TMV World Team

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    Robert Thayer Sataloff, MD, DMA, FACS is the Executive director of The Voice Foundation. The World's leading association for research regarding the human voice. He is also professor and chair, at the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and senior associate dean for clinical academic specialties, Drexel University College of Medicine. He is also adjunct professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University, the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University, and is on the faculty of the Academy of Vocal Arts. He served as conductor of the Thomas Jefferson University Choir for nearly four decades. Dr. Robert Sataloff www.VoiceFoundation.org

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  2. TMV World Team

    RODE Microphone - i-XY Review

    RODE Microphones brings the big guns to iOS with the iXY RODE i-XY Podcast However good they claim to be I've always been a bit leary of using iOS devices along with the loads of 3rd party plug-in devices for anything remotely related to audio. Most surmount to little more than toys with sketchy build quality and laughable user interfaces that inevitably result in more irritation and poor quality sound than the price of admission. Australia-based Rode Microphones hopes to change that perception with the introduction of their iXY Stereo Microphone. Immediately out of the box its clear that Rode has brought the proverbial gun to a knife fight. The i-XY is unquestionably one of the most professional looking iThings to plug into the 30 pin dock of an iOS device. Side note - sorry iPhone 5 adopters there isn't an i-XY for you - yet. The Rode i-XY features twin stereo capsules in a clever X/Y stereo configuration and is housed in a rather attractive silver alloy casing. Machined allen-head screws complete with Rode's trademark gold pickup area dot and a b uilt-in power on indicator light fill out the look. Construction is in fact so robust that in hand it feels almost as if Rode constructed the iXY out of a solid block of aluminum. The 30 pin connector fits rather tightly into the base of your iOS device leaving little concern for getting dislodged. Along with the iX Y unit comes twin foam wind screens as well as a compact hard zipped carrying case. Rode also provides a recording app - RØDE Rec - for download in the iTunes store. More on that below. Order RODE i-XY Recording Microphone for iPhone and iPad from The Vocal Gear Store I tested the i-XY with a variety of sound sources from spoken voice to acoustic guitar as well as a rather l oud metal concert. The i-XY seemed to handle all with relative ease and had more than enough headroom to preserve the original recording without clipping or phasing issues. The noise floor was reasonably low for a field recording microphone with minimal background noise when recording in quieter settings such as acoustic guitar. However, as expected, the Rode did prefer to be as close to the source as possible especially when dealing with soft-spoken tracks. Overall the iXY gives any high-quality field recording array some solid competition from the standpoint of preserving the original source. While the Rode i-XY is an impressive piece of hardware on its own the available Rode Rec iOS app is what makes the i-XY shine. Starting with the ability to track in 24-bit 96 kHz resolution the Rode Rec app also features built-in editing much like a DAW as well as the ability to add various effects such as compression, EQ and some additional processing courtesy of Izotope. While recording you also have the option of live monitoring through the iPhone/iPads build in 1/8" mini jack. The main recording transport screen features quick rather accurate metering that's a nice bonus and when the device is flipped sideways the transport gives way to simple yet intui tive editing screen which allows for simple to more complex fades and trimming. Once you complete your recording tapping the 'Share' tab reveals a rather complete set of file sharing including SoundCloud, Dropbox and the usual email and iTunes options. Talking about iPhones and iPads, take a look on this wonderful iPad accessory - Hercules DG305B iPad Holder, order online from The Vocal Gear Store When it comes high-quality field recording for iOS devices Rode brings their A-Game with the iXY. They've managed to package high-quality hardware with a clever and complete recording application that in our opinion negates the need to carry around a separate field recording device. The Rode iXY is available now for $199.00 on the street. The Rode Rec (not included) is available for $5.99 in the iTunes store. ~TN i -XY Specifications Acoustic PrinciplePressure GradientCapsule0.50"Polar PatternAddress TypeEndFrequency Range20Hz - 20kHzMaximum SPL120dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)Sensitivity-42.0dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (8.52mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHzEquivalent Noise Level (A-weighted)18dB-APower Options(Powered by iOS device)Weight40.00gm 46.00mmH x 55.00mmW x 40.00mmD http://www.rode.com/microphones/ixy Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  3. TMV World Team

    RODE Microphone - i-XY Review

    RODE Microphones brings the big guns to iOS with the iXY RODE i-XY Podcast However good they claim to be I've always been a bit leary of using iOS devices along with the loads of 3rd party plug-in devices for anything remotely related to audio. Most surmount to little more than toys with sketchy build quality and laughable user interfaces that inevitably result in more irritation and poor quality sound than the price of admission. Australia-based Rode Microphones hopes to change that perception with the introduction of their iXY Stereo Microphone. Immediately out of the box its clear that Rode has brought the proverbial gun to a knife fight. The i-XY is unquestionably one of the most professional looking iThings to plug into the 30 pin dock of an iOS device. Side note - sorry iPhone 5 adopters there isn't an i-XY for you - yet. The Rode i-XY features twin stereo capsules in a clever X/Y stereo configuration and is housed in a rather attractive silver alloy casing. Machined allen-head screws complete with Rode's trademark gold pickup area dot and a b uilt-in power on indicator light fill out the look. Construction is in fact so robust that in hand it feels almost as if Rode constructed the iXY out of a solid block of aluminum. The 30 pin connector fits rather tightly into the base of your iOS device leaving little concern for getting dislodged. Along with the iX Y unit comes twin foam wind screens as well as a compact hard zipped carrying case. Rode also provides a recording app - RØDE Rec - for download in the iTunes store. More on that below. Order RODE i-XY Recording Microphone for iPhone and iPad from The Vocal Gear Store I tested the i-XY with a variety of sound sources from spoken voice to acoustic guitar as well as a rather l oud metal concert. The i-XY seemed to handle all with relative ease and had more than enough headroom to preserve the original recording without clipping or phasing issues. The noise floor was reasonably low for a field recording microphone with minimal background noise when recording in quieter settings such as acoustic guitar. However, as expected, the Rode did prefer to be as close to the source as possible especially when dealing with soft-spoken tracks. Overall the iXY gives any high-quality field recording array some solid competition from the standpoint of preserving the original source. While the Rode i-XY is an impressive piece of hardware on its own the available Rode Rec iOS app is what makes the i-XY shine. Starting with the ability to track in 24-bit 96 kHz resolution the Rode Rec app also features built-in editing much like a DAW as well as the ability to add various effects such as compression, EQ and some additional processing courtesy of Izotope. While recording you also have the option of live monitoring through the iPhone/iPads build in 1/8" mini jack. The main recording transport screen features quick rather accurate metering that's a nice bonus and when the device is flipped sideways the transport gives way to simple yet intui tive editing screen which allows for simple to more complex fades and trimming. Once you complete your recording tapping the 'Share' tab reveals a rather complete set of file sharing including SoundCloud, Dropbox and the usual email and iTunes options. Talking about iPhones and iPads, take a look on this wonderful iPad accessory - Hercules DG305B iPad Holder, order online from The Vocal Gear Store When it comes high-quality field recording for iOS devices Rode brings their A-Game with the iXY. They've managed to package high-quality hardware with a clever and complete recording application that in our opinion negates the need to carry around a separate field recording device. The Rode iXY is available now for $199.00 on the street. The Rode Rec (not included) is available for $5.99 in the iTunes store. ~TN i -XY Specifications Acoustic PrinciplePressure GradientCapsule0.50"Polar PatternAddress TypeEndFrequency Range20Hz - 20kHzMaximum SPL120dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)Sensitivity-42.0dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (8.52mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHzEquivalent Noise Level (A-weighted)18dB-APower Options(Powered by iOS device)Weight40.00gm 46.00mmH x 55.00mmW x 40.00mmD http://www.rode.com/microphones/ixy Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International. View full articles
  4. TMV World Team

