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  1. 2 points
    Bzean123

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Wow, that's so sad. RIP Adolph. Felipe I'd be glad to add my voice to whatever you want to do.
  2. 2 points
    kickingtone

    Can I start learning singing at 30

    ok. I think that the very first and most important thing is to stop finding your voice cringeworthy. Learning to sing is about noticing, hearing and bringing out what is good, expressive and interesting in your voice. You do that by training. Anybody who tells you that "you don't have a singing voice" when you are starting out, most probably lacks imagination. You mustn't become one of those people. I cannot hear anything in your sample to suggest that you "don't have a singing voice". The vast majority of us develop "singing voices" through training. Go for it!
  3. 2 points
    kickingtone

    Bridge area notes

    Here's another consideration. The attitude and shape of your vocal tract is very important, which is why some vowels work better than others in certain situations. Resonance is "sound build-up" due to favourable vocal tract geometry (not extra effort). It is resonance that produces fuller sound without getting shouty. When you sing, you are continually tuning the vocal tract geometry for resonance, according to the pitch and timbre that you want. Where the tuning is less accurate, there may be a tendency to try to compensate by pushing the sound out (getting shouty), or limiting yourself to softer sounds. You can experiment and practise getting a relaxed and fluid vocal attitude, and finding good resonant configurations. Experiment. Play around with different sounds/noises. See where you feel them resonate. Bridge of the nose? Eyes? Tip of the nose? Back of the mouth? etc. etc. Play around, and get relaxed with the configurations. That will start to reduce the effort and shoutiness.
  4. 2 points
    MDEW

    Bridge area notes

    The first thing to do is change the idea of HITTING the notes to singing the notes. You have to lighten up a bit in this area. There are 2 main muscle groups in the Adams apple that control the voice. One set for thickening the cords and one set for stretching. The thickening set is stronger than the stretching set. You have to back off a little so the two sets can work together. There are several ways to help balance things out. Vowel modification...Some vowels work better in this area. Think lower to sing higher.....Like when someone is using a pulley to lift something heavy. You pull down on one end to lift the object on the other side of the pulley. So bend you knees a little and drop into the higher notes. You can think of the notes being farther away instead of higher. Or you can think of the notes as getting smaller and tighter instead of higher.
  5. 2 points
    MDEW

