TMV World Team

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  1. RODE Microphones brings the big guns to iOS with the iXY RODE i-XY Podcast However good they claim to be I've always been a bit leary of using iOS devices along with the loads of 3rd party plug-in devices for anything remotely related to audio. Most surmount to little more than toys with sketchy build quality and laughable user interfaces that inevitably result in more irritation and poor quality sound than the price of admission. Australia-based Rode Microphones hopes to change that perception with the introduction of their iXY Stereo Microphone. Immediately out of the box its clear that Rode has brought the proverbial gun to a knife fight. The i-XY is unquestionably one of the most professional looking iThings to plug into the 30 pin dock of an iOS device. Side note - sorry iPhone 5 adopters there isn't an i-XY for you - yet. The Rode i-XY features twin stereo capsules in a clever X/Y stereo configuration and is housed in a rather attractive silver alloy casing. Machined allen-head screws complete with Rode's trademark gold pickup area dot and a b uilt-in power on indicator light fill out the look. Construction is in fact so robust that in hand it feels almost as if Rode constructed the iXY out of a solid block of aluminum. The 30 pin connector fits rather tightly into the base of your iOS device leaving little concern for getting dislodged. Along with the iX Y unit comes twin foam wind screens as well as a compact hard zipped carrying case. Rode also provides a recording app - RØDE Rec - for download in the iTunes store. More on that below. Order RODE i-XY Recording Microphone for iPhone and iPad from The Vocal Gear Store I tested the i-XY with a variety of sound sources from spoken voice to acoustic guitar as well as a rather l oud metal concert. The i-XY seemed to handle all with relative ease and had more than enough headroom to preserve the original recording without clipping or phasing issues. The noise floor was reasonably low for a field recording microphone with minimal background noise when recording in quieter settings such as acoustic guitar. However, as expected, the Rode did prefer to be as close to the source as possible especially when dealing with soft-spoken tracks. Overall the iXY gives any high-quality field recording array some solid competition from the standpoint of preserving the original source. While the Rode i-XY is an impressive piece of hardware on its own the available Rode Rec iOS app is what makes the i-XY shine. Starting with the ability to track in 24-bit 96 kHz resolution the Rode Rec app also features built-in editing much like a DAW as well as the ability to add various effects such as compression, EQ and some additional processing courtesy of Izotope. While recording you also have the option of live monitoring through the iPhone/iPads build in 1/8" mini jack. The main recording transport screen features quick rather accurate metering that's a nice bonus and when the device is flipped sideways the transport gives way to simple yet intui tive editing screen which allows for simple to more complex fades and trimming. Once you complete your recording tapping the 'Share' tab reveals a rather complete set of file sharing including SoundCloud, Dropbox and the usual email and iTunes options. Talking about iPhones and iPads, take a look on this wonderful iPad accessory - Hercules DG305B iPad Holder, order online from The Vocal Gear Store When it comes high-quality field recording for iOS devices Rode brings their A-Game with the iXY. They've managed to package high-quality hardware with a clever and complete recording application that in our opinion negates the need to carry around a separate field recording device. The Rode iXY is available now for $199.00 on the street. The Rode Rec (not included) is available for $5.99 in the iTunes store. ~TN i -XY Specifications Acoustic PrinciplePressure GradientCapsule0.50"Polar PatternAddress TypeEndFrequency Range20Hz - 20kHzMaximum SPL120dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)Sensitivity-42.0dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (8.52mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHzEquivalent Noise Level (A-weighted)18dB-APower Options(Powered by iOS device)Weight40.00gm 46.00mmH x 55.00mmW x 40.00mmD http://www.rode.com/microphones/ixy Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  2. INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER I would argue that the TC-Helicons pedal style vocal effects are some of the best ideas to come out of their facility in Vancouver, BC. They are small form factor, intuitive to control and easy to get a great sound out of. No menu's to navigate, just simple rotary knobs, buttons and a master on/off footswitch. They are in my opinion a joy to use. The TC Helicon Harmony Singer is no different. Rotary controls for harmony type, wetness and reverb line the top along with a Tone button borrowed from the Mic Mechanic and a master switch flesh out the top. On the sides are the typical mic control switch