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  1. 2 points
    jonpall

    Perfect - Ed Sheeran cover

    Hi guys, long time no see . I just recorded a cover of the song Perfect by Ed Sheeran. Thought you might like to hear . If you like it, feel free to put a comment in the video or a like
  2. 2 points
    Bzean123

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Wow, that's so sad. RIP Adolph. Felipe I'd be glad to add my voice to whatever you want to do.
  3. 2 points
    kickingtone

    Can I start learning singing at 30

    ok. I think that the very first and most important thing is to stop finding your voice cringeworthy. Learning to sing is about noticing, hearing and bringing out what is good, expressive and interesting in your voice. You do that by training. Anybody who tells you that "you don't have a singing voice" when you are starting out, most probably lacks imagination. You mustn't become one of those people. I cannot hear anything in your sample to suggest that you "don't have a singing voice". The vast majority of us develop "singing voices" through training. Go for it!
  4. 2 points
    kickingtone

    Bridge area notes

    Here's another consideration. The attitude and shape of your vocal tract is very important, which is why some vowels work better than others in certain situations. Resonance is "sound build-up" due to favourable vocal tract geometry (not extra effort). It is resonance that produces fuller sound without getting shouty. When you sing, you are continually tuning the vocal tract geometry for resonance, according to the pitch and timbre that you want. Where the tuning is less accurate, there may be a tendency to try to compensate by pushing the sound out (getting shouty), or limiting yourself to softer sounds. You can experiment and practise getting a relaxed and fluid vocal attitude, and finding good resonant configurations. Experiment. Play around with different sounds/noises. See where you feel them resonate. Bridge of the nose? Eyes? Tip of the nose? Back of the mouth? etc. etc. Play around, and get relaxed with the configurations. That will start to reduce the effort and shoutiness.
  5. 2 points
    MDEW

    Bridge area notes

    The first thing to do is change the idea of HITTING the notes to singing the notes. You have to lighten up a bit in this area. There are 2 main muscle groups in the Adams apple that control the voice. One set for thickening the cords and one set for stretching. The thickening set is stronger than the stretching set. You have to back off a little so the two sets can work together. There are several ways to help balance things out. Vowel modification...Some vowels work better in this area. Think lower to sing higher.....Like when someone is using a pulley to lift something heavy. You pull down on one end to lift the object on the other side of the pulley. So bend you knees a little and drop into the higher notes. You can think of the notes being farther away instead of higher. Or you can think of the notes as getting smaller and tighter instead of higher.
  6. 2 points
    MDEW