    Placid Audio Copperphone Mini Review

    Throw out your vintage effects, this mic does it better. You can find Placid Audio products on Vocal Gear Store. Most of the time in either a live or studio situati on when I'm looking to give a vocal track a bit more of a distinctive sound I instinctively either reach for some flavor of an effects processor or my favorite plugin. Why? Because generally unless one enjoys combing through Craigslist and eBay listings for that perfectly elusive esoteric microphone, modern effects processors with hundreds if not thousands of available models to choose from often sound quite good in addition to offering nearly infinite control over our sound. Convenience, however comes at a price and there is one effect situation in my experience where the cold unfeeling electronics continually seem come up a bit short of something authentic sounding: the vintage "telephone" effect. Sometimes there's no replacement for the real thing and thanks to Mark Pirro of Placid Audio we have something called the Copperphone Mini that may just fill that niche. INTRODUCING THE COPPERPHONE MINI Placid Audio was initially spurred by a need of the singer of Pirro's band - The Polyphonic Spree - to find the perfect vintage sounding microphone. Instead of trying to actually find something authentically old Mark - whom is also a sound engineer - decided to have a crack at creating his own. After creating a few prototypes, word started to spread around the musician community and in 2003 Pirro started producing small quantities in his garage outside of Dallas, Texas to fill the need. As popularity grew he created two additional models, one of which is the Copperphone Mini . One of the most distinctive features about the Copperphone series is Placid Audio builds them out of rather robust looking polished copper housings. The Copperphone mini is no exception and is rather attractive to look at especially when installed it is removable aluminum shock mount housing. Construction and fit and finish is high grade and I would say the overall look belies its $299.00 MSRP. Oddly enough the Copperphone Mini was originally designed with Harmonica players in mind but after artists started using it on vocals, guitars, upright basses and the like it became apparent that the point of the Mini isn't the application but rather the creativity it can introduce into the sound. The Copperphone Mini uses a fairly forgiving dynamic as well as a cardioid pickup pattern to make it fairly versatile both live and in studio. Contrary to the look the Mini does not use any vintage internal components but rather high-grade modern electronics with an impressively low noise floor. It should be noted that any mic or effects box operating in a limited frequency bandwidth can increase the potential for feedback depending on how much gain you are trying to pump through it. However, in practice I didn't find the Mini to be any better or worse compared to other similar devices when pushed beyond realistic limitations. THE SOUND OF NOSTALGIA So then how does the Copperphone Mini sound? Impressive. On vocals, the Mini finds an excellent balance between that vintage lo-fi effect and leaving a wide enough of a frequency band so the vocals still have some weight to cut through the mix. The Mini when compared to some telephone effects I had in my signal chain really shined with its warm analog goodness. I found the Mini to inspire more creativity than just a stock telephone effect as I felt generally it had a much more authentic sound and that could even be varied by careful use of proximity effect. WRAP UP With its tank-like boutique build quality, killer vintage sound and lifetime warranty the Copperphone Mini is decidedly one to consider adding to the arsenal. It's not so much IF you'll find a use for it but rather WHEN and I'm willing to bet the first time you do you'll quickly find more and more uses. We at TMV are certainly having some fun with ours. ~TN Copperphone Mini Specs: - Type: Dynamic - Polar Pattern: Cardioid - Frequency Response: 200Hz , 1.4kHz - Impedance: 150 ohms - Output: 105 +/- 2dB SPL @ 1 kHz - Microphone Dimensions: 1.75 inch x 2.25 inch - Shock Mount Dimensions: 6 inch diameter x 0.75 inch - Weight: 0.75 lbs FEATURES - High-grade passive variable reluctance transducer - High-quality Switchcraft 3 pin XLR connector - Rugged copper housing and components - Dismounting kit for optional ergonomic handheld use - Handcrafted in the U.S.A - Lifetime operational warranty - Aircraft aluminum shock mount ring to fit North American style stands http://www.placidaudio.com/products/copperphone-mini/ Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  5. VOCAL TRAINING INDUSTRY WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW! Click The Top Left Menu To View Videos In The Video Playlist
  6. Singingsuccess.com paid Google for advertising that rips off The Vocalist Studio's customers and product, by paying for a high ranking advertisement of "The Pillars of Singing" (no "four") , ... a forged name of the real product, and then redirected TVS web traffic to their web site. Pretty greedy & cowardly guys... Do you actually lack that much confidence in your own product and brand, that you feel the need to trick customers, by creating a forgery, for the purpose of stealing web traffic from your competitors? Apparently so...
  7. TMV World Team

    KTVA VS. TVS : Early VS Late Bridging

    HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  8. TMV World Team

    Grooming Your Voice For Success

    Grooming Your Voice For Success By Julie Lyonn Lieberman It's easy to build vocal habits when you sing a song over and over again. These habits can be useful to free us to focus on performance values; but all too often, we lock in tightness and inferior function, thereby creating a struggle during performance or even hoarseness, a sore throat, and the like. No matter how good you sound, how music business savvy you are, and how hard you've worked on your material and its presentation, if you don't cultivate a ritual around how you care for your voice, you stand to compromise your future and potentially your level of success. Pro-athletes work with their muscles intelligently. They understand that if they don't warm up, respect the properties of muscle and joint function, and warm down, they may be beleaguered with aches and pains or injuries that thwart the level of success they are able to achieve. Taking responsibility represents potential longevity as well as quality of experience. Most singers already know that warm-ups are important, but they may not understand why it's essential to vocalize regularly before singing their actual material. Let's use our postural muscles as a metaphor. Let's say you spend 10 hours a day hunched over. The muscles will gradually adapt and freeze you into that posture if you don't stretch and strengthen your body to counterbalance repetitive motion. Your sound is influenced by a combination of genetics; family and geographic influences on pronunciation/articulation; and the influence of your emotional/psychological gestalt on the use of your vocal anatomy. All of these factors culminate to create habitual muscular response. This, in turn, can embed and strengthen patterns that mobilize the tongue, lips, breath, and what I call the cathedral the interior musculature of the mouth and throat. Vocal exercises aerobicize, stretch and strengthen these muscle groups so that they remain balanced. Through this process, you can refine and detail mind-to-body response so that each sound you hear, each emotion you experience, and every thought you intend to communicate to your audience is received by this flexible work station and translated into a palette of color and texture. Here is the ironic twist: we are least conscious of how we sing each time we learn a new song because our attention is focused almost entirely on learning the melody and words. Yet, this is when we tend to sing the song the most in order to learn it. If it's an original piece, this is also when we are also the most emotional because the lyrics are intimately connected to and motivated by current life experiences. Some singers, when they are imbued with feeling, tighten the throat or body to express emotion as it wells up. Muscularly speaking, the brain can't differentiate between the activity, singing that specific song, and how we are carrying out the activity. The brain takes all of that information, and locks it together into a sensory engram (which I like to call a barcode.) From that moment forward, we tend to perform the song exactly as we rehearsed it. Here are some simple procedures you can institute to improve your practice habits: 1) Warm up before singing lyrics: Assess your voice each day and choose exercises that stimulate desired response from breath support, lip action, tongue behavior, and the tone you produce. This is detailed on my DVD, Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today Singer (see JulieLyonn.com > Vocalist's Corner for details). 2) When learning a new song, sing the melody on the vowel that's most comfortable for you first; then use the actual vowels of the words but without the consonants. 3) To prevent any habitual muscular associations, speak the lyrics to learn them, but use varying accents from around the world or country; become an actor or actress and delivery the lyrics using different personalities, pitch settings, and emotional contexts to avoid inadvertently embedding negative muscular habits. Examples: become a British school teacher become a sea nymph speak wistfully, then angrily, then lovingly use your low range and then your high range vary volume as you speak vary pitch as you speak 4) Join the lyrics and melody together, singing softly without emotion; then try singing the song in various keys as well as with variations in volume. You can apply the personalities you've rehearsed to the sung version as well. 5) Now sing emotionally. Notice what happens to you physically when you become more expressive. If you discover tension mounting in areas of your body, try varying how you express emotion by using imagery: I will pour my anger out the bottom of my feet like a pitcher with a leak. I will inhale and exhale on between each sentence as if I'm filling the sails of a sailboat with my breath and emulate that image when I sing each sentence of the song. I will sing the song with the opposite emotion the lyrics require (emotion is energy and when we pour anger into a love song, it doesn't necessarily read as anger it can read as heightened passion!) There is a popular quote, sometimes attributed to Albert Einstein, and other times to Benjamin Franklin or Rita Mae Brown, that goes something like, Insanity is doing the same thing the same way over and over again and expecting different results. The above practice procedures will give you an opportunity to step out of old practice habits and thereby gain new results. Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman 60-minute instructional DVD distributed by Hal Leonard World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. Her in-depth studies while creating her critically acclaimed book You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed a do as I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher’s directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy,National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores. To Order: This DVD is distributed by Hal Leonard through your local music, book store, and amazon.com for $23.95 or SPECIAL PRICE FOR MEMBERS OF THE MODERN VOCALIST Purchase through Paypal at The Vocalist's Corner on julielyonn.com or Send a check to Julie Lyonn Music, P.O. Box 268, Worthington, MA 01098 $21.95 + $5.00 shipping in the U.S.Add $5 outside the U.S.
  9. TMV World Team

    Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers

    Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman Running Time and Format: 60-minute instructional DVD Distributed by: Hal Leonard Corporation (7777 W. Bluemound Rd. Milwaukee, WI 53213, 800-637-2852, http://www.halleonard.com /) to bookstores, music stores and schools through the world) Release Date: September 30, 2008 Description: World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. In-depth studies while writing her critically acclaimed book. You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher's directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! To Order: see JulieLyonn.com and click on Vocalist's Corner About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman (JulieLyonn.com) has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy, National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores.
  10. Hi, Everybody.....It's nice to see this new forum even in its early stages having such response as well as the enthusiasm that's being generated. Already I am seeing posts on Breath Support. Listen up everybody. If you are not all over your kids(students) like I am about Breath Support, it's only going to lead to their downfalls and short-comings in many aspects. In the past 6 months, I have seen people lose gigs, blow auditions and turn out really sub-par recordings because of lack of breath support. Mainly, bad intonation that was caused by lack of Breath Support was largely the problem. Now I'm not going to sit here and write a long article on my philosophies because I know that ALL of you have your own way of teaching and monitoring your kids' breath support. I'll be sending numerous articles on this topic soon on this site and other forums that I contribute to. Ironically Breath Support can be abbreviated to BS. But this a not a BULL*#@T story!!! So let's cut the BS and make sure the word gets out on Breath Support. Breath Support is No BS!!! I can't even begin to tell you how many times a day that I have to yell "SUPPORT!!!!" over the loud music in my voice studio while my kids are singing over their tracks because people don't keep Breath Support consistent from the beginning of each phrase to the END of each phrase. The end of the phrase is when Breath Support is the most crucial for airstream as well as keeping the Voice relaxed. So now I'm going to tell my kids this "If you want to be a BS singer or BS performer then don't cut the Breath Support." That's total BS. But then again, look at the person who authored this Blog who more than likely has been called a B*#@SH---TER his entire life.(Even when he was a liitle sh-thead).
  11. TMV World Team

    You WERE Born with "It"

    I was just saying to a student yesterday (I'm a voice teacher)... I have this friend who is in awe of all these great writers, and is fond of saying things like, "I'll never write like Herman Hesse, or Sylvia Plath. They were so great." And I say, "Yes, they are in your eyes now. But when they were sitting down, writing, they weren't trying to be 'great', or trying to be a 'genius'. They were simply doing what they were driven to do. And I'll bet you they thought what they were doing was crap, and they struggled with doubts just as much as we do." History is full of a legion of writers and artists, etc., who were unappreciated in the time they lived, but were revered afterwards. In our own lifetime, we have amazing writers whose novels were turned down countless times before finally being published and then topping the bestsellers list. I'm a firm disbeliever in the old adage that you 'have to be born with it.' My challenge to anyone who says that is... how do you know if you are born with it, if you don't do the work to find out? And you do that work because it lights you up inside to do that thing. Your passion becomes your motivation to work, and to practice, and to become. Not so you can be seen by the external world to be 'great' or a 'genius', but because you can't imagine your life without that thing you do that makes you feel alive. And you want to get good at it, and through that process of growth & healing you become more than you ever thought possible for you. As you walk your path, struggling with your own doubts and trying to learn what you need to know... you become compassionate about the people who are around you, in front of you, behind you, on the same path... because you realize there is no difference between you and them. Yet each of us is special and unique, and has the potential to achieve almost anything we dream of doing. As we are mentored by our more experienced friends, we pass along our knowledge to those less experienced, and it becomes a chain of support & understanding from our extended family of creative souls. No one is an island. As long as we are born & remain relatively healthy, and have the capacity to listen and learn, then anything is possible. If we are willing to do the work. I see this in my own studio all the time. I work with singers who cannot sing. They are 'tonedeaf'. They cannot sing on key. Even if you offered them a million bucks, they couldn't do it. You'd say, very adamantly, they are not born with it at all, that they should give up and go do something else. Come back a year or two later. And you'd say... 'this can't be the same person.' You'd be amazed at the stunning voice coming from that supposedly tonedeaf person who couldn't sing on key to save their life. As long as you are born with the capacity to learn and perservere, have compassion for yourself & others, and grow your conscious awareness so you can balance strength with humility, you have "it".
  12. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.
  13. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  14. Ever wanted to add some sparkle to your mic cable? Item: Neutrik crystalCON, Decorative Mic Cable Connectors Price: $18 (US), £15 (UK) (per connector) Mic Rating: 4/5 At A Glance: Neutrik’s crystalCON range consist of XLR (mic) connectors that are decorated with Swarovski crystals to add some sparkle to your mic cable. They have a tough black metal housing and gold plated contacts to ensure you get a great quality connection to your microphone that will withstand years of use. The connectors also support Neutrik’s colored coding rings that allow you to add a further degree of customisation so that your mic lead doesn’t get mixed up with your band mates if you all have similar looking cables. High Notes: The are available in both male (NC3MXX-B-CRYSTAL) and female (NC3FXX-B-CRYSTAL) XLR connection formats – so you could just solder one to the end of your mic cable that is on display if you wanted to and not have to buy both connectors. The CRYSTALLIZEDTM, Swarovski Elements stand out nicely against the Black chromium chassis and the color ring can be changed without unsoldering insert. Off Pitch: Adding crystals to your mic cable won’t be to everyone’s tastes. Also, there are very few ready-made cables available that use the connectors – so you may need to solder your own. VoiceCouncil Reviewer Says: Love them or hate them, Neutrik’s crystalCON connectors offer something a bit different from your usual mic cable connectors. They are built to an excellent quality and if your stage look involves a lot of sparkles, then these could be the perfect to addition to your setup. It is a shame that there are very few ready-made cables available that feature these connections, as I’m sure many singers are not that confident using a soldering iron (however, it’s not as difficult as you might think and can be a useful skill to learn). If you also play guitar or keyboards while you sing, Neutrik also produce a ¼ jack lead version of the connector if you want it to match your mic lead. Manufacturer’s Website: Neutrik Other Reviews: We could not find any other reviews at the time of publishing.
  15. TMV World Team

    Buying a PA – Do WATTS Matter?