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    What is the difference between formal training and training yourself? Read a few interviews from these guys and you will find out that they either started out at a young age or Learned from other musicians and singers and worked on sounding good. The difference is in wanting to sound better and working at it. From an interview in guitar Player Magazine: Tommy Shaw "GP: Were you copping licks off records and radio? Tommy: Right. It was more fun trying to figure out "I Want To Hold Your Hand" and "I Saw Her Standing There" than to take those lessons. By this time I knew my basic chords. There were some older guitarists on my side of town, and I got to know many of them. I would go and try just monkey-see monkey-do, which was always a lot easier. I was never a very good student until long after I got out of high school. It took me that long to realize the importance of having somebody who knows teach you something. GP: Was it your R&B background that gave you an appreciation for playing behind vocals?Tommy: When I was a little blue-eyed soul brother I learned how to do the scattin' stuff kind of like George Benson does, where you play and sing the same notes. I really got into that. It's a lot more than just cranking out riffs on the guitar because you're singing in unison, or in harmony, with your playing. It used to be a trademark of mine back in the old days." I would say singing in unison with a guitar riff is a pretty good workout wouldn't you? A nice way to train the voice? Jeff Scott Soto from Wikipedia "Having a keyboard in the house growing up, he taught himself by ear how to play his favorite songs on the radio but it wasn't until middle school where (playing trumpet) he learned to read music. Using this new technical knowledge, he began fronting his first band at the age of 12." Playing trumpet you learn breath control. One of the fundamentals of structured lessons. So, He first taught himself....That does not mean he was born with it. That means he worked on it. Dio: Wiki "His family moved to Portsmouth from Cortland as part of his father's service in the U.S. Army during World War II[11] and they resided there for only a short time before returning to Cortland. Padavona listened to a great deal of opera while growing up, and was influenced vocally by American tenor Mario Lanza.[12] His first formal musical training began at age 5, learning to play the trumpet.[12] " "Despite being known for his powerful singing voice, Padavona claimed to have never received any vocal training.[15] He instead attributed his singing ability to the use of breathing techniques he learned while playing trumpet.[16] In an interview from hammer magazine: "Was music in your blood? “There were no musicians in the family whatsoever, but due to Italian culture music was embedded in the town. I grew up listening to a lot of opera, which really affected my singing style.” So you have someone who is learning music and playing trumpet from the age of 5 and listening to Opera. A natural born singer? Not really. Someone who was singing opera from the age of 5 and who learned breath control AND had formal MUSIC training from that time on. A childhood of conditioning to be a singer. Not natural born.
  6. 2 points
    Hi everyone, I've always loved to sing but I've always been shy to show it to the world. I had singing lessons in the past but once I started a university degree I stopped singing and focused on my degree. I am now stable in my job but this passion for singing has never gone away. Could you give me your feedback please? Thank you so much, this means the world to me. I have a youtube video singing a capella: And also some covers on SoundCloud:
  7. 2 points
    Lovely voice, awesome, more!!
  8. 2 points
    (Nice background story.) I'd say that practically all songs are challenging. If you are not challenged, you either don't get the song, or you are not working hard enough. Anyway, to give a credible performance the way you did, and to do it a cappella (nowhere to hide), would definitely challenge a lot of singers. I'm hearing more heady tones, and less of the "darker mezzo" sound. I can hear the darker rich mezzo tones "lurking" in your voice, but you don't really bring them out? Maybe I am biased. All my favourite female singers use that mezzo sound. (You in London? Brexit just took a nasty turn with the permanent status application thing.)
  9. 2 points
    I only listened to the first one; sound OK, its in tune and you lift the notes well enough, your voice type is of similar to Adele I would say, A dark mezzo. Try something a bit more challenging like rolling in the deep or fire in the rain or something
  10. 2 points
    Hi Marvin, Why make a comment that makes sense and then put in a link that has nothing to do with singing? If you are a real person and want to improve your singing. Look into "The four Pillars of Singing" Taught by Robert Lunte. Binny90, I like the song. It has as much potential as any other song. Keep up the good work. If you do want to improve your singing, The main thing is to practice scales to get your voice used to changing pitches and recognize when you are singing off pitch. Sing a little louder with feeling.
  11. 2 points
    @Robert Lunte I believe you are already training and teaching this stuff. Tongue root tension usually creates the "knödel" or "kermit the frog" sound.
  12. 2 points
    @MDEW The aryepiglottic muscle seen in your picture can't really create the narrowing of the epilarynx simply because it's too weak and sometimes it's even absent.
  13. 2 points
    @Felipe Carvalho I just reviewed the video by Obert and the book by Fink. And you are right that what Fink talks about happens a bit lower. He calls it the "median thyrohyoid fold" (also mentioned in the paper MDEW posted). In the video it actually sounds very close to "knödel" when it's markedly - so it makes sense it's tongue root tension. So you have the tongue root tension and epilaryngeal narrowing or both at the same time. And if you do it extremely you'll probably end up doing a convincing Louis Armstrong or Christina Aguilera "growl".
  14. 2 points
    Hi Felipe, I can recommend you look into "Laryngeal Biomechanics" by B. Raymond Fink. He argues that the larynx works as a folding mechanism (he calls it "plication" - plica is latin for fold) and not a sphincter mechanism. Firstly because there are no sphincter muscles in the larynx and secondly that the closing (twang or narrowing) of the airways is a result of "bulging" or "folding" of the structures. This was published in 1979 and has gone a bit under the "radar". I mentioned this at an Estill course about 7 years ago and also on this forum. In regards to the discussion of the tongue groove. This is done by the genioglossus. And the effect is a fixation of the hyodbone which stabilizes it and therefore other intrinsic muscles can close of or narrow the airway. The isolated "bulging" of the root of the tongue seen in the presentation is most likely a "folding" of lymphatic (Lingual Tonsils) and adipose tissue just behind the tongue according to Fink. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lingual_tonsils#/media/File:Slide7ttt.JPG
  15. 2 points
    There is an adjustment you have to make yeah, the vowels need to change a bit, space in the pharynx increases, back of the tongue lifts a bit and soft palate also lifts. I did this video a while ago to address exactly this issue: Forgive how red I look here On this position, the spectra will appear more uniform and H3/H4 will start to peak as you get more control over it and start to use more intensity. It's covering. But I would also say this. I believe that learning this is very useful but don't look at it as an "improvement of resonance", it's just a different approach. As I show in the end of the video you can use different strategies that are equally valid and may very well sound better depending on what you are singing.
  16. 2 points
    Dude at least try to make some sense. Some good quality trolling would be cool but this is just too boring...
  17. 2 points
    Yeah the statement is a bit silly when we take it at face value. No one is born a singer obviously, we can observe newborns and their vocal capabilities are rather restricted due to lack of coordination and simply not having a mature enough body. During growth slowly the skill for speech is acquired and perfected. Probably during this stage our experiences with music, singing and how our parents deal with us can have a huge influence. There are also personality aspects, certainly someone that is more creative, has more intelligence, or just downright loves to sing, will have an easier time to learn. How can we address all of this and know who is who before learning happenings? I don't think we can. And another way to look at it, is that people that have an easier time to learn, learn it *faster*. We could very well say that Talent = speed on getting results. And if you don't learn at the same speed, you have to put more time to it. I don't think there is a way to predict who is talented and it seems to me that effort can to a reasonable degree tilt this equation. Another aspect to this is that singing involves more than one skill. Sometimes people are not very talented with music in general due to lack of exposition early on, but once that barrier is overcome it flows nicely. Sometimes the person might have great musicianship and sensibility but lack the control to express what is in their minds. Due to all this I think that talent matters but you can only know how talented you are by actually trying. Often also, the fear of realizing this *potential* to whatever it may be, prevents a lot of people from giving a shot and truly commiting to learning.
  18. 2 points
    MDEW