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    What is the difference between formal training and training yourself? Read a few interviews from these guys and you will find out that they either started out at a young age or Learned from other musicians and singers and worked on sounding good. The difference is in wanting to sound better and working at it. From an interview in guitar Player Magazine: Tommy Shaw "GP: Were you copping licks off records and radio? Tommy: Right. It was more fun trying to figure out "I Want To Hold Your Hand" and "I Saw Her Standing There" than to take those lessons. By this time I knew my basic chords. There were some older guitarists on my side of town, and I got to know many of them. I would go and try just monkey-see monkey-do, which was always a lot easier. I was never a very good student until long after I got out of high school. It took me that long to realize the importance of having somebody who knows teach you something. GP: Was it your R&B background that gave you an appreciation for playing behind vocals?Tommy: When I was a little blue-eyed soul brother I learned how to do the scattin' stuff kind of like George Benson does, where you play and sing the same notes. I really got into that. It's a lot more than just cranking out riffs on the guitar because you're singing in unison, or in harmony, with your playing. It used to be a trademark of mine back in the old days." I would say singing in unison with a guitar riff is a pretty good workout wouldn't you? A nice way to train the voice? Jeff Scott Soto from Wikipedia "Having a keyboard in the house growing up, he taught himself by ear how to play his favorite songs on the radio but it wasn't until middle school where (playing trumpet) he learned to read music. Using this new technical knowledge, he began fronting his first band at the age of 12." Playing trumpet you learn breath control. One of the fundamentals of structured lessons. So, He first taught himself....That does not mean he was born with it. That means he worked on it. Dio: Wiki "His family moved to Portsmouth from Cortland as part of his father's service in the U.S. Army during World War II[11] and they resided there for only a short time before returning to Cortland. Padavona listened to a great deal of opera while growing up, and was influenced vocally by American tenor Mario Lanza.[12] His first formal musical training began at age 5, learning to play the trumpet.[12] " "Despite being known for his powerful singing voice, Padavona claimed to have never received any vocal training.[15] He instead attributed his singing ability to the use of breathing techniques he learned while playing trumpet.[16] In an interview from hammer magazine: "Was music in your blood? “There were no musicians in the family whatsoever, but due to Italian culture music was embedded in the town. I grew up listening to a lot of opera, which really affected my singing style.” So you have someone who is learning music and playing trumpet from the age of 5 and listening to Opera. A natural born singer? Not really. Someone who was singing opera from the age of 5 and who learned breath control AND had formal MUSIC training from that time on. A childhood of conditioning to be a singer. Not natural born.
  7. 2 points
    Hi everyone, I've always loved to sing but I've always been shy to show it to the world. I had singing lessons in the past but once I started a university degree I stopped singing and focused on my degree. I am now stable in my job but this passion for singing has never gone away. Could you give me your feedback please? Thank you so much, this means the world to me. I have a youtube video singing a capella: And also some covers on SoundCloud:
  8. 2 points
    Lovely voice, awesome, more!!
  9. 2 points
    (Nice background story.) I'd say that practically all songs are challenging. If you are not challenged, you either don't get the song, or you are not working hard enough. Anyway, to give a credible performance the way you did, and to do it a cappella (nowhere to hide), would definitely challenge a lot of singers. I'm hearing more heady tones, and less of the "darker mezzo" sound. I can hear the darker rich mezzo tones "lurking" in your voice, but you don't really bring them out? Maybe I am biased. All my favourite female singers use that mezzo sound. (You in London? Brexit just took a nasty turn with the permanent status application thing.)
  10. 2 points
    I only listened to the first one; sound OK, its in tune and you lift the notes well enough, your voice type is of similar to Adele I would say, A dark mezzo. Try something a bit more challenging like rolling in the deep or fire in the rain or something
  11. 2 points
    Hi Marvin, Why make a comment that makes sense and then put in a link that has nothing to do with singing? If you are a real person and want to improve your singing. Look into "The four Pillars of Singing" Taught by Robert Lunte. Binny90, I like the song. It has as much potential as any other song. Keep up the good work. If you do want to improve your singing, The main thing is to practice scales to get your voice used to changing pitches and recognize when you are singing off pitch. Sing a little louder with feeling.
  12. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    I got news from @Robert Lunte that our friend and team member Adolph Namlik passed away earlier this month... This is sad news and I feel we should do something in his memory, perhaps a song with everyone adding their voices, or perhaps those who want to record something on their own could send it too. I will be recording a song if anyone wants to help or collab doing something please let me know. Felipe
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

  15. 1 point
    Due to isolation we can't gig so we decided to do some quasi-live recs haha. This is all diy single takes on the song, hope you like it!
  16. 1 point
    Thanks bro! Ah it´s awesome all around, a bit different from the usual Maiden formula (which I also love).
  17. 1 point
    MDEW

    John Prine RIP

    I learned how to play guitar mostly from learning some of Johns songs, Jim Croce and James Taylor. The songs are simple enough to figure out yourself and interesting enough that you can play them over and over again without getting bored. Plus, if you are singing a song that makes people laugh you can get away with not sounding too good. Either John's sense of humor is similar to mine or l gained my sense of humor by listening to him. Lyrics like " I knew a girl that was almost a lady" and "she won't let me live with her, and she makes me live in my head", helps to give you a new way to express things.
  18. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Great idea. I’m in.
  19. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Jens is also in. How you guys feel about making a cover of Dust in the Wind (Kansas)? Each of us record a bit of the song, and then I put it together in a nice way.
  20. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    RIP Adolph Namlik