    David Hilderman reveals what matters most when you’re choosing PA speakers for a small or medium sized venue. There’s a lot of advertizing hype about speakers – especially in relation to “watts” – but what are the specs that really matter? David Hilderman, Chief Operating Officer at TC-Helicon, explains what may work best for singers & musicians in small and mid-sized venues. David Hilderman is the Chief Operating Officer of TC-Helicon Vocal Technologies in Victoria, BC Canada where he lives with his wife and two teenage children. He is engaged in hardware design, strategic planning and product development.Visit TC-Helicon
  16. TMV World Team

    One Direction - Perfect (Cover)

    Sharifa, please pay for the premium forum service to have your singing reviewed. Thank you.
  17. TMV World Team

    Harmony Voice

    Read more > (over on our sister site: MusicMakerApps.com)
  18. TMV World Team

    Vocal Gear Recommendations For Singers

    What is a vocalist's gig bag? Generally speaking, a vocalist's gig bag is a bag in which you will keep all of your tools as a serious vocalist so that you will always have everything you need for the gig, practice or your voice lessons. I have been training contemporary vocalists for over 10 years and performing live and recording since I was a teenager. The following recommendations are field tested. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. Recommended Vocal Gear Microphones RODE M1 (dynamic) RODE M2 (condenser)Electro -Voice N/D 767a Electro-Voice N/D 967a Electro-Voice PL80aSENNHEISER e935 AKG D7 Lampifier 111TC-Helicon MP-75 Neumann 104 The Samson Airline 77 (Wireless Microphone Solution) Vocal Effect Pedals TC-Helicon Mic Mechanic TC-Helicon VoiceTone Create XT TC-Helicon Doubler (simulates studio doubling) TC-Helicon Correct (compression)TC-Helicon VoiceTone Singles D1 Digital Audio Work Stations (DAW) & Plug-ins LogicPro X (The DAW from Apple. Can be found on a Mac Book) Nector 2 Suite (DAW Vocal Plug-in)Waves (DAW Vocal Plug-ins) Vocal Rider Vitamin Doubler Olympus LS-12 Live Recorder (for quick plug-in play demos) Microphone Pre-Amps Universal Audio Twin-Finity 710 (Professional Level) Focusrite ISA One (Professional Level) Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 (Home Recording Solution) Focusrite Scarlett 18i8 (Home Recording Solution) Headphones Extreme Isolation Headphones X-29s Other Vocal Gear Master Writer Sofware Singer's Tea & The Vocal Inhaler Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS SeriesHercules Microphone Stands Pocket Tone or purchase the PocketTones app. on iPhone. Vocal booth to go or Sterling Reflection Filter Spectrum Software Recommendations PC: " Voce Vista" Click HERE >>> Apple (iPhone & iPad only): "Spectrum Analyzer" by ONYX Settings: FFT Size - 8192 / Window - Rect / Average - Fast / Graph - Mixed / Scale Log CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE RECOMMENDED VOCAL GEAR * This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  19. INTRODUCTING: The Electro-Voice N/D767a Dynamic Mic A vocal microphone is a very personal item. It's the key element you have for showcasing your work and talent. It can also be the difference between an outstanding performance or blowing your voice out halfway through the set. Admittedly a competent sound engineer can do a fair amount to remedy vocal issues in a live environment but the best way to to ensure a great sound is actually in your control at the head of the signal chain - YOUR mic. When I first heard about the EV N/D767a I'll admit that a vocal microphone costing $100 and marketing itself as a "premium" mic triggered my skepticism considering some of the notable competition including the industry standard Shure Beta58a and Audix OM5 (both dynamic mics) are nearly $60 more. Did I mention the EV came out nearly 10 years ago? So how good could this mic really be? Electro-Voice N/D767a Dynam ic Mic: Design And Useability In the box the Electro-Voice 767a comes with the usual compliment of padded zipper bag, clip and spec sheet. Nothing out of the ordinary here. It comes dressed for the party all-businesslike in the standard EV black with gold bumper strip around the windscreen - not exactly sexy but fit and finish is excellent. EV uses a rubber sleeve on the body of the mic that they like to call WarmGrip that not only feels better and grippier compared to more standard painted metal bodies but likely contributes to reduced handling noise. And yes for those of you with perpetually cold hands it does in fact feel warmer than a metal body. One thing that EV has done with this microphone that I appreciate is how nicely balanced it feels in-hand with the fatter than most grip on the body. Some mics have a tendency to feel a bit top-heavy at the windscreen which over the course of a set or rehearsal can start to feel fatiguing. Electro-Voice N/D767a Dynamic Mic: Specifications The EV N/D767a is classified as a supercardioid dynamic which in lamens terms means it should be excellent at rejecting input anywhere but directly in front of the mic as well as being able to be subjected to very high gain levels before feedback-something of critical importance in a live situation. While specs don't tell the entire story it's notable to point out the 767 touts a close-up frequency range of 35hz-22,000hz which, on paper, looks rather impressive compared to some of the other offerings out there. I should note however that its hard to say whether that additional frequency response is actually usable considering a pretty steep roll-off after a +12-13db bump around 12khz. I suspect some of this to be what amounts to clever marketing in the specs department. Finally unscrewing the top half of the windscreen reveals what is a HUGE diaphragm and likely what helps give the EV its big meat and potatoes sound. Electro-Voice N/D767a Dynamic Mic: Sound Characteristics I would consider my voice to fall into the tenor category with a significant amount of ring [read: overtones] but not really much to spare in the low end category. The biggest issue I run across with other vocal mics is lack of low-end cut. At best this results in a thin sound that ends up getting lost in the mix and at worst it borders on shrill. By the time I've managed to get the gain to an acceptable level to hear myself we're already deep into the feed back zone. This is where the EV really shines. Using what they refer to as VOB i.e. Vocal Optimized Bass which is likely a combination of the aforementioned big diaphragm plus some clever electronics the EV provides an excellent amount of low end grunt. I find this to be especially useful in more sensitive passages where I'm using lower parts of my range while singing right up on the windscreen. This is typically where in a live situation my vocals would dissapear for lack of gain before feedback with other vocal mics. For those of us who like to use the proximity effect to get the most out of a scream here or there in our work the EV accomodates this nicely as well. I found the 767 to be excellent at rejecting feedback when half-covering the windscreen during a screaming passage. Occasionally I have found the 767 to borderline on bein g a bit boomy in the mids depending on the PA and vocal effects but this can usually be corrected via EQ. Another excellent trait of this mic is clarity. I went through a phase of about a year where I was sick of dealing with cables so I had put away my 767 and was instead using my wireless Shure Beta87A condenser. As luck would have it at a recent rehearsal my battery ran down and I didn't have a replacement so I pulled out the EV. We ran through a song with the EV and immediately afterwards my bandmates commented on how much better they could hear every word I was singing. As we finished out the set I was reminded to just how sensitive this mic is at capturing the little vocal nuances that tend to otherwise get lost in the mix. I was actually able to adjust the gain on the PA down slightly and still have the vocals sit comfortably in the live mix. WRAP-UP The Electro-Voice N/D767 is an all-around good if not excellent live performer. It's smooth character, excellent dynamics and and high gain before feedback make it a winner in my book and at $100 you would be hard-pressed to find a better value. Generally speaking this mic would be a great fit for most female performers as well as baritone and tenor range male singers. For very husky sounding female and bass male voices I highly recommend trying before you buy due to its tendency to slightly exaggerate the lower range. EV N/D767a Product Page What's your take on the EV N/D767a? Feel free to send any comments and or suggestions to me directly at travis@travisnorth.net. Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  20. TMV World Team