along with instrument in and through as well as a thoughtful ground lift. On the back you'll usually find mic in/through as well as power and USB ports for firmware updates. What makes the magic happen, though, is the instrument in port. TC Helicon calls the Harmony Singer "Guitar Controlled". I imagine you could plug any kind of instrument generating tone and a line level signal but if you opt to use the TC Helicon Harmony Singer without anything you'd be selling yourself short. Why? Because the real beauty behind this TCH box is that it uses instrument pitch to perfectly dictate the harmonies produced. Aptly put your harmonies will always be in the correct key. Always. And that is what makes the Harmony Singer awesome. Don't miss the chance! Use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50 THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER: IN PRACTICE In practice, it took me little time to dial in something that sounded pretty convincing. The Harmony Singer gives you a pretty reasonable selection of harmonies from a 6th below all the way to a 5th above as well as mixes of the two so provided you don't have a lead vocal that's completely bonkers chances are you'll be able to find something that will fit. The key here to maintain realism is to use harmonies sparingly and to find the right place for them to sit in the mix in relation to the lead vocals using the Level knob. It would also help if you do have some basic understanding of chord structure to determine the optimal sounding harmony for the particular application. THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER: WRAP UP All in after spending a few weeks with the TC Helicon Harmony singer I can honestly say this is the first harmony effects box I've used that is both easy to use and produces realistic harmonies. It's not the real thing and I wouldn't use it in place of human produced harmonies in the studio but in a live situation its one more useful tool to add to your vocal toolbox. THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER: SPECIFICATIONS Mic Input Level @ 0 dBFS: -42dBu to +1dBu Mic input SNR: >104 dB Phantom Power: 24V (always on) Guitar Input Impedance: 1 MOhm Guitar Input Level @ 0 dBFS: -7 dBU to 17 dBu Guitar Input SNR: >115dB Dynamic Range: >104 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz Frequency Response: +0/-0.3 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz Control: USB for firmware and control Mic Control: using TC-Helicon MP-75 Microphone or Sennheiser e 835 fx mic For more info: www.tchelicon.com Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  3. INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON VOICE LIVE TOUCH 2 They call it a "Vocal-Designer". Interesting, I thought to myself while unpacking the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 from its box. As the name implies TC-Helicon has released a new version of its innovative 'Touch' series which builds upon the original Voice Live Touch. I'll be upfront and say that I never had the opportunity to try out the original Voice Live Touch so this review will strictly be based on my experience with the new unit: the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2. Gone are the colorful touch pads and diminutive LED screen. Instead, the Touch 2 is more serious wrapped in subdued grey with a much more usable LCD screen. Being this is a very menu driven device I imagine this is a welcome change to the original Touch users. TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2: Build This product can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. As with all TC-Helicon gear, the build quality of the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 makes it feel like every bit of its $500 street value. There are no manual knobs and buttons on the Touch 2. Instead, every control aside from a mic gain knob is a touch pad. It's an interesting design concept that is going to work for some but may be troublesome for others. The layout is generally straightforward and once you get a hold of the basics of how to drive into settings, the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is fairly intuitive. I wish TC Helicon had given thought to backlighting their pads as I can see having issues in a dark club environment finding the right pad to hit, especially if you prefer as I do to not stand mount it. As a workaround, I highly recommend using their 3 button foot control available for purchase separately. TC Helicon touts the VL2 as giving singers "unprecedented creative control of their live sound with state-of-the-art vocal effects and performance looping in an intuitive touch layout." This I agree with. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 packs an enormous catalog of preset effects to get you started sorted by genre such as Rock, Pop, Alternative etc. that mock the vocal effects used on a large v ariety of hit socks. If that isn't enough they are continually updating the catalog that is downloadable directly to the VLT2's using VoiceLive support. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 In Practice The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is pretty much ready to go out of the box. Built in is TC's fabulous adaptive tone which automagically applies adaptive EQ, compression and de-ess to your voice. It almost always sounds great and it certainly does on the Touch 2. Every effect is just about infinitely customizable on the Touch 2 including all the usual suspects of HardTune, tap delay, reverb, harmony, doubling, choir, and transducer. However, I generally found myself starting with one of the built-in presets and then customizing it to fit my sound. One of the more interesting features added on the Touch 2 is an effects "slider" that allows you to a choc tweak with your sound as you go. TC has come a long ways with their harmony algorithms by syncing them up with instrument input to ensure they are always on point and realistic sounding. The Touch 2 adds to the flexility of this by incorporating 8 total voices (more than you'd likely every need) and what they call "RoomSense". If one doesn't have an instrument to plug into the VoiceLive, the two onboard microphones take it the chord structures based off what its hearing in the room to decide how to apply the harmonies. I would argue there's no replacement for real harmonies, but this comes so damn close that admittedly even I have started using them. Another key feature to point out is the 6 track TC VLOOP performance looper. This is where things can really get creative with the ability to record your vocals on the fly for up to 30 seconds. The Touch 2 is so intelligent that it will even quantize those for you for perfect loops. One you have your loops you than then add Reverse, Filter, Slow Speed, Squeeze and Squeeze Auto to really make things interesting. Overall I felt that the looper was well done and simple enough that it could be used in a live situation. CONCLUSIONS about The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is without question an extremely powerful tool. At the end of the day, it does however, cater itself slightly more towards the studio and solo artist than it does to more of a rocker like myself. I felt the menu-driven design and touch interface left me spending more time in trial and error before finding a sound than I would have spent flipping a knob or hitting a switch on the Voice Tone series pedals. In my opinion, though, TC has found a niche within a niche market with the VLT2. If this looks like it might be your kinda thing I recommend you check it out.
  4. In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50
  5. Hi all, I've been a-looking for a lo-fi mic for sometime now to use in the studio and, mainly, live (some of you may have read my endless posts on other forums). I finally came across the Wasaphone I on eBay and I absolutely love it. I just wanted to share the fruits of my quest with y'all and hope that others will enjoy their gear as I do. They are affordable and nail the tonal balance of grit and warmth. There's a great lil' demo of their flagship model here: If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50
  6. Recently a new platform for music professionals called Music Gateway was launched. Music Gateway is a business platform connecting music professionals from around the globe in one simple, easy to use website. It's not so much a LinkedIn of the music industry as a complete collaboration solution where you can post and receive projects and collaborate on them in a secure environment. If you are looking for ways to find paid session work or find new talent to collaborate with beyond your direct network, Music Gateway might be just the thing you need. You can reach out o n a global scale and provide your services to other professionals, equally you can hire & source other music pro's and develop your career with feedback following each project. Your profile acts as a portfolio for other users to review. Interview With Jon Skinner, Managing Director Music Gateway To find out more about Music Gateway and how it could benefit individual musicians, we met up with Jon Skinner, Managing Director of Music Gateway and initiator of the platform. Q: Tell our audience something about yourself and your personal relation to music and the music industry My name is Jon Skinner, I have been in the industry since 1987, so getting on f or 27 years. Very similar to most people's stories, music at an early age was a passion and I got a drum kit when I was 6 years old. I've always had a good ear for music and was so lucky that the DJ's around where I lived as a teenager introduced me to Motown, Northern Soul, Two Tone and a wide variety of musical styles. When hop hip and break dance broke in 1983, I was hooked and started buying underground records & US imports from the states, those were special times for me. As far as Industry goes, I set up my own independent record shop in 1991 and I never looking back. Q: What made you decide to start Music Gateway? My experiences in the industry became the backbone of the system, it was very clear to me that there was this big hole in the