    Thank you bro, think I will have something by next week.
  21. 1 point
    Is the label going to change how you sound?
  22. 1 point
    You are unhappy about NOTHING. Learn to like your voice. It works best doing what it does, naturally. Don't try to be a shadow of something else.
  23. 1 point
    Stop worrying about what people are calling your voice. It does not matter until you are up for a certain role in an opera or a musical theater production. Until you are formally trained it does not matter anyway. They call Bob Seger a tenor because he sings between D4 and B4 on most of his songs but he has a deep raspy voice like a Baritone and they Call James Taylor a Baritone because he sings most of his songs Below G4 and he has a light and high sounding voice. It just does not matter for most singing what your voice is called. You sounded real good in that song and that is what matters.
  24. 1 point
    if you can relate it to what they know, I bet you get more participation. Beyond pushing the right buttons, how does a trumpet player make a good sound. It has to do with balancing tension and relaxation, the shape of the mouth and good support. Same thing with singing. Why does a Stradivarius violin sound different from a Stentor. The structure is different so it makes a different sound. Same with the structure of the vocal cords. And it can’t be emphasized enough how people are intimidated about singing. You can blame sounding poorly on an instrument because the valve keeps sticking or because you have an entry level instrument. You can’t change your voice. It’s yours and it’s very personal. There’s no instrument to hide behind. Your body is your instrument. I honestly think the instrumentalists are either intimidated or don’t understand the relevance to them. Most instrumentalists I know are scared to sing. And most instrumental music Ed majors believe that they will be teaching middle or high school band so what’s the point in learning vocal pedagogy. If you can get to the level of their understanding about voice, then you’ll know the right questions to ask which will help them feel more comfortable participating.
  25. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

  26. 1 point
    RNBJR

    Bridge area notes

    I am working on my singing and have been taking lessons. My issue - I seem to do okay with head voice when I go above G4. However, when I try to see in the F4, G4 area on certain songs, it comes out “shouty” and harsh. I can hit the notes fine, but I am not getting quality. If it is a softer, quieter song, I don’t have this issue. I have this issue when trying to do fuller sounding notes in this area. I would greatly appreciate any feedback anyone cares to give. I am not a great singer yet and am trying to learn. Thanks!
  27. 1 point
    You sounded fine where you are singing this. The more you sing this the more comfortable you be with it. Confidence is one of those things in singing that the more confident you are the better it will sound.
  28. 1 point
    There were a few glitches but over all you sounded pretty good. Keep singing. Listen to your recording and I am sure you will hear those few glitches. Any time you are working on a song there will be a few things to work out. Go over the areas where you are having trouble staying on pitch and work them out one phrase at a time.
  29. 1 point
    kickingtone

    The Junk Food Effect

    After a couple of days of junk food bingeing, my throat was dry! Some people disagree with this, but I find it a good opportunity to do diagnostics on your voice. I think that as long as you have wise limits, and don't try to do anything extreme or excessive with a dry (or inflamed) throat, you should be fine. (Better still, if, like me, you know exactly why your throat is dry and you know that it is temporary.) So I sang Green Green Grass of Home (my version, lol) and listened to the playback. I am not surprised that the worst part was the beginning and it took time for my voice to settle. Pretty much cracked on the word "road" of "down the road I look" at the beginning. Again, for me,, it tends to be the ee and oh vowels that tend to go if my throat is dry and I am not paying attention. Also, the end was a lot less controlled than I would have liked, yet I didn't feel tired or anything. So, I have to investigate what was going on there. It's just a good way of finding out your weakest spots because they get exaggerated. (I didn't junk binge deliberately for this, I just take the opportunity after realizing how dry my t throat is after I have eaten too much junk). Often, recording sub-par singing is more informative and valuable than layering and mixing "covers" and then admiring yourself.
  30. 1 point
    Robert Lunte

