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'Sing and See' software

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Nathan
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I remember seeing someone on the forum (I cannot remember who) briefly mention this a few weeks back. I just looked it up now and am wondering whether or not I should purchase it. Seems like a good idea and could be helpful. Just wondered if anyone has had any experience with this product and whether or not it is worth me spending my hard earned £29 on :)

http://www.singandsee.com/

That link takes you to the site for those interested. Just wanted peoples opinions on these types of things. I'm looking for something to help improve my pitching a bit (which will come with my lessons, but if I can speed it up then that is fine by me).

I know of Jaime Vendera's singing into a tuner exercise (I think it is called the intonation exercise, is that wrong?) but I think this could be even better as I can apply it to entire songs or exercises. I am unable to do this with a tuner because, simply, the tuner cannot keep up with the note changes (unless i go. really. really. slow.-ly) and the needle never stays bang on the note (which even Jaime told me is pretty impossible).

If anyone knows of similar software that is potentially better then let me know.

Peace! =]

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Honestly i don't think it's a good idea. Why would you want to replace your ears by your eyes?

Buy yourself a little keyboard and use your ears ;-). 100000x better

Well, maybe you haven´t seen the program but the program contains a keyboard, and even if you see the note that doesn´t make you deaf, no offense. Other useful features are for example that you can record and see in i diagram where your breaks and weak spots are and you can see how high volume you sing every note on.

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I see your point Joshual, but the argument is if I could already hear how off-pitch I was going on certain notes, why would I need to develop this at all. I sometimes feel I am on a pitch when I am actually not (a major issue I need to get over).

So whenever I use my keyboard I hear the note and it sounds right, but people still comment that it seems a little off-tone. Not to the point that it is like a semi-tone off, more like a micro-tone (which is mostly an eastern music thing). You know, like how an A# is rarely at 116.5Khz (which would be the perfect tuning for an A#, at least in one octave of which one I'm not sure). Well I'll be hitting around that 'sweet spot' but always a little off. Which I guess is sort of acceptable, but it could definitely be tighter.

I hope that makes sense but I fear it may not.

Is there any method that you would reccomend to correct this? I've tried ear training programs like that David Lucas Berg thing, but it didn't really work for me. Besides, I have real difficulty hearing myself when singing (even when using a mic, it doesn't sound the same as when I play it back, which is normal as Steven F. has explained to me).

Olem: Thanks for the reccomendation. If I do buy it, I'm probably just going to get the cheapest (basic) option. Has it improved your ability to stay in pitch when away from it? (E.g. gigs, where I'd assume you don't bring a laptop/computer onstage with you).

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I've been using Sing & See for a while. If you're only using it for the pitch guide, I wouldn't bother. It's useful for maybe a minute, to see how on-pitch you are. Beyond that, if you can't control your pitch, there are much better ways to fix it than singing the same note over and over.

However if you buy the full version, it includes a live spectrometer which is brilliant for training, IMO. Here's a 30-day trial version with the spectrometer. Give it a shot:

http://www.softpedia.com/get/Multimedia/Audio/Audio-Editors-Recorders/Sing-See.shtml

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I see your point Joshual, but the argument is if I could already hear how off-pitch I was going on certain notes, why would I need to develop this at all. I sometimes feel I am on a pitch when I am actually not (a major issue I need to get over).

So whenever I use my keyboard I hear the note and it sounds right, but people still comment that it seems a little off-tone. Not to the point that it is like a semi-tone off, more like a micro-tone (which is mostly an eastern music thing). You know, like how an A# is rarely at 116.5Khz (which would be the perfect tuning for an A#, at least in one octave of which one I'm not sure). Well I'll be hitting around that 'sweet spot' but always a little off. Which I guess is sort of acceptable, but it could definitely be tighter.

I hope that makes sense but I fear it may not.

Is there any method that you would reccomend to correct this? I've tried ear training programs like that David Lucas Berg thing, but it didn't really work for me. Besides, I have real difficulty hearing myself when singing (even when using a mic, it doesn't sound the same as when I play it back, which is normal as Steven F. has explained to me).

Olem: Thanks for the reccomendation. If I do buy it, I'm probably just going to get the cheapest (basic) option. Has it improved your ability to stay in pitch when away from it? (E.g. gigs, where I'd assume you don't bring a laptop/computer onstage with you).

The best thing about the software is that it is objective - many times like you said you sense that you are off pitch or you think that you are on pitch and you are not, in this case it helps alot. When you do sirens for example, you can immidiately see if your voice breaks just a little or if you waver. You will hear this also of course if you are sharp but in the beginning you could feel some uncertainty.

After awhile you will improve your hearing ability and recognise pitch and flaws better but if you are a beginner this program will be of great help. I only got the cheapest but will later buy it with the spectograph feature.

It has helped me with pitch control and to smooth out my voice in sirens, but then i am pretty much still a beginner. If you are an experienced and well skilled singer i would think this program is of little help.

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I've been using Sing & See for a while. If you're only using it for the pitch guide, I wouldn't bother. It's useful for maybe a minute, to see how on-pitch you are. Beyond that, if you can't control your pitch, there are much better ways to fix it than singing the same note over and over.

However if you buy the full version, it includes a live spectrometer which is brilliant for training, IMO. Here's a 30-day trial version with the spectrometer. Give it a shot:

http://www.softpedia.com/get/Multimedia … -See.shtml

Thanks so much for this. I'm gonna download that trial as soon as I get back tonight! Thank you! :D

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I think it is something that might be useful for a vocal coach to be able to show a student what the students voice is doing, and with explanation help the student attain and retain pitch through mouth and throat positions, as well as posture and everything else vocal coaches look for to improve a singers voice.

As a tool for someone without a coach, I think it's a bit like using a pipe wrench to adjust your eyeglasses. A pipe wrench is a fantastic tool if your a plumber, but useless for adjusting glasses.:P

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You know i have the same problem, even if i'm hearing well the notes, i'm often little off pitch, but i'm not always off, just with certain vowels or certains songs or a certain part of my voice, it has to deal with propoer technique, and you don't need to get so much technology around you to sing good ;-).

And i always remember that my top favorite singers (Richie Kotzen, Chris Cornell etc...) are always on key on the recordings, but on stage they are also off key too. But honestly i don't care, i prefer to hear someone singing off key but with singing with his heart (or balls it depends lol), than a "perfect pitch guy" with a plastic voice ;-).

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If you're only singing slightly off pitch and you feel you're on pitch, it may well be a constriction problem more than anything else. Effort level work, deconstriction work and support work will all help lots. I'd try all of these before you buy any software and, like many singing teachers, I'd advise against trying to improve pitching using a piano - the well tempered intervals are hard to distinguish easily if the ear is the problem (which it almost never is in my experience - constriciton is almost always responsible for slightly off pitching - but if it is your ear that's a problem, the piano route is probably the least efficient route to go down - try to find some Kodaly classes instead).

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