    So I Saw This On A Youtube Comment

    I saw a video about a deaf person who wanted to learn how to play music. As would be expected most teachers did not want to take her on and colleges would not accept her in the music programs. How do you teach a deaf person to recognize and reproduce pitches? One teacher did take her on and accepted her in a college course. I think she now has a PHD in music. First she started by Touching the walls of the studio to feel the different vibrations and the "Beat" of the music to get an idea of rhythm and syncopation. They ended up inventing a device that would give off a color that would correspond to different pitches and vibrations.She learned to imagine these colors while feeling the vibrations of sound. So, you can teach people to do things that others would think is impossible. I think being born with a natural talent is BS. You may be born with a natural desire to improve and work on your talent, or rather to pay attention and change the things that do not sound, feel or look right or correct to you. My brother had a desire to sing at a young age. To me he is a better singer than anyone else I have heard. People think he was born a natural singer, but I know he worked on every song he sang. If there was something he did not like about it he would work on it more. Even if he did not have formal training he did hang out with a LOT of different singers. I am sure the question was asked "How did you do that? and "How can I do that?". Or suggestions from other singers "You sounded a little off there. Try this." It was not that he opened his mouth and a beautiful expressive voice came out. I have had to "Work" on my voice, and I continue to work on it. I have plenty of work to do but I am way better now than I was 3 years ago and I have been "singing" since I was a toddler.
  19. 1 point
    Kitten13

    Singing like Ronnie James Dio

    I worked on Dio’s crew. That man was loud!! Sometimes when we there were several acts on the bill, Ronnie did his soundcheck last. They always had to pull his vocals back. And effortless. I definitely go with mutant. And unlike some singers he got better the longer he was on tour. They sometimes booked him 4 nights in a row. You don’t see that with other acts.
  20. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Great idea. I’m in.
  21. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Thank you bro, think I will have something by next week.
  22. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