  31. 1 point
    Very nice. Thank you for sharing. Welcome to the forum.
  32. 1 point
    In regards to the harmonic content: On the first example where the 6th harmonic should be amplified this is the spectral distribution: Both 6th and 5th harmonic have a boost, this is very consistent with the idea of *twang*, being close to the 3khz area. On the second example, where he says it´s 5th harmonic: Indeed the 5th harmonic is stronger on the twang region, but it´s on a very similar level to what it was before, it´s likely the darkening reduced twang and separated the clustering. Reducing twang is also consistent with the lowering of the energy level on the second partial in relation to the fundamental when compared to the first example. Then he demonstrates a vowel on the low range, again the profile is very similar to twang, and of course now that the note is lower, the 3khz band is affecting much higher partials: Finally on stage voice, there is a situation closer to the initial sample, only now because of the higher level of closure, the energy content of the harmonics rise in relation to the fundamental: Twang and 3rd partial are the dominant areas, with a slightly lower 2nd partial, and the fundamental bellow all of this. This is the profile you get with *covering*, also fits CVT *curbing*.
  33. 1 point
    You can go with the resonance angle and ignore the physical or go with the physical and ignore the resonance. But in truth they go together. I do not mean that you have to concentrate on either one, I mean that they are linked. A different mouth shape and tongue position not only effects the resonance chamber but also effects the tension and direction of tension on various muscles around and within the vocal tract and Adams Apple(larynx). Changing the angle of the vocal folds from front to back and individually on the surface area that is touching each while vibrating. Not to mention the amount of material vibrating. You cannot amplify, filter or focus a frequency that is not there. Just as he says in this video it is not one aspect at a time but several together. The amount of each that is required is what tends to get these discussions off track but the important part is that these different aspects are independent and can be used or focused at the same time. ex. Lowered larynx and "shape" of an "OO" vowel WITH the higher tongue position of an "Eh" or "i". Instead of being thought of as "Modifying" the vowel It can be viewed as "Shaping" the sound. The "Sound" can still be shaped regardless of the vowel(Although some are more difficult). I was approaching the same thing with my audio clip. I was going from the physical aspect rather than the resonance. What do you suppose happens to the root of the tongue and the eppilarynx when he shifts from a flat low tongue position to a high rounded one?
  34. 1 point
    HiCu

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    Thanks Robert. I guess what I'm trying to say with word natural talent is they find the property vocal configuration early on. Then they just work on dev songs because the mechanics are already in place. I have seen this over and over again with really natural singers I grew up with.
  35. 1 point
    Starting from 1:00-1:11
  36. 1 point
    Hi James, IDK... Wednesday morning quarterbacks? In the past I used to be inclined to add comment or argue with something like this that I feel is lacking in some way, but these days... I just don't care anymore. It's a waste of time... Who is this guy? Is he a teacher with credibility? Can we seem him teach? Can we hear him sing? It just looks like another way to do a reaction video, which in my view is .... I can't find the words to describe without being rude... but, I think... the ultimate form of "free secret tips". People that typically don't want to train and will never train and will never spend 100 hours singing songs and working on parts. I am SO disinterested in this person's opinion on Russell Allen, that I'm not going to watch the video. His opinion means absolutely LESS than nothing to me. Although I appreciate you making the post and sharing James... it is great to have you as a member. I don't want to seem lacking in gratitude for your participation. Only commenting on the value of the video to me personally. I did notice this however... which I think does have value for both of us. My name is James and I'm a possible future student of Rob Lunte. If you have questions about the TVS training program and becoming a vocal athlete on the program, I am available to serve. Let's get you actually training and singing better by doing it, not by talking about others who do.
  37. 1 point
    kickingtone

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    Examples? Videos? Interviews? That would be handy... Part of the problem I have noticed, and it is not only among professionals, is that people often like to hide the hard work, and then "step out into the limelight glistening and glowing with 'talent'...". Maybe it is pragmatic marketing? Maybe they don't want trolls circulating the fact that they are "human". Fans like to believe that their heroes "wrote a number one hit in 3 minutes flat while in a fit of rage and then sang it perfectly in one take..". I think that marketing pressures perpetuate these myths and the idea of that you may be one of the "lucky ones" who "just sing" and chart-topping stuff flows out at once. As one lucky person said, "the more I work my bollox off, the luckier I get".
  38. 1 point
    MDEW