    RODE M1 Vocal Microphone Review

    The Aussies Gave Us The Rode M1: Was It Worth While? Somebody told me once that Australia is like the United States minus about 10 years of progress. I didn't exactly get the point but I would have to disagree. The Aussies have given us things such as the Electric Drill as well as the modern WiFi standard ( Wireless LAN IEEE 802.11 ) used in just about every connected device out there from Laptops to e-Readers. They are also home to Rode Microphones.{C} A Brief History Of How The Rode M1 Came About Rode got its start in the late 1960's when two Swedes, Henry and Astrid Freedman, emigrated to Australia and opened a small pro audio shop according to the RODE website. They spent the next 20 years honing their craft and finally, in 1990, Rode Microphones was born with the release of the RODE NT1 studio mic. The NT1 was unique in that it was one of the first studio quality mic's introduced that was actually within reach of the project studio budget - a completely new market that was just coming into its own in the early 90's with the introduction of the DAW. Over the next 20 years they would continue to build on the original concept of the most microphone for the dollar in the studio. More recently however Rode has expanded into the live audio market with the RODE M1. Rode M1: Look And Feel Order from The Vocal Gear Store Click HERE I had to snicker a bit at the rather innovative packaging [ read: a CAN! ] the Rode M1 comes in. In typical Seattle fashion I initially thought to myself, "Well, this can be recycled right!?" Rode deserves points for originality and its nice to have another potential safe option for transport besides the standard soft case. Outside of said can-in-lieu-of-box the usual suspects of mic, clip, spec sheet, soft case can be found inside. The mic clip actually looks extra beefy compared to most. Extra bonus: If you register your mic on www.rodemic.com the 1 year warranty magically extends to a LIFETIME warranty! The M1 itself won't actually stop traffic with its looks but certainly won't send everyone packing. Just don't expect anyone to say "Hey dude! What kind of mic is that!?" Elegantly Understated is the operative phrase here. The dark satin gray finish looks classy and aside from the small Rode M1 lettering near the gold-plated XLR connection there are no other graphics. The gold dot near the pop screen is a nice throwback to Rode's start in capacitor mics but considering the M1 is a cardiod dynamic this is clearly decorative here. Rode M1: Useability In hand the Rode M1 feels solid and substantial at 360 grams. Comparatively speaking, the Shure Beta 58a weights in at 278g and the recently reviewed EV N/D767a is a relative flyweight at 260g. Despite the aforementioned porkiness, the Rode is fairly short at 171mm which combined with a relatively fat tapered body feels nicely balanced and comfortable. While the integral grill/pop filter feels pretty stout I would be a bit leary to see what happens the first time this mic gets dropped on its head. Rode M1: Specs As stated earlier, the Rode M1 is a dynamic mic and sports a cardiod pickup pattern. Rode advertises the frequency range as 75Hz - 18,000Hz which looking at the frequency graph seems about right. After a slight rise around 150-200Hz to probably add a touch of warmth theres a gradual rolloff from 150Hz down. Response upward from there is fairly flat with the exception of a broad bump of approximately +6db around 7-8000Hz which could lend itself towards a little air or sparkle to the vocals. Rode states it's sensitivity as -56dB ±2dB re 1V/Pa (1.6mV @ 94 dB SPL) @ 1kHz which is more or less inline with the Shure SM58 (1.85mV @ 94 dB SPL) and the Audix OM5 (1.8mV @ 94 dB SPL) with the outlier being the considerably more sensitive EV N/D767a at 3.1mV @ 94 dB SPL. Rode M1: Test For the sound test, I was fortunate enough to have a number of mic's at my disposal including the Audix OM5, Shure SM58, Shure Beta 87a, and of course, my trusty EV N/D767a - all dynamics with the exception of the Beta 87a. I came prepared with the instrumentals for a new track I'm working on and proceeded to work through the song with each of the mics starting with the Rode M1. Upon powering up the Rode M1 I noted that handling noise is quite low. Short of swinging the mic around wildly by its cable in raucous fashion, it definitely does just as good as its competition. Likewise, feedback with the cardiod pickup patte rn is also very well controlled. With the mains up at significantly high levels I had to get dangerously close to the PA speakers before feedback started rearing its ugly head. Plosives were also well controlled with thanks to fairly thick foam contained within the grill. Rode M1: Comparison If I had to make a comparison sound-wise I would call the Rode M1 the illegitimate love child of a SM58 and Beta87A.The Rode exhibits some of the warmness of the SM58 minus the muddiness but seems to share more of the natural flat frequency response sound of the Beta87A. As a result it almost sounds more akin to a condenser mic than a dynamic. The Rode M1 exhibits a nice but not overly pronounced airiness to vocals on the upper end and generally gives the vocals a clarity that is very studio-like in nature. When using both the OM5 and N/D767a I noticed just how much more presence both microphones had over the Rode. My voice sounded not only more full but while singing through some more challenging passages with some sustained belts hovering around high A/B I was actually able to use about 15-20% less effort vocally. Again with both the EV and OM5 the harmonics naturally present in my voice seemed to be better showcased than with the Rode. WRAP UP With the Rode M1, Rode has brought what amounts to a very solid addition into the already somewhat crowded live microphone arena. Their years of experience building top-notch yet within reach studio microphones has led them to create a live vocal mic that not only approaches condenser studio-like quality in sound but is built to withstand ridiculous amounts of abuse. I have a feeling a lot of these will be going strong well after the grill has crusted over with nasty green growth and the 10-year warranty expires. Your mileage may vary but at the end of the day my only gripe is that its natural sounding dynamics may not give your vocals as much cut through a live mix as you might want. On the flip side if you naturally have a bigger sounding voice and an Audix or EV borderlines on honky then th is may very well be an excellent option. Regardless, at $99 USD the Rode M1 is a hellava lot of microphone for the money and if you happen to be in the market for a new premium live mic then this one is certainly worth a look. Rode Microphones - www.rodemic.com Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  21. Is The Allen & Heath ZED-22FX Mixing Desk For You? Hello, everyone! My name is Sebastian Zuendorf (yes, even hard to pronounce in English for myself) and I'm both a sound engineer and singer. In the future, I will review some vocal-related products like microphones, mixers, effects processors and other equipment like that and show you what it can do for you. For now, I will tell you something about the Allen&Heath ZED-22FX small format mixing desk. And as this unit is fully dedicated to audio, it will be an audio review. Allen & Heath ZED-22FX Mixing Desk: Test Ok, let's get started with the overview in which I will tell you about the main features: Part 1: ZED-22FX Overview I hope you enjoy listening to these little samples from a very fine small format mixing desk. Made in China but engineered in the UK, it sounds quite good to my ears, is easy to operate and will last for years due to it's sturdy construction. You will find more information at the Allen&Heath Homepage. As always, I have to say I'm not a native speaker so please bear with me :-) Corrections and comments are very welcome! http://www.allen-heath.com/ahproducts/zed-22fx/ Review by Sebastian Zuendorf *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  22. TMV World Team