industry regarding the connection between all the creation roles, especially on a global scale. I've felt the pain & struggled through that journey, I know the pitfalls and barriers people face and still face to this day. For me, Music Gateway is about empowering people to A&R their own projects, as relying on others most of the time doesn't work. Q: What sets Music Gateway apart from social media platforms targeted at musicians? First and foremost we aren't a social media platform, this is a fundamental point. We are strictly a business to business website and you only make a connection to another user if there is a purpose, a goal and end result for your recording. You don't built up followers or connections, we are about generating work and connecting professionals to the right people and their music projects. Q: Can you explain how music gateway will be a unique service especially for singers? Producers need singers, singers need producers. The key issue is finding the right person who is first of all, like-minded musically, and can work either to your budget or wants to co-write and or collaborate with you. Music Gateway is a targeted way of connecting to the right person for your project. You can receive work opportunities free of any charge, we only charge a fee if you receive paid work or a meaningful connection to another pro. Furthermore, reaching out to other singers, songwriters and professionals is essential to learn and develop your experience and skills in the industry. Finally, it's important that people understand we are in the bu siness of music and therefore if you are new to the industry you need help, guidance & support, this is what we offer. Q: You have received support for Music Gateway from many big names in the music industry. What is it you think that won them over? How did they respond when you first contacted them? The main response has been, wow OK it's so simple why didn't I think of it? I think there will have been hundreds of people who have had the same idea, that's the easy bit, the hard bit is developing such a system, which handling transactions, files and pretty complex functionality in the backend, whilst keeping it ultra simple for the users. In a word 'Unique'. We are the only website which is focused on the creative process, hooking up like-minded musicians on a global scale. We are a very clear benefit to the industry as a whole and this is why I believe we have received so much support from the core industry organizations. Q: Tell us something about the technology behind the platform and how it sets you apart from other platforms? We are very functional, it's about project management and allowing anyone on the site to Post a Project defining their need. When you create a project, you can define what it is you want to get done or who you want to reach out to, for example as a singer, you may want to connect with a producer to record a song, or look to hire a remixer to remix an existing song. You may need a song from a songwriter or seek to co-write with a musician. The options are endless. Equally, when you set up your profile and define your skills, we notify you of relevant projects which you can review and decide to PITCH (apply) for the work, this whole process and project management is unique. When a project starts the users are granted access to a workspace area, which is where you can manage your project files, this makes it easy to manage any project with anyone in the world, with message systems for communication and timeline feedback on audio files. Q: What is it about the unique community of singers at The Modern Vocalist World that interests you? Having spoken at length with Robert the founder and reviewing the resources on the website, it's clear that there is a great community of singers engaging through the forum and seeking advice & support. We feel that Music Gateway compliments the site perfectly, as we are focused on session work and music creation, which is a natural progression for anyone new to the world of singing and the industry. Q: Last but not least: why do you feel individual musicians should sign up for Music Gateway? What are the direct benefits? It's free for starters, it's free to pitch for project work and free to receive work opportunities. If you want to further your career, receive targeted and relevant work based on your skills, there is no other website like Music Gateway. For protection, you can manage any client work via the site and receive secure payments through the system and your account wallet. Reaching out and developing your own projects is fundamental if you are going to get ahead in the industry, staying local all the time, doesn't cut it anymore, you have to look further afield and work on a global scale. We only make a charge if you benefit through project work, so it's 100% fair. Without question Music Gateway has just shifted the power to the independent and helps remove industry barriers, register for free and create a Music Gateway Account. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - And if you want to improve your vocal skills, we have the right product just for:
