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    Felipe Carvalho

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    Danielformica

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    VideoHere

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/06/2015 in all areas

  1. I think we should create a new sub-forum called "blessed physiology". Or better yet....."Gods of singing- Just what makes them divine?" Then this entire thread could be moved over there and the "vocal technique" sub forum could be reserved for discussions about technique. After all, technique is the only thing any of us can do anything about anyway.
    3 points
  2. Okay Folks, Here's something that I came up with while driving home last night. If we really want to understand high notes from all angles and a high note could speak, what would it be asking of the body? What would the voice say to you, if for example, it wanted to produce a big, powerful high note? What is really mentally and physiologically going on when you produce a high note? Do we really know? Should we really know? Let's go into this really deeply. To make this really interesting if you care to reply, do it as if you were the high note, not just provide explanations. Take on the p
    2 points
  3. Highnote: Hi Jens Jens: Hi highnote, so what have been up to? Highnote: Not much, chillin some watching some nexflix Jens: Oh thats nice man, what did you watch? Highnote: The walking dead, it's a great show have you seen it? Jens: Yes ive seen it, I didnt like it that much or well the first season was decent. Highnote: Yeah it kindo slows down after the first season your right, so what up you been up to Jens? Jens: Ive been shopping some drank some coffe with friends, other then that not so much. Highnote: Thats great Jens, i gotta go now grab something to eat Cu u later Jens Jens: Ah nice,
    2 points
  4. Well moving from "it is physical" to "whatever it is" is already a improvement. Lets continue: I am not aware of a scientifical demonstration that people sing better due to evolutional changes, or physical attributes for that matter, that's why I asked you before: What did you observe directly, besides the singing? If its just the singing, all these statements have the same content: - Some people sing good because of evolution. - Some people sing good because they are talented. - Some people sing good because of Odin's will. - Some people sing good and I have no clue why. I would just say th
    2 points
  5. "What if your high notes are thin, harsh, etc and you have to eq and reverb the hell out of it to get a reasonable(?) production. Maybe you would be more effective as a baritone. Daniel is good example on this forum of a good tenor voice." 1. You train technique and adjust the problems; 2. If the goal is classical singing, maybe, but the main probably is achieving projection. On a mic I can make a low or high notes sound deep, without it, things change a lot; 3. Dan was classified as a Baritone actually. Also. The evolution theory is accepted and verifiable, yes, since it predicts and mode
    2 points
  6. Let's look at it another way for a moment. Let's take a a group of 10 or so professional singers with seemingly superhuman abilities. For the sake of the experiment the group should include subjects of both genders, multiple ethnicities, and should represent the general population in terms height and weight variations. In other words this list could include Prince, Chris Cornell, Otis Redding, Aretha Franklin, Pavarotti, Sarah Brightman, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Adele, Emmylou Harris etc. Ok. Now let's say that science was able to observe some obscure physical attribute that made all of thes
    2 points
  7. remember the A4 is not about muscling up or more push its about release. once you get that you will be able to do more. so make it a little smaller first then start to bring in the power
    2 points
  8. It is because of the following variables: 1). Exposure to music at an early age. 2). Favorable vocal fold and vocal tract physiology. 3). Good neuro connections for hearing and matching frequency. 4). Good neuro connections for hearing and tuning formants (singing vowels). 5). Neurolinguistics, or the ability to articulate with dexterity and precision. 6). The person's native language, which influence what articulate movements the can do easily and which are more difficult. Also the vowels that are more intuitive VS. not, due to primary language advantages or disadvantages. 7). Work ethic... i
    1 point
  9. highnote- i like it when you dont put so much pressure on me, why do you keep pushing me if you keep doing that im gonna leave you and then you will be left with the not so highnote. me-absolutely you win im sorry for always pushing you into things you dont like. i promise to back off and be more considerate of you since im so much stronger . highnote-youre kinda a buly me-im so sorry i will lay off and alllow you to be as you wish highnote-thank you so much, xoxox
    1 point
  10. - Some people sing good and I have no clue why. - Felipe Yes, genius in its simplicity. You will never be able to provide a thorough work up of other singers physiology to test all of the facets of their conditioning. Leading brain scientists still do not fully understand the brain. They don't get it, so why would we?
    1 point
  11. Daniel shouted, used falsetto, and pushed middle voice and did it all wrong the first time around. (His own words). He misapplied every vocal technique oppositely of what he currently does on his road of vocal training. You hear Daniel now and you think he is a natural tenor. That is a pretty strong argument against the ability to detect born with it talent. Further complicating things, some listeners might have preferred the sound of a straining baritone over a natural tenor. On average, I prefer Bruce Springsteen over Steve Perry, for example, so it is theoretically possible I'd have preferr