    Electro-Harmonix v256 Review

    Electro-Harmonix Vocoder: Dedicated To Voice At Last? "Don't they make guitar pedals?!," I thought to myself when I first got word of a new Electro-Harmonix Vocoder box coming home to roost in the The Modern Vocalist Journal test barn. While over the years a lot of EH pedals have likely been used for vocal effects in the name of experimentation it has only been within the last couple years that Electro-Harmonix have begun to develop a dedicated line of vocal effects processors including the v256 Vocoder, the Iron Lung, and Voice Box vocal synth processor. I say dedicated in that all 3 of these processors come with a built in mic pre-amp with XLR connections meaning you can actually plug a mic directly in without the necessity of an external mixer or separate pre-amp. Electro-Harmonix: Company History Electro-Harmonix got its start in the late 1960's when an R&B keyboard player named Mike Matthews had fi nally had enough of his salesman job at IBM and decided to focus on his music. Unfortunately the income stream as a musician wasn't going to cut the proverbial mustard to support both him and his wife so he set about working with an audio repair friend of his to manufacture and market a guitar fuzz pedal. At about the same time the demand for effects pedals was starting to pick up due to some cutting edge sounds featured on the latest albums by a few notable artists including Jimi Hendrix and the Rolling Stones. After some success distributing the pedal through a deal with the Guild Guitar Company, Matthews officially began developing and marketing new effects pedals including the Linear Power Booster and Big Muff under the name Electro-Harmonix. Over the next 20 years he would continue to primarily focus on the stomp box effects model until the mid 1980's when Electro-Harmonix changed directions to primary produce vacuum tubes. This would continue until the mid 90's when demand and prices for the vintage EH effect boxes started to increase on the secondary market at which time a decision was made to start manufacturing reissue versions of the original effects pedals. They were so well received that in 2002 Electro-Harmonix decided to expand on the original lineup which in 2009 included the creation of the v256 Vocoder. The Electro-Harmonix v256 Design And Durability: ANALOGUE? NO! OLD-SCHOOL? YES! The v256 Vocoder comes out of the box looking very much like the vintage 70's EH line complete with naked die-cast case and retro orange decals. This is by design as EH specs their new gear to look like the old-school versions right down to the switchgear. It's actually a refreshing departure from the typically menu-driven feature packed vocal effects boxes currently on the market. You won't find any LCD screens here. In it's place is a clean well-marked layout with simple LED mode lights, sturdy foot switches, micro-toggle switches and smooth rotary knobs. Don't be fooled into thinking this puppy is all analogue however. Removing the 4 screws holding the back plate on reveals a modern micro-processor controlled device. That being said on the input side of things you will find balanced XLR mic input with a high/low mic gain mode as well as phantom power for condenser mics as well as instrument control input and midi control in. Output includes a dry instrument out and balanced wet effects XLR out. Overall I have only two relatively small issues with the design. First is a +9v mini-power connector located in the rear which is affixed directly to the circuit board without any chassis reinforcement. While this is perfectly acceptable and not uncommon, it does raise some concern about long term durability. Considering most of the other connections and controls are chassis mounted it would have been nice to see one of the most used connection points also have more robust mounting. Secondly it would have been nice to see the 5 control knobs at the top of the device actually line up to their respective 12 0'clock positions in relation to the centered detents. Electro-Harmonix v256: Features And Modes Order Electro-Harmonix V256 Vocoder with Reflex-Tune from The Vocal Gear Store Click HERE The Electro-Harmonix v256 comes out o f the box with a total of 7 different modes: Robo-vocoder mode, single, major, and minor drone modes as well as transposition, instrument control and reflex-tune. Each mode can then be custom tailored via the blend, bands, tones, gender bender, and pitch controls. As you dial these into your liking you can set each custom setting to one of the respective 9 available presets. As a rock guy I don't tend to venture too deep into the vocal effects category aside from the usual delay/reverb. Instead I prefer to focus on delivering a solid vocal performance and don't necessarily want to concern myself with switching effects. So when I first fired up the v256 the only thing going through my head was how to potentially find a way to incorporate this into my material. My test of the v256 used a Rode NTK tube condenser mic to the vocoder and then routed through a TC Helicon Voice Live for a bit of delay/reverb to an otherwise dry mix. Starting at the top with the Robo-Vox mode after about 30 seconds of tweaking I was instantly reminded of the song Mr. Roboto off the 1983 Styx album Kilroy was Here. The next few modes consist of drone single note modes. With tweaks you can pretty much get as crazy and cartoonish as you want but in keeping with the theme of fitting these into my own material I focused primarily on the drone modes. With a little experimentation by primarily dialing down the blend and the gender bender controls in single drone mode, I was able to get some nice subtle undertone notes that gave the vocals a little extra kick on some simpler melody lines. Then bringing the gender bender back up to the 12 o'clock position the vocals took on a slick "doubled" effect. The other mode I found myself focusing more on was the minor drone mode. I took a song of mine with minor tonality feel and by adjusting the pitch and bands controls I was able to emulate a fairly convincing minor harmony tonality for a particular vocal line. Overall the real beauty of the v256 lies in it's simplicity of actually providing direct controls instead of menu's. This leads to worrying less about whether the mix is set at 38.5% or whatever and instead more on what it sounds like. That's not to say that you wouldn't necessarily want that type of finite control but sometimes the details and menu's can get in the way of creativity. I didn't spend as much time with the last 3 modes however they could certainly prove useful. Transposition does pretty much as you would think. The pitch control knob will directly transpose the note sung up to +/-1 octave. Here's your Barry White or Alvin and the Chipmunks sound. Instrument control enables an instrument to control the pitch with the amount of control being tweakable via the Pitch knob. Finally, Reflex-tune has the capability of giving you that T-Pain sound but should you turn the Pitch knob fully counter-clockwise will also act as plain pitch correction. After a few quick adjustments, I managed to g et some very natural smooth sounding basic pitch correction that in my opinion sounded every bit as good as some of the more fully-featured vocal boxes. WRAP UP: ORANGE BOX OF WONDERS Don't get me wrong. The v256 is not going to take the place of the primary effects box in your signal chain. It's something that must be used tastefully. However for something just calling itself a vocoder the EH v256 packs a lot in there. From wild Robo sounds to fairly realistic harmonies to simple pitch correction this device will find a use in just about any genre. The lack of menu driven architecture that is commonplace on the vast majority of vocal effects boxes today makes it easy to start dialing in your sounds and getting good results right away. It inspires you to be creative and makes it easy to step outside the box however sane or crazy that may be. Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  23. Double Review Of The VoiceTone Singles Series: R1 And C1 Yes, this is an article about the TC Helicon Voicetone Single s series. Before you even open your mouth I'll admit it: There have been moments where I may or may not have showed a bit of a partial bias towards TC Helicon. It was purely unintentional, I promise. Now before you go brushing this article off as another one written by a stark raving mad lunatic who does nothing but praise TC Helicon in all their brilliance hear me out: I find it difficult to not like things that just work. Without further adeau, I present you the TC Helicon VoiceTone R1 and its stablemate the VoiceTone C1. But wait you say! [Gasp!] He's...he's doing two products in a single review. Yeah, that's right in a bit of a departure from the norm this is a special double header TCH product review. Introducing The TC Helicon Voicetone Vocal Effects Pedal Line Those of you arriving late to the party [slackers] may not be familiar with the TC Helicon VoiceTone pedal line the Voicetone R1 (Red) and Voicetone C1 (Blue) represent 2 of the 7 stomp box Singles line that are chain-able effects pedals for vocals. Each pedal represents a single effect such as reverb, pitch correction, compression etc. and feature sturdy little stomp boxes with onboard mic preamps and intuitive analogue controls. The beauty of the lineup is the simplicity. It's a refreshing departure from some of the other more complex menu driven offerings from TC Helicon and others which is not to say sometimes you may not want that. You do. However think of it more as everything you want and none of what you don't. Do you just need reverb? Get the Voicetone R1. Pitch correction, Megaphone, Reverb and Doubling? You get the idea. Go to Voicetone Singles