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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/28/2017 in all areas

  1. Before you totally write off this article you'll have to admit: karaoke is fun! If you haven't yet had the experience of blasting out vocals to your favorite songs with your friends then you are missing one of life's greatest experiences. If this is you, stop reading right now and make a date with your friends to hit up the local karaoke bar this weekend. With a little bit of practice (okay, maybe A LOT of practice) this could be you: What about those who still have a fear of performing in front of people? Well, that's why the home karaoke system was invented. Designed for
    2 points
  2. I have noticed that the most lead singers of the bands I like (that would be rock and metal) have quite large lower jaws and wide faces - think David Coverdale, Steven Tyler etc, . In contrast I have a smaller than average (probably) lower jaw and relatively narrow face. Will this have an impact on my tone? I think I have a quite a thin tone. I started singing to emulated my heroes and it would be gutting to think that I'm never going to achieve a decent rock voice because I just don't have the necessary physical attributes. Range is not an issue and I don't have a particularly loud voice but
    1 point
  3. It probably matters but so does everything else and there aint much you can do about it one way or the other. No need to give it any thought. Bottom line, there are ALL kinds of great rock tones and you can develop your own particular tone. Every singer, including Coverdale and Tyler, have strengths and weaknesses. A thicker or rounder tone like a Jorn Lande, Jim Morrison, Peter Steele, Ian Astbury (or Muddy Waters!) has a certain type of strength built into it and its great, BUT it can sound "blocky" and it might not be as agile as a lighter voice. It will sound great on certain types of
    1 point
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