my way, regardless.

I agree with his thoughts. At some point, as good as the training is, you have to make the song your own and do it your way. Whether you sing it higher or lower or change the vocal melody, which I have done without apology and will continue to do. For example, my ending of "Sweet Child of Mine" is more simple than the original. My ending of "Stairway to Heaven" is a higher note than the original and a cleaner tone. Which doesn't mean it's better. Just different. Which sometimes, the listener cannot get past. It's easy to want to compare to the original and we all do it, to some degree. But I prefer hearing the performing artist's own take on a song. That's why, and others may shoot me for saying so and I will take any hits you want to give me, I really like Celine Dion's version of "Shook me all night long." She did it her way. And it rocked, as far as I am concerned. I liked Sheryl Crow's version of "Sweet Child of Mine." She did it her way. I liked Guns and Roses' version of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" way more than the original. And I'm willing to bet, Bob, I would enjoy hearing you doing "Hot Blooded." Or, "Dirty White Boy."

I also like Hayseed Dixie's baritone bluegrass version of "Highway to Hell." It had it's own unique flavor.

What often happens, though, especially in making recordings, is that any imperfection is highlighted. So, then, the pressure is on to have each recording "perfect." And you can sometimes lose the live feel. And that may be part of what makes my "unique" recording. I have been playing guitar and singing since 1974, with serious concentration on my voice since 1988, with just about none of it being in recording. My first wife had a BA in piano performance and piano pedagogy from the Meadow School of Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas and her piano teacher since middle school was tenured professor Alfred Moulideaux, who was also pianist for the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. And she was one of my best sounding boards. She had perfect pitch and could read sheet music and hear the arrangement in her head. So, I had the benefit of someone with a trained ear helping me.

But she was an astounding pianist because she played her way. I would put up her performance of Rachmaninoff's Concerto #2 in Cm (one of my favorites) against any other artist, dead or alive. Because she played with her heart, aided by the technical skill of being a concert pianist.

Thanks for sharing this, Bob.

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Wise words, and usually that is the thought in my mind. And I end up doing it my way, regardless.

I agree with his thoughts. At some point, as good as the training is, you have to make the song your own and do it your way. Whether you sing it higher or lower or change the vocal melody, which I have done without apology and will continue to do. For example, my ending of "Sweet Child of Mine" is more simple than the original. My ending of "Stairway to Heaven" is a higher note than the original and a cleaner tone. Which doesn't mean it's better. Just different. Which sometimes, the listener cannot get past. It's easy to want to compare to the original and we all do it, to some degree. But I prefer hearing the performing artist's own take on a song. That's why, and others may shoot me for saying so and I will take any hits you want to give me, I really like Celine Dion's version of "Shook me all night long." She did it her way. And it rocked, as far as I am concerned. I liked Sheryl Crow's version of "Sweet Child of Mine." She did it her way. I liked Guns and Roses' version of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" way more than the original. And I'm willing to bet, Bob, I would enjoy hearing you doing "Hot Blooded." Or, "Dirty White Boy."

I also like Hayseed Dixie's baritone bluegrass version of "Highway to Hell." It had it's own unique flavor.

What often happens, though, especially in making recordings, is that any imperfection is highlighted. So, then, the pressure is on to have each recording "perfect." And you can sometimes lose the live feel. And that may be part of what makes my "unique" recording. I have been playing guitar and singing since 1974, with serious concentration on my voice since 1988, with just about none of it being in recording. My first wife had a BA in piano performance and piano pedagogy from the Meadow School of Arts at Southern Methodist University in Dallas and her piano teacher since middle school was tenured professor Alfred Moulideaux, who was also pianist for the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. And she was one of my best sounding boards. She had perfect pitch and could read sheet music and hear the arrangement in her head. So, I had the benefit of someone with a trained ear helping me.

But she was an astounding pianist because she played her way. I would put up her performance of Rachmaninoff's Concerto #2 in Cm (one of my favorites) against any other artist, dead or alive. Because she played with her heart, aided by the technical skill of being a concert pianist.

Thanks for sharing this, Bob.

when i sing, i try to remember to sing safely, and i try to incorporate all of the things i have learned, but i still go into a state of flow and if i get lost in the music and when i'm emoting i'm probably breaking a lot of the rules. power is something that has always come natural to me. like steve fraser has told me, one of my challenges is to learn how to control the power.

for me, singing softer or with more dynamics is very hard because even when i'm singing softer, i sound loud..lol!!!

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when i sing, i try to remember to sing safely, and i try to incorporate all of the things i have learned, but i still go into a state of flow and if i get lost in the music and when i'm emoting i'm probably breaking a lot of the rules. power is something that has always come natural to me. like steve fraser has told me, one of my challenges is to learn how to control the power.

for me, singing softer or with more dynamics is very hard because even when i'm singing softer, i sound loud..lol!!!

I have the exact same thing happening to me, as well. So, in some songs, I have concentrated on singing softer, to have more control. And receive critique that I am singing too soft. So, in the end, we still have to do it our way, whichever way works, but, as you said, safely.

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