Series for the full lineup.So the task at hand was a full test of the TC Helicon Voicetone R1 and C1: Testing The TC HELICON Voicetone R1 The R1 like the rest of the Singles lineup features the typical I/O setup of Mic in/signal out with USB port for firmware upgrades. Standard here too is wall-wart power supply which once I had 4 pedals chained together due to the standard plug orientation as opposed to the sideways style effectively blocked over half the plugs on my power supply. Fortunately, TC Helicon does offer a special "singles connect kit" that links up to 4 pedals together you can check out here. I would probably recommend it if nothing else but to save your sanity. As with the others the Voicetone R1 comes equipped with a signal/clip led, effect in/out foot switch with status light, mic gain control and a micro switch to remotely enable/disable mic control from the TC Helicon MP-75 microphone. From an effect control standpoint the R1 has but two dials: Reverb type and Dry/Wet mix. Of the former the R1 comes with 8 different types: Hall, Plate, Theater, Club, Room, Studio, Ambience and Arena. With the Voicetone R1 plugged into my signal chain with the others I initially dialed up the Room effect with dry/wet mix centered. For my rehearsal space which is relatively live this initially proved to be a bit but I was struck at how naturally non mechanical the reverb sounded. Once I dialed the mix back to about 1/3 to find the sweet spot I was actually impressed. It's clear that TC has clearly done their homework in regards to reverb algorithms and come a long ways since the earlier days of the original TC VoiceLive which I have been adamant about not putting in the closet - yet. That may well change with the Voicetone R1. Of the other reverbs I found theater to lend itself especially well to big slower tempo tunes and gave the vocals the ability to breath and shimmer. In fact there's really nothing here you won't be able to find a use for. Testing The TC HELICON Voicetone C1 Order directly from The Vocal Gear Store - Click HERE The Voicetone C1 is an interesting little bugger and represents TC's take on hard tune and pitch correction and will give you anything from mild pitch correction to some pretty crazy T-Pain style vocals. In addition to all the I/O of the Voicetone R1 the Voicetone C1 also features a 1/4" instrument input in support of pitch correction through guitar input. On board the Voicetone C1 are 3 rotary controls: Pitch Correction Mode, correction hardness, and gender. Pitch correction can be selected by specific key or chromatically. Inserting a guitar input thereby overrides the selected mode. Pitch correction hardness controls how severely the unit reacts to approximate the vocals at the correct pitch. The softer the correction the more natural the sound. Dial it harder if you want to be Cher - "Do you Believe". I promise I won't tell. Finally, a gender control allows for a neutral "normal voice" setting with lower and higher voices on opposing sides. Admittedly this is where things can get pretty weird. So go wild. Now let me be honest I'm more of a straight up singer kinda chap and I'm not huge into live vocal pitch correction. I worry about anything that could pose the potential to take away from what makes a live performance, flaws and all. I may have even not so many years ago been an elitist classically trained choir boy with a private university music scholarship who thought pitch correction was for amateurs. But I digress I may as of late become more accepting. The question for me with the Voicetone C1 was can it take already good vocals and give them a bit of extra polish? In a word yes. But it really depends on what you are trying to do vocally. It goes without saying you can't polish a turd. However feed the Voicetone C1 something reasonably good and I can say with confidence with the scale set to chromatic I saw some fairly transparent correction with the harness control around 1/4. I was concerned that even a low setting the Voicetone C1 might be too grabby at the pitch but it turned out the C1 could play nice. This came to light during my last 3 hour intensive rehearsal session. While battling a cold my voice was beginning to tire towards the end of the intensive giving me some minor spotty pitch issues but I was surprised to find switching the Voicetone C1 in significantly cleaned things up. It was perfect mind you nor should it be expected to be but I was nonetheless pleasantly pleased. Order TC Helicon 996008005 Singles Connect Kit Vocal Effects P rocessor from The Vocal Gear Store NOW! Click HERE WRAP UP PRO: Bottom line another two easy to use vocal stomp boxes from TC that give you excellent results out of the box, R1 reverb is rather excellent, C1 can actually play nice CON: Chunky power supplies consume strip space and singers sanity, the connector kit is moderately expensive at $50, a mounting board or case that turns into a pedal board would be nice Contacting TC-Helicon www.tc-helicon.com TC-Helicon Vocal Technologies 1075 Pendergast Street, Suite 204 Victoria BC V8V 0A1 Canada (800) 565-2523 Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  24. Keeping Your Voice In Shape With Superior Vocal Health Products While there is certainly no miracle solution for inflamed vocal chords or exhausted muscles I had the opportunity to spend a few weeks using a series of herbal vocal health products from Superior Vocal Health with interesting results. Here the saying you can't polish a turd holds true- that is there is only so much you can do with a vocal performance that is pitchy, raspy, or otherwise just plain tired and overworked. With all the cool new toys coming out for vocalists lately it's easy to sometimes get lulled into the mindset of my "XXXX" vocal processor can make me sound like a god. Admittedly they can help but there are limitations, those being your physical health, technique and overall vocal health. A tired body, lousy te chnique or tired voice won't make for a good performance. The former two are completely in your control but what about a sick or otherwise overworked voice? Superior Vocal Health Products: A Full Vocal Care Solution As vocalists we have all experimented around with different concoctions in hopes of finding one that works the best. Personally I have tried all varieties of throats sprays, gargles, teas, as well as various types of alcohol with varying effectiveness. Whiskey is my pick in case you were curious. Others try more non conventional things: Chris Cornell likes to chain smoke before hand so it gives him his signature vocal rasp. Vanessa Williams eats potato chips prior to a performance because it imparts an extra vocal sizzle. It all can be summed up into one part science, one part voodoo and one part placebo which I might add is a real effect that has been proved in clinical studies. David Katz of Superior Vocal Health offers a twist in that his products are meant to be used as a full vocal health care solution used together instead of a single stand-alone product. Meet Superior Vocal Health Founder: David Katz Boys and girls meet David Katz, founder of Superior V ocal Health. Mr. Katz is a veteran of the voice profession with more than 22 years performing internationality in Opera, Broadway and popular music. During that time he has also worked as a voice coach, nutritional consultant and herbalist with his primary focus on vocal health. Superior Vocal Health is the culmination of over 10 years of research towards finding a solution to keeping vocal chords in optimal health-even during the most demanding of times. From his own personal experience David has created Superior Vocal Health as a way to share his findings and help other vocalists maintain optimal vocal health. Superior Vocal Health: The Product Range Lineup Superior Vocal Health: Throat Saver Spray The Superior Vocal Health Throat Saver spray according to the documentation is a product designed to keep the throat and vocal chords moist as well as break up nasal secretions at the back of the throat. Out of the 3 products I had at my disposal this ended up being my go-to bottle due to the convenience of the spray which was easy to pack around to rehearsals. I found the throat spray when used in conjunction with regular sips of mildly warm tap water throughout a rehearsal to be quite effective in keeping my vocal chords well lubricated for the duration of even the most intensive session. While I was a bit vocally tired after the session my voice still sounded strong and I didn't have to work as hard to overcome the dryness that usually comes after a long set. I also liked that after using it the spray seemed to actually coat the throat for sometime afterwards before dissipating which reduced the need t o overuse the product. In addition the taste is actually quite palatable. The best I can describe it is peppermint-like with a hint of ginger. Overall the Uperior Health Throat Saver spray is a well thought out product that works well to maintain an already healthy voice when used in conjunction with proper technique and normal hydration. Superior Vocal Health: Vocal Rescue Gargle On to the second product in the lineup - Vocal Rescue gargle. Let's say you've been sick or have managed to already overwork your voice but you've still got to perform. That's where the gargle comes into play. Initially, I was a bit skeptical of a product promising to bring back to life an already dead voice. In fact the first few times I used the product on an already healthy voice it actually seemed to have the opposite effect by causing my vocal folds to become slightly irritated and feel more constricted. As a result, the Vocal Rescue gargle sat unused on the counter for a week or two until one evening where I was working on a particularly challenging track that