  23. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    I'm in for sure. what do you have in mind? singing or VO... I'm open.
  24. 1 point
    RNBJR

    Bridge area notes

    I am working on my singing and have been taking lessons. My issue - I seem to do okay with head voice when I go above G4. However, when I try to see in the F4, G4 area on certain songs, it comes out “shouty” and harsh. I can hit the notes fine, but I am not getting quality. If it is a softer, quieter song, I don’t have this issue. I have this issue when trying to do fuller sounding notes in this area. I would greatly appreciate any feedback anyone cares to give. I am not a great singer yet and am trying to learn. Thanks!
  25. 1 point
    I like that cleverly disguised cut in the middle.
  26. 1 point
    ooops looks like i have lost my crown Sound all right for your voice type! like the extra bit (different from original) you put on the voice in the middle and nearer the end Where did you record it? Are you in a band?
  27. 1 point
    What caught my attention here was the statement that modern day tenors tend to emphasize the SIXTH as the dominant harmonic. I recall an argument in which someone was trying to convince me that asymmetric vocal fold closure (due to high closed quotient) was critical for full projection, and that that is why the THIRD and FIFTH harmonic are dominant. Well, that is not consistent with what we have here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzGITC_PRWw (I am aware that Livigni has done a video on the "importance of" the closed quotient, but I still think that the science behind it is shaky.)
  28. 1 point
    kickingtone

    Vocal fry while singing a note?

    One cause may be lack of lubrication in the vocal folds and larynx. I am not a vocal coach or instructor, but what I have experienced myself is that lubrication is not the same as hydration, so simply drinking a lot of water may not deal with the situation, and may in some case worsen it. Lubrication requires a proper balance of moisture and minerals. I am not a fan of supplements, so, I personally like to pay attention to everyday diet and watch for what improves or worsen my sound. Diet is very personal. How much water you need will depend on what you eat, your alcohol intake, whether you smoke, etc. Then you have to make sure that the mineral and sugar intake (especially salt) is balanced with the amount of water, because minerals and sugars are what hold the water in place in the cells. Excessive water can cause the cells to dilute and leak, losing the benefit of the hydration. So, be careful with advice to drink gallons of water every day. A lot of your water intake could come from fruit and veg already, and how much is needed varies from person to person. If so, you wouldn't want to follow the same advice given to someone who drinks 10 pints of beer a day, and has no fruit or veg. (Personally, I think that current popular advice assumes a pretty bad diet, and is unsuitable for people with a reasonable diet.) The fry sound may not be acceptable in classical singing, but I do come across it from time to time with some accomplished contemporary singers, although it is not constant (more occasional). However, if it is caused by lack of lubrication, I would imagine that it could cause damage in the very long term, if not attended to. I very much doubt if you have any vocal damage right now, though.
  29. 1 point
    Starting from 1:00-1:11
  30. 1 point
    kickingtone

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    Examples? Videos? Interviews? That would be handy... Part of the problem I have noticed, and it is not only among professionals, is that people often like to hide the hard work, and then "step out into the limelight glistening and glowing with 'talent'...". Maybe it is pragmatic marketing? Maybe they don't want trolls circulating the fact that they are "human". Fans like to believe that their heroes "wrote a number one hit in 3 minutes flat while in a fit of rage and then sang it perfectly in one take..". I think that marketing pressures perpetuate these myths and the idea of that you may be one of the "lucky ones" who "just sing" and chart-topping stuff flows out at once. As one lucky person said, "the more I work my bollox off, the luckier I get".
  31. 1 point
    MDEW

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    I have seen several cases of an artist/musician/'singer confronting the comment "such a natural born talent" and the reply/look on the face says "Natrural? I worked like hell on this "Natural" talent." Learning, improving, training never stops. If you are taking lessons and the training stops when you walk out of the Teacher/coaches studio....then don't blame the teacher.
  32. 1 point
    kickingtone

    AUDIATION: the ignored skill?