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    I have seen several cases of an artist/musician/'singer confronting the comment "such a natural born talent" and the reply/look on the face says "Natrural? I worked like hell on this "Natural" talent." Learning, improving, training never stops. If you are taking lessons and the training stops when you walk out of the Teacher/coaches studio....then don't blame the teacher.
  39. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    It´s true that there are people that are significantly better or worse at the skill, it´s also true that everyone works for it in some manner, and it´s true that for the extreme cases normal instruction might not be very efficient, either by being bellow the capability of one of these genius level individuals, or because it´s just totally beyond what a person that has extreme difficulty with singing can cope with. The core of the matter is this: If you consider that everyone that gets good worked for it somehow, and that one of the common points on extremely competent performers is that they were singing at high level from a very early age, the inevitable conclusion is that this talent, if you will call it that, can be resumed to learning speed. And what can be done about learning speed? It seems to be: - Keep learning; - Learn as fast as you can. Two things that seems to be extremely important to stick to this plan: - Sing everyday; - Record yourself singing songs and evaluate it by the same standard you evaluate music you consume. First one is straight forward, if you are not singing, you are not learning. End of story. Second one is a tool that is pretty much of free access nowdays, recording, which gives you a very reliable feedback on what you are doing, but the crucial part is to NOT lower your bar with excuses. And then there are learning tools, voice teachers, programs, coachs, communities. On our messenger group you can very easily sing to a bunch of people that are also learning and get feedback and different ideas on the fly for example. All of these can speed up learning, effectively making you more *talented*. TL/DR It´s a race to skill.
  40. 1 point
    HiCu

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    Some of the absolute best singers I have ever heard had no lessons (Russell Allen, Dio, Tommy Shaw, Mickey Thomas, Jeff Soto etc.) I have interviewed several of professional singers and they just had it naturally. I will also add, some of the absolute worse singers I have ever heard had training, sometimes for years and they still sound horrendous. I believe you need to he born with something to work with. If you sound like shit from the start, you probably will never be a good singer. At least that's my take on things.
  41. 1 point
    Stevie T

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    Sure, 2014 was quite a while ago. Yea.. The sound tracks from Into the wild. I enjoy them too.
  42. 1 point
    Stevie T