essentially stays pegged up in the G4-C5 range the entire 3 1/2 minutes. As as a leggerio tenor with my break sitting right at A4/B4 the entire song weaves in an out of belt/head voice so it's a bit of a workout. Nothing I can't handle but doing the same song over an over again can start to wear. Finally after the 4th pass through my technique started to slip thus my voice started to become rather tired-enough to have to stop. I needed to finish the track that evening so immediately I mixed up a glass of warm water and put in 2 droppers worth of Vocal Rescue. After gargling for approximately 30 seconds I decided to give the track another shot. Suprisingly I had about 95% of my voice back --enough to finish the track. The combination of licorice root, ginger and other proprietary ingredients had a rather profound effect on bringing my voice back. This is quite honestly the first product I've found to be this effective in restoring a very overworked voice to serviceable condition. Superior Vocal Health: Sinus Clear Out The final product in the Superior Vocal Health series was the Sinus Clear Out. There's nothing worse during a performance that suffering from congested sinuses. I typically find when working late into the evening that sometimes this happens to me and not only does it effect how you breath but your sound as well which is simply not acceptable. Sinus Clear Out promises to address this. So how does it work? Actually rather well. Over the course of the testing weeks I did not ever have a full blown cold with severe congestion but I did find it to work well for mild congestion issues. Similar to the Vocal Rescue it uses a dropper but instead of gargling Sinus Clear Out is intended to be dropped directly on the back of your tongue. There you let it sit for a few seconds while inhaling the vapors, then swallow. While it is fairly effective I tended to only use it when absolutely necessarily due to the taste which is a bit harsh and during the first few uses led me to feel a bit nauseous for the first few minutes after use. WRAP UP: Herbal Goodness, Naturally Overall the Superior Vocal Health product lineup brings to the table an innovative take on herbal vocal health care solutions by offering a one-stop complete suite of products for the typical vocal health issues we as vocalists deal with every day. SVH uses all natural FDA certified herbal ingredients backed by a manufacturing process that does not contain any chemicals or alcohol. As with any herbal supplement you should check the label before using to ensure you do not have any existing allergies and as always use in moderation. When used along with proper technique I would have no problem recommending you give Super Vocal Health a try if you are aiming to be on top of your vocal game 100% of the time. Getting In Touch With Superior Vocal Health Superior Vocal Health www.superiorvocalhealth.com (888) - 480-9957 Superior Vocal Health can also be found at www.JustGottaSing.com. #1 Supplier of Vocal Products in the Industry! Click HERE >>> to find Superior Vocal Health Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  25. TC Helicon VoiceTone D1 Stomp Box: Better Sound Effects For Vocalists? No matter where you look every market has two kinds of companies: those that innovate and those that imitate. Consider the old Apple OS vs. Microsoft Windows comparison [pretty much a direct rip-off] or German vs. Japanese auto manufacturers [a la Lexus LS400 being pretty much a copy of a Mercedes S-Class ]. Sometimes the imitation ends up being better than the original but sometimes the original turns out to be pretty difficult to improve upon. Enter TC Helicon with their brand new line of vocal effects pedals - VoiceTone Singles including the VoiceTone D1 reviewed here. TC Helicon VoiceTone D1: Philosophy Order from The Vocal Gear Store - Click Here Whether or not you are familiar with the name, TC Helicon is one of the leading pioneers of cutting edge vocal effects and processing. They were one of the first to realize working singers and vocalist's as well as professionals want affordable full control over their sound the same way a guitar player wants control over their axe. Since the introduction of the or iginal VoiceLive 1 of which your author owns and still uses one daily, many industry players have followed suit with similar vocal effects offerings but I digress. The original [TC Helicon] still sets a very high standard. The only beef I sometimes have with Helicon gear in general is their over-complexity. It's the old story of everything you want times 1000. Due to the menu-driven approach of some of their other offerings I have sometimes found it less than simple to find the sound I'm looking for which can be a drag in a live situation. This time around TC has a solution with a new line of vocal stomp pedals which are a bit of a departure from their brethren. With the new TC singles: gone are the menu driven LCD/LED displays and the multitudes of effects. In their place come devices that focus on one type of effect each and lie within a compact footprint with robust build quality and a beautifully simplistic layout. TC Helicon VoiceTone D1: A Closer Look Over the past few weeks I've had a chance to play around in depth with the VoiceTone D1 Doubling and Detune pedal with currently lists at Guitar Center for $149.00 + tax. If you're familiar with TC it should come as no surprise that this little pedal on first glance looks and feels more expensive than it is. With chassis mounted gold-plated XLR connections, rubberized well-labeled knobs with smooth detents and an all-metal housing with anti-slide rubberized base the build quality is first class. TC Helicon VoiceTone D1: Controls Starting topside on the Voice Tone D1, you'll find only 3 simple controls: A knob for the type of doubling selected, a Dry/Wet control and an engaged/bypass footswitch. The only indicators you'll find are a red LED to signify if the doubler is engaged and a green signal indicator light. On left and right sides of the unit are a built-in input gain control and Mic control respectively for when an TC Helicon MP-75 mic is used. For those of you unfamiliar with the MP-75 it features a built-in button to control the engaged/bypass function on the pedal itself via standard XLR cable. O n the backside are your in/out XLR connections, power in and mini-USB for future firmware upgrades. TC Helicon VoiceTone D1: Useability Aesthetics and build quality aside the real clincher is obviously how useful the VoiceTone D1 is in the wild. The short answer: pretty dang good. With the VoiceTone D1, at your disposal are a total of 8 types of doubling and detuning: Tight, Loose, Group, Detune, Thick, Octave Up, Octave Down, and Shout. The only configuration limitation is that changing an effect type mid-song requires bending down to manually change the active setting as opposed to some of the bigger TC boxes (VoiceLive2, CreateXT) which with allow you select and scroll through effects via the foot switches. It's a minor annoyance and quite honestly well worth the trade-off of ditching the menu's. TC Helicon VoiceTone D1: Test While on the VoiceTone D1 there is no dud to be found in the 8 available presets in practice I found myself more often than not gravitating towards 3 of the 8 settings: Loose, Thick, an Octave Up. With Loose activated and the Dry/Wet knob around the 9 0'clock position I found the VoiceTone D1 to add a subtle yet realistic doubling effect to my vocals. Sure every effects box has a doubling setting but generally I find them to be less than realistic sounding. To this day I have yet to find the right magical combination of settings on my VoiceLive that gives a convincing doubler. Bam! With the D1 I had a setting ready to go that sounded great in about 10 seconds. Activating the Thick setting this time with the dry/wet mix at about 11 0'clock resulted in a pretty cool effect that lent itself well to more whispery type vocals a la Chino of the Deftones. To up the ante I added in a VoiceTone T1 Adaptive Tone pedal to the signal chain. With the combination of the Thickening and slick compression of the T1 my whisper-like vocal lines became larger than life and easily soared over the rest of the band. I now had an amazing new sound with less than 2 minutes of work. I nearly wet myself. The final effect I spent time experimenting with was Octave Up. If any of you read my review of the Electro-Harmonix v256 you know I had managed after a bit of tweaking to achieve a similar effect. Personally I like the vocal layering effect it can give when used under the right conditions. I found it most useful when I was utilizing the lower half of my range below middle C. Here the VoiceTone D1 sounds about on par with the v256 but it took me 10 seconds to dial in my sounds rather than 5 minutes. WRAP UP: Plug, Select, Twirl, Repeat Overall the beauty of the TC Helicon D1 is in its simplicity and top-notch construction. There is no need to spend hours tweaking and retweaking to find the exact setting you want. Simply plug it in, select your effect, twirl the mix to suit your liking and go. It's compact design adds minimally to what you already pack around in your signal chain and t he quality of the effects themselves are without question up to TC's high level of standards. VoiceTone D1 aside the introduction of the VoiceTone Singles proves that TC is still on top of their game and continues to lead the industry as innovators not imitators. Stay tuned as we have more TC Singles in the pipe for review including the Adaptive Tone T1, Vocal Tuned Reverb R1, and Hard Tune and Correction C1. Video: TC Helicon Voicetone Singles Series (Including Voicetone D1) Getting In Touch With TC Helicon TC Helicon - www.TC-Helicon.com Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.