    AUDIATION "Audiation" is "visualization, but with sound." It is the process of imagining and feeling music only in your mind, without any external stimulus. Some people have clear crisp imagination of music, while other people can only manage vague, fuzzy sounds. And among those who have clear imagination, some can only imagine a single melody, while others can apprehend harmony and a mix of instruments. Ability to AUDIATE has an enormous impact on musicality, musical creativity, and the approach to singing, learning and discussing technique. People who AUDIATE well may take it for granted that everyone does it well, and those people for whom AUDIATION is dormant or weak may think that is the norm. The two types of people may find it difficult to agree on "best practice" in vocal training without knowing what is behind their disagreement. Simple example: Singer asks how he can learn to keep in step with the music. He says that he often ends up one or two beats off the beat. In reply, my recommendation assumed that he could audiate. I told him to pick a key percussion instrument and mimic it in gaps in the music. i.e SING then do taa-taa-ta-taaa SING ta-ta SING....etc. That way he will better feel and become familiar with how the vocals fit in. Then he can pick another instrument, etc. to get as deep an understanding as he wanted. The approach requires him to hear the other instruments in his head (alongside his own vocals) to be able to anticipate all of them on the fly. He is basically singing less than the music he is imagining, which takes care of the phrasing issue. (Conductors do this. They can pick any point, hear where any instrument is supposed to be, and correct it if it is not there. I also remember training with a Ghanaian drummer, who would shout out the part of another drum if it was off the beat, while he was drumming his own part. Such people clearly have very well-developed AUDIATION skills because they can feel and hear the music ahead of the real sound.) The other recommendation on the thread (which surprised me) was "get out a metronome and practise against that". Obviously, these are different approaches, and I have to confess I don't understand the metronome method. I don't know what the metronome is doing that the music is not doing in the first place. And, if the metronome does help in some way, how the method helps when you take the metronome away in a live situation. POINT IS: Once you are aware of the importance of AUDIATION, you can develop it by paying attention to it and practising. You can build clarity and depth into how you imagine sound, music, singing etc. This helps in all aspects of musicality, including musical composition.
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    Thank you so much for the feedback @sideshow! I will try something more challenging!
  35. 1 point
    @kickingtone my previous reply on intention: Already covers the aspect of "intended" application. To make it more clear. It does not matter if a given technique was developed by the bedouin with the intention of calling a camel in the middle of the desert, if it sounds appropriate and on par with material that is considered high quality on the style being performed, that's what will matter. Just a perception matter, intention is slave to the achieved result. And the same applies to cultural or social history, it is irrelevant unless it leads to practical insights. Example: If something was used as a "call", you can infer it was loud. The relevant information you can derive is that it was "loud". A sound sample is still much more effective when available. @MDEW I would say that if you want to bring the discussion to practical ideas: such as sensations and references of execution, then yeah not having the ability to execute what you are talking about makes your argument very frail. Which is not a surprise to anyone, it's just that people don't talk about it because it's more comfortable to pretend everyone is being taken seriously on all aspects, aka being "nice". However, mechanical aspects that can be verified with visual information and, to some degree, perceptual evaluation, are less dependent on the skill to execute something.
  36. 1 point
    ... audio sample sort of reminded me of Morrissey... anyways, carry on Gents... smart posts.
  37. 1 point
    MDEW

    Review of Twang and Squillo Research

    You probably already use it as part of your '"larynx Dampening" and keeping the "Buzz" or Vibration at the lips. The important thing is that now you can be aware of it. Once you gain awareness of something it get easier to recognize when it is happening and you can then use it on purpose. The use of the tongue root idea will make the voice brighter and add higher harmonics. From what I have tried with it, it also helped to keep the vocal folds together around the passaggio area. But, I have not been able to experiment much. It may also have an effect on other muscles that are attached to the vocal tract.
  38. 1 point
    Not only the level of compression but the type of compression also. Breath compression, cord compression and "false fold compression. Not to mention placement, And laryngeal position. The tone is more to the whistle or tube resonance for the classical counter tenor and more towards a cord vibration "Buzz" for the contemporary(of course this does depend on the artist and genre.
  39. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    Pitch Apps