    Eddie Vedder Technique

    Apologies to revive this years old thread. Came across this very interesting chain. This topic seems still equally relevant. So, felt like adding my $.02 from what I've learnt over years. I agree that Vedder's singing is more about soulful expressiveness at the cost of losing precision. Plus his vocal tone deserves a credit. Yet, I'd think there are techniques that we can extract from his singing. I'd like to add a few : chest voice, mixed voice, vocal compression, and resonance. Then, loosen up a bit to pour in your soul. Chest pulling was a method I also tended to cling onto, in order to hit higher or energetic notes with my barritone voice, years back. Yes that was strenuous and unhealthy. But I came across techniques such as vocal compression and mixed voice. That resolved the problem of chest pulling or strain related to it. Then to consistently control the voice tone, vocal resonance helped a lot. Eg, add resonance from head cavity onto the chest voice, to make it sound brighter and open. Now, to add in emotions, I guess everyone has his or her way to let the heart and soul speak.
  43. 1 point
    Thank you so much for the feedback @sideshow! I will try something more challenging!
  44. 1 point
    I am not discounting the practice. Or lowering the importance of practical aspects on the contrary what I am suggesting is that the elements or aspects that are practical are overlooked sometimes because we use something unrelated to trigger them. If they are not triggered then we use something else as a trigger. The trigger becomes accepted as the cause. And I am far from looking at things scientifically. The same problem occurs with the science. You run down the rabbit hole seeking formants and chasing numbers or how things line up with the spectrograph.....The numbers say you have more energy in this area or that.... But what causes the energy you don't know because you are looking at numbers not listening to the sound. By using it. If it worked as suggested....there you go. It is not so much the Science I am going for but the practical information. An example is the Tongue root thing on the video of Squillo vs Twang. Let's break this down and see why it is practical and important. 1 '"Twang" has been used for quite a while now to build the voice by almost everyone. 2 The "i" Vowel already has an element of "Twang" it is used to FIND "Twang" along with the "Aa" sound. 3 The term "Twang" is used by the contemporary singing community to mean the same as "Squillo"(they are not). The similar element of "Twang" that has the "SOUND" that is noted as important and "Squillo" is the High frequency energy. That Buzz that everyone says to feel in your mask. 4 That high frequency "Sound" the "Buzzing" is the same that CVT calls Metal. It is the same sound as Robert Lunte uses in his Foundation onset exercise as the "Mee" when you Keep the Buzz. 5 The AH vowel does not naturally Have the "High frequency" energy. 6 Tamplin advocates the "BRIGHT Ah" for training. The Bright Ah is the Ah vowel along with the high frequency energy of "l" that creates the "Buzz" that you feel in the mask.7 in classical singing you have "Covering" and you have Chiaroscuro(dark and bright, A balance of Low Frequency and High Frequency).Covering is also using dark tones and adding clarity by adding the High frequency of "Twang". 8 At least one classical Tenor has stated the the problem people have with "Covering" is that they have a hard time keeping cord closure with the supposed "Low larynx" of the darker vowels. This movement helps close the vocal folds. The point is that the high frequency sound is a result of a movement of the root of the tongue. And that this movement Helps with cord closure, not only that but IF you have the sound you know you have cord closure. The sound can be made regardless of the vowels being used. The sound can be added to and taken away from the over all sound of the voice. It does not rely on Larynx position. It does not rely on breath pressure. It adds pressure to the breath because of the closed position of the vocal folds and the tighter space in the throat. Adding more or closing the gap more creates distortion. Because it is a conscious and independent movement it can be adjusted without causing any other ill effects to the sound. This allows the higher frequencies. It is not that singers have not already been using this. It is that they didn't know they were using it and being convinced NOT to use it but instead activated it through other means like "Make the tone brighter" ""add more twang" "Bring the tone forward" ''"Lean the voice" "use more support". This one is interesting, when you "use more support" and "Lean the voice" you create more breath pressure that you are then told to resist. The tongue root is used to help resist the pressure of the breath. Setting up a condition where the tongue root is brought into the coordination without the conscious knowledge of the singer. You could have purposely used the tongue root and done away with all that pressure. The Knoedle is another coordination that has this tongue root movement but it also raises the larynx causing its own problems. The knoedle seems to be something that many people recognize and can produce rather easily so they end up using this, not knowing how to isolate the cause of the Bright sound from the raised larynx position and the somehow deeper sound caused by it. I have not had a chance or circumstance to create a new audio file to demonstrate what I have been writing about. But I have a file I created 3 or so years ago about a similar thing about using a different voice. In it I use the knoedle, at that time I did not know about the Tongue Root but I do make the sound of the '""pharynx narrowing'" which may or may not be the same as Epilarynx narrowing as opposed to the "tongue root" which gives the Buzz to the voice. I had believed that I was using the false folds but it may not be what I am doing. I am not saying this sounds great. I am saying that it demonstrates the difference between The Tongue root sound and the Pharynx/epilarynx narrowing sound. I try to joke about things, and be light hearted and friendly. That is why I mispronounced the Thyroarytenoids. It was for those people who hate sciency terms.
  45. 1 point
    Rotlung

    Dio sang in his head?

    If those notes at the end were M1, they'd probably sound a lot shoutier and a lot harder to enunciate with ease, I think. Dio could layer a distortion on well, anything. He could even distort a piano if he put his voice to it.
  46. 1 point
    gno

    Dio sang in his head?