    1 point
  12. Me too... and most people. That is pretty standard and to be expected... that is my point with this video. Hope it doesn't feel like Im just fire hosing with videos here but, I have produced over 400 of these lectures and demonstrations, some on YouTube at my channel (please subscribe) and the others can be seen in the TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing"... but to the point, if the video is addressing that very idea, then, I'm going to embed it in here because that is the purpose of the video. And of course, videos communicate well.
    1 point
  13. I say this because people actually did look into the high profile singers to figure out what exactly was going on and the differences where found to be mostly functional (what they did), instead of physical (how they were). nice!!!!!
    1 point
  14. @Lien well where did you actually observe all that? Did you measure vocal folds size? Larynx size? Etc? Did you compare results with other studies? What I want you to realize is that you observed people that have this natural thing going, yes, we all have, but you did not actually observe that it was due to physical differences, its a "what if?" . I say this because people actually did look into the high profile singers to figure out what exactly was going on and the differences were found to be mostly functional (what they did), instead of physical (how they were). Using magnetic resonance it
    1 point
  15. Listen closer to that clip ...... The sound is thin and tight .......... Powerful yes ........ But it is not thick up top......... then Listen to Blackfoot. When he goes to an A4...That is thick and Beefy ...... also entirely different than what John is doing or Queensryche does. ( My wife has been listening to Queensryche the last few days)
    1 point
  16. Another fact that people miss is this ............. You may perceive john as having a big and full High voice but it is not........ It is just closer to his lower sound.........Us guys with a lower center hear a bigger difference in our sound and try to make the top thicker..............Wrong ........ we need to make the bottom thinner to get a more consistent sound..... And when we do ......... we will have MORE of a range choice than John.
    1 point
  17. I listened to your friend John....... He does sound pretty good............ But I do have one thing to say........... When your speaking voice is centered around A3 you may have an easier time of singing between G4 and C5 . My speaking voice is centered at G2 .............. Another thing is having a practice area where you can experiment without interuption of some casual remark that sets you back 3 or 4 years.................... Case in point...... I have been working on "House of the Rising Sun" I am just getting that A4 to not sound like Mickey Mouse on steroids............Trying some new
    1 point
  18. I want to learn about this since its new to me. What part of our physiology creates these limitations? What exactly are these limits?
    1 point
  19. You're saying the more things you can do, the better you get period. If Lennon could sing like Pavarotti and Dio and Lenny Kravitz would he be better artist? I'm saying sometimes I believe the less things you can do, the better you are as a cohesive vocal artist. Successfully imitating every sound that ever existed, does not result in cohesion or identifiable sounds. Of the singers on this forum, the most identifiable to me in a blind test: are Ronws, Rob, MDEW, and Bzean (you've probably never heard him). Do they have the most mainstream palatable voices when covering 'X' artist? Probably no
    1 point
  20. All great advice, from very knowledeable people. I look up Dan, and Benny, Felipe, all of these great teachers (can't name them all). But..... There is still something to be said for exercising the full voice (after you have warmed up) full out and trying to take it as high as you possibly can without concerning yourself with bridging into anything. Just run it up and as you ascend "think in" releasing weight with the shape of your throat (vowel). the vowel will take you up if it's the right one or shade of one. Run it up hard......can't get past E4 or F4?....there's always tomorrow..... Power
    1 point
  21. As Daniel and Rob already pointed out this is usually a problem of pushing too much mass through the passaggio. Actually A4 is a very typical "breaking point" when you do that because from what I know most guys can "push" their raw chest voice pretty much up to A4 if they have good support. However, if you do it like that the difference between your head voice and this heavy chest voice will be too big to get a smooth transition. Thus, the most probable answer is, that you are not actually bridging into head in the E4/G#4 area, you have just learned to push your chest to that point without bre
    1 point
  22. Aravid, as you gain more strength in your head voice musculature, you will find it gets easier. A lot also depends on whether you have dropped off some weight as you head up there. If you bring up too much weight, you will simply get stuck. You need to modify the throat shape (vowel) and create space in the back of the throat to allow you up. I am always having to remind myself to drop the weight as I ascend and keep the throat open.
    1 point
  23. my most common answer to this(without hearing you) is you probably are not singing through the first bridge correctly so around A and Bb shits gonna get messed up. my advice would be bring down the feeling of the c#5 to the g4 as much as you can and see if it balances out.
    1 point
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