    A good way you can work on it is to practice diatonic scales in this manner, say you are doing Cmaj: On the instrument of your choice play the Cmaj (chord) then 12345 (C, D , E, F ,G), singing along to it. Then just the chord, Cmaj, but now sustain the chord as you sing the 12345. Then just the root note, sing 12345. Then just sing 12345. Then you can try the same using either the maj3rd or the 5th as the reference. Record and listen if you are being accurate. Or then do the whole scale. Often after you work a bit on major scales, the rest of the modes follow. Perhaps working on harmonic minor scale is a good idea too. Other prime scales, in my opinion, only if you are planning on composing and want to do some weird sounding stuff. Interval training can be very useful if you intend on harmonizing. In special learning major and minor 3rd, 4th and 5th is rather useful. You can do this by forcing yourself to *recall* the sound. Play the interval jump, remember it in your own mind both with the sound of the instrument as well as if you were singing (imagine it). Look at another interval or distract yourself, try to recall it, check to see if you did it right, probably fail, do it again from the start. And contrary to coordination training, when constructing aural memory, the more you fail at it (while doing a genuine attempt of course), the better. On all of these, keep it playful, keep it loose. If you fail just take another listen, don't try to measure things too much or constrain your practice in order to have just good repetitions.
  40. 1 point
    I found this cool video that shows two of the consonants Ive been using: Curiously I use similar sounds to the cold drink AHH for focus and projection training. Its just not carried so far.
  41. 1 point
    MDEW