    Killer - I know what you mean. From a guitarist perspective one of my all time favorites is Steve Lukather. While he is technically brilliant, he always improvises live and he always goes for it. So there may be little mistakes here and there but to me the spontaneity and willingness to bare it all trumps any little technical mistakes. I think that is his "blues" roots shining through. While I'm a big fan of Shred Guitar from a technical aspect, sometimes that "safe" robotic superhuman pyrotechnics gets boring. Plus, in concert, a lot of the shredders do not improvise. I'll always like someone with great technique, and if combined with raw emotion, and true improvisation, like Steve does, it is the best of both worlds. I think Dio is great. His technique is so damn good though it is hard for him to falter that way. But like Felipe noted, he does take liberties which I appreciate.
  47. 1 point
    JackCee

    Dio sang in his head?

    Scroll down to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronnie_James_Dio "Early Years, Education, & Musical Education" the interview can be referenced here also http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/community/chat/2002-06-17-dio.htm quote, unquote: Brownsville, TX: Ronnie, Do you have any operatic influences? Any favorite operas or classical pieces? Ronnie James Dio: Growing up I listened to a lot of opera, and was influenced by Mario Lanza. I couldn't believe his incredible voice. I wanted to use that aspect of vocalization in the rock and roll context. I guess that's the connection people see between my operatic style and music as heavy as possible. A lot of people knock opera and will not ever appreciate it's contribution to modern vocal techniques. Dio took what he liked from opera and turned it into something beautiful. That might not work for everyone but sure as hell work for Dio.
  48. 1 point
    Felipe Carvalho

    Dio sang in his head?

    Killer, well, on the style (which is heavy metal, not jazz) I don't really know many other singers that improvised and modified their songs live like he did... To be honest I don't even like it so much, I'd rather hear the original lines haha. Heaven and hell became another song i am not sure what you wanted more in terms of risks... It doesn't get much more risky than the manner he chose to write his songs.
  49. 1 point
    KillerKu

    Dio sang in his head?

    I've never really had an ear of his interpretive capabilities, but it might be my tastes. I've never heard Dio sound unhinged, improvisational, unpredictable, or like he was riding a song by the seat of his pants. He was a master of his voice, but regardless of his clean or distorted singing, he usually sounds controlled and meticulous to me. Does anyone have any clips of him singing jazz or something that requires on the spot interpretation? I like chaos in music. Maybe he's just too good of a singer, so I don't the that on the edge of my seat, everything could fall apart at any moment, but you know he pulls through feeling to his performances. Like everything he did he had a formula down pact. If someone wants a comparison, it's like let's say you're watching a sports game and the score is 80 to 20 ratio the whole game. I get more excitement when it's closer to failure. In some of the artists I consider musical geniuses like Stevie Wonder, or Frank, I've heard them fall apart. That risk, keeps me on my seat of my pants in their performances. They never sing the same song the same way twice, and are always improvising and pushing for more and more. Dio is kind of like Michael Jordan vs a toddler. There feels like so little chaos. I like effort in performers. Anybody got any clips of him slugging it out with a song and taking huge risks? I'd like to be able to get into him more than I currently am, as he is a cool guy and a good singer. I kind of wish he struggled more, is all. Conflict, effort, and risking failure really excites me in art. I wish I could hear more of what you guys are hearing. I'd need to hear more of his vulnerabilities, risks, and potential failures to identify with him more as a vocal artist, I think. I don't know if it's just the way I hear music, but the voice is the most human element in all of music, I need some semblance of a human being struggling to express something to be engaged for long. If things are too easy for the vocal artist, I don't know how to relate to that expression as much as if things are difficult.
  50. 1 point
    I think personally the best way you learn this is through discovery. If you find an extremly grounded note correctly, you'll feel your body is extremly active. You repeat this sound a few times and start wondering what your body is doing. The support is always linked to the vocal production. It might be hard for you to just copy what others do, but once you experience it in your body after creating the right sounds, you'll be able to reproduce it.