    Review of Twang and Squillo Research

    There are a lot of teachers out there who use the idea of "Twang" to train cord closure and managing the "Passaggio". Until now the idea of twang was described as a movement of the epiglottis. From the video we have found that it is not the movement of the epiglottis that is responsible for the sound. The vowel AH moves the epiglottis in the manor previously described as the source of the sound but the Ah vowel by itself does not have the sound. I bring this up because there are some teachers who insist that they are not using twang but they promote a "Bright AH" vowel to train the passaggio. The "Bright AH" is made by the same movement of the tongue root in the video. The ideas used to "Find" the twang are "Witches cackle", a "Bratty voice" or a "Whiney" voice or "Cry like a baby". I believe that these sounds involve the two distinct positions in the video. Some use the tongue root and some use the narrowed pharynx that cuts off the piriform sinuses and some are a combination of both. We still do not know what else within the larynx is being effected by these positions(TA, CT, arytenoids, etc.) but we have no conscious control over them anyway. Those who have trained their voice to "Mix", "Cover" or "Turn" through the Passaggio have found a coordination that works for them. When passaggio is reached the trained singer rearranges the vocal tract or adds the needed breath pressure automatically. In other words the trained singer reacts in the way he was trained. One of the reasons that someone like Michael Trindle can believe that he is NOT using any modification or other movement while demonstrating his technique and the sound is to some obviously Modified or darkened, He automatically darkens the voice when reaching the passaggio. It feels to him like he is doing nothing because it is now a natural response to him. Having an idea that a movement of the "Tongue root" can produce this "Twang" or "Squillo" or one of these sounds which aids in the "Passaggio" gives another way to approach the "Passaggio" and train it. The tongue is a muscle that you can consciously control and does not rely on other muscles. It does not need breath pressure to coordinate or a "sound" that you need to achieve to move it. Along with this, the Constrictor muscles of the larynx are also muscles you can consciously control without interference from other muscles. People were trying to train the Passaggio by Achieving a certain sound that DOES involve other muscles that effect the sound in ways that are undesirable in a finished voice and not knowing which action was causing the results. Another way that they were trying to get the same effect was by "Breath Pressure" and the Bernoulli effect, Having the vocal passage "Narrow" on its own in response to "Appoggio" or support from the Breath and a "Relaxed" throat. Still, achieving this was brought about by an expected sound and an unconscious movement. Not a conscious reconfiguration of the vocal tract. Whatever else is happening with the Tongue root that "HELPS" achieve singing in this "passaggio" area I do not know. But from Experiments (From a guy who has been having trouble with a decent sound in the passaggio) I can tell you that this Tongue root action does help and it is controllable by a conscious movement. If you have read through all of that.... Try the tongue root idea with a Soft but full tone from D4 to A4 . and see if the mix comes in with a full sound without having to get louder or having to cover or over darken the tone. I still have not had time to fully test this, but I have tried a few songs that I was having trouble with and when I started to hit a wall I added more tongue root and was able to stabilize the note and reach a mix. The tongue root seems to be independent from the "Narrowing" of the pharynx and the position of the Larynx. Although it does seem that a lower larynx makes the tongue root a little easier to control.
  42. 1 point
    To the point: There are some *smart* voice teachers displaying before and after of their students as a sign of improvement and that are deliberately faking results and exploiting recording conditions to create the illusion that their singing method produces *huge* voices. In this particular case I saw, the teacher compares a dry and very clean/honest recording of a students voice on a controlled volume level (meaning that it was properly gain staged for the best possible audio fidelity) and low to no reverb, which would be the before, with a badly distorted/digitally clipped sample of the same student singing where you can't even hear what the guy is doing anymore, which then would be the result of the training. Guys, when you hear a distorted AND louder audio, of course it will sound *huge* compared to a clean version of the same, but this is not a consequence of the singer technique being better, it's just poorly captured and louder. In the sample I received an audio engineer was able to restore a bit of the audio and you could hear the student having issues with the phrase and cracking on it, something that was completely hidden by the distortion. The fact that the distortion itself happens is being used as a sign of competence too, something like *it's so loud the recording equipment can't handle it*. This is non-sense. Certainly if you do not set the gear properly when you go loud, it clips, I did this mistake myself on a few of my videos, but it's all it is, a mistake when recording. Except that on this specific case the effect is being deliberately exploited so I would not call it a mistake either. Loud/Clipped recordings does not mean huge voices. Pay attention to what you are being shown!!
  43. 1 point
    Kinda cool that you think so actually :D, thank you!
  44. 1 point
    MDEW

    Review of Twang and Squillo Research

    A couple of questions. Were these examples the "Twang" with the narrowing of the pharynx cutting off the Piriform sinuses or the Tongue root idea? and " Did you find that you could enter the Passaggio easier with less Breath Pressure? The two Middle examples were more consistent with a "Full voice" sound without sounding modified or "Fake".
  45. 1 point
    MDEW

    Review of Twang and Squillo Research

    People think of Pitch as a vocal fold configuration. A combination of Thickness of the vocal folds,How tight they are together, the length of the cords and perhaps how fast the air is flowing through them. As I mentioned before the voice has many different aspects that coincide with different instruments. Wind, reed, string etc. For example: A steam Whistle...Fixed tube and opening. Air pressure changes the pitch. As the steam pressure rises the pitch goes from low to high. How about those who make sounds with jugs of water: you blow across the top of the opening and the size of the chamber determines pitch. Adding and removing water changes the pitch. How hard you blow does not make a difference....just the SIZE of the tube, or space within the jug. A similar thing with Horns. How about a slide trombone? It is not the amount of air pressure but the length of tube that changes the pitch. And then of course you have the string aspect of changing the size of the thing that is vibrating, the vocal folds. The voice uses all of these. In vocal pedagogy normally ONLY the length or thickness of the vocal folds is taken into account, TA and CT involvement and HOW the vibration may be different. The other aspects are not taken into account when PITCH is discussed. I could be wrong but the term "Registers" for the voice came from the Pipe organ. I believe, in the pipe organ, one set of "Registers" consist of a certain number of Pipes of the same diameter but the length is different.This gives one set of pitches. once you get to a certain pitch the next "Register" is made of another set of pipes with the Same diameter to each other but different from the other "Register" with differing lengths for that group of pitches. What I do not know about the pipe organ is if Each "Register" has it own sound source or if the same source is channeled to each register.
  46. 1 point
    MDEW

    Review of Twang and Squillo Research

    Exactly, I know that it is not the best way to "Sing" but having a mechanical description of a configuration will get you in the "Ball park" so to speak. A general area. There are sounds that I have never made before so when someone just says "Make this sound" and go from there...I am lost and have been lost. One is the "SOUND" of covering in the sense of Classical singing. The SOUND is a result of a configuration, not a cause. I have gotten closer because of some of your own videos, but that was because you used "Sounds" that I was familiar with and put them together. Like the Dopey Yawn sound and adding the "Sound" of twang to bring that dopey sound forward. Just experimenting a few minutes ago I could sing between E4 and G4 by just(it seemed to me) narrowing on purpose as described in this video. Did other things happen too? Probably. But I would lock up before without using a lot of effort. The only effort was Constricting(Lightly) above the larynx. Perhaps other things inside the larynx were able to do there thing easier because of the change in the pharynx.
  47. 1 point
    MDEW

    Review of Twang and Squillo Research

    A few more thoughts on the video. The Hyoglossus muscle (That she supposes in the video is the tongue root) attaches to the hyoid bone. From what I understand about muscles, this means that the hyoglossus could only bring the Hyoid and tongue closer together. So, Tongue root is NOT the hyoglossus. This still does not mean that the Fauchtinger idea has nothing to do with squillo or the ability to close the epiglottis. The Tongue root is more likely an intrinsic muscle of the tongue. These musles are attached to each other and their action is what allows the tongue to change its shape so easily. Another thing to take note of. When first mentioning TWANG, she mentions the Palatopharyngeus muscles and the Uvular area of the throat. She also mentions that they are drawn together and too high in the throat for the Scope to see. Then she never mentions it again but shows the narrowed Pharynx and closed piriform sinuses. It would have been a small matter to place a camera at the opening of the mouth to see if the Palatopharyngeus were indeed drawn together in this configuration.
  48. 1 point
    MDEW

    Interest in vocal forum

    I sent this as a private message but I think it belongs in this thread. There are random people who are reading this thread and some like Felipe have come across it through other means. To me this means that there are people interested in this forum. " I am trying to get things rolling again without stepping on any ones' toes or bringing up sore subjects. I am not sure if I am making any progress and I know that I do not have the skills or knowledge to start any threads of substance other than trying to see if any one is still interested in discussing vocal techniques. I would think that even with facebook and youtube people would want to have conversations that are ongoing and not just random comments like you do on youtube."
  49. 1 point
    gno

    Dio sang in his head?

    Killer - I know what you mean. From a guitarist perspective one of my all time favorites is Steve Lukather. While he is technically brilliant, he always improvises live and he always goes for it. So there may be little mistakes here and there but to me the spontaneity and willingness to bare it all trumps any little technical mistakes. I think that is his "blues" roots shining through. While I'm a big fan of Shred Guitar from a technical aspect, sometimes that "safe" robotic superhuman pyrotechnics gets boring. Plus, in concert, a lot of the shredders do not improvise. I'll always like someone with great technique, and if combined with raw emotion, and true improvisation, like Steve does, it is the best of both worlds. I think Dio is great. His technique is so damn good though it is hard for him to falter that way. But like Felipe noted, he does take liberties which I appreciate.
  50. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    Dio sang in his head?

    Killer, well, on the style (which is heavy metal, not jazz) I don't really know many other singers that improvised and modified their songs live like he did... To be honest I don't even like it so much, I'd rather hear the original lines haha. Heaven and hell became another song i am not sure what you wanted more in terms of risks... It doesn't get much more risky than the manner he chose to write his songs.