  7. Putting The TC-Helicon MP-75 To The Test If somehow you hadn't noticed there has been an absolute explosion over the last 5 years of excellent professional quality vocal gear designed to give the modern vocalist absolute control over his or her sound. With the likes of EV, DigiTech, and Electro-Harmonix in the game the list is long and noteworthy. All focus on multiple product lines supporting a broad variety of instruments. Non-focus specifically on the vocalist which is a crown that solely belongs to TC Helicon. Arguably they wear it pretty well. The TC-HELICON MP-75 AND MP-70: DIFFERENCES The same outfit headquartered in British Columbia, Canada that brought us the VoiceLive, VoiceTone, and VoiceWorks have now introduced 2 new fully in-house designed professional live microphones: The TC-Helicon MP-70, featuring a dynamic super-cardioid capsule with neodymium magnet and MP-75 building on the MP-70 with the addition of a mic control circuit. This switch is designed to interface with existing TCH vocal processors allowing you to control effects directly via a recessed micro switch located on the MP-75. TC-Helicon MP-75: DESIGNED FOR VOCALISTS When design started for the MP series microphones TC Helicon had never to date built a microphone. So what did they do? Borrow a capsule from another manufacturer and build around that? Nope. TC instead designed a brand new microphone from the ground up utilizing what are in typical TC fashion very high-grade components and top rate construction. TC has designed what they call a "modern performance vocal microphone"; A vocal mic specifically designed for the way we as modern vocalists sing using amplification. Vocals in modern music are much more than a mic and a PA and as an artist you deserve to have the best performance every time. Call it controlling your own destiny. Taking that control a bit further is the MP-75. As luck would have it TC Helicon was gracious enough to bestow upon us a fresh one to run through the paces . LIS-WHAT? Retailing on the street for $169 the MP-75 features what TC calls a Lismer capsule which is a proprietary design consisting of a patented Neodymium magnet structure suspended by a dual shock mount for low handling noise. Helicon is mum about construction detail specifics so all we know is the diaphragm itself consists of some type of dual material construction. TC-Helicon MP-75 CASE Upon opening the TCH container we find the MP-75 stored inside a padded cylindrical mic case emb lazed with TC Helicon logos. This is a tasty detail touch that is a step up from the mic "baggies" everyone else provides. While I wouldn't necessarily recommend dropping it off a building the design is nevertheless fairly beefy. The case top unzips to reveal the MP-75. TC-Helicon MP-75 ERGONOMICS The MP-75 itself is actually a rather handsome mic. Coated in a subtle sparkle gray finish with relatively large ovoid pop screen the mic has rather nice ergonomics with a comfortably sized handle and pronounced kneck taper that fits well in the hand without fatigue. At the base of where the taper starts up towards the mic head lies the triangular shaped purple-hued control circuit button. Unscrewing the pop screen reveals the beauty extends inward as well with what appears to be a fairly large diameter capsule similar in size to the huge EV N/D767A. The shock mount is equally as nice with plenty of give for aggressive singers and low handling noise. USING THE TC-Helicon MP-75 In a rehearsal environment with full band, the TC MP-75 was plugged into my signal chain consisting of a VoiceLive1, VoiceTone T1 and VoiceTone D1. I initially set it up to control only my VoiceTone D1 doubler pedal and made sure the mic control button on the T1 adaptive dynamics pedal was disengaged as I like to leave it engaged 100% of the time. I was initially struck as to how big and rich the MP-75 sounds. With the mixer EQ fully zeroed out I felt no need to make any adjustments as it sounded great as is with my voice being more of the Leggerio/Lyric tenor and subsequently carrying a bit less weight than that of baritone/bass singers. Some vocalists may find they need to dial back the low end slightly to avoid a bit of muddiness. I found the Helicon to demonstrate and excellent amount of cut that allowed me to easily be heard over the band without being anywhere near the point of feeding back. This is where the MP-75 absolutely crushes any other live performance microphone I have used to date. Nothing I could do from cranking the PA to cupping the mic to pointing it directly at my monitors could get it to feedback. Quite honestly the MP-75 has some of the best feedback rejection properties I have ever seen in a live mic. That finally brings us to the other little detail setting the MP-75 apart from the pack - it's simple control switch. S o simple in fact that all you can do is switch an effect on or off. For some reason, however, that is absolutely awesome. No longer do I have to be near my pedal board when a song change is coming ready to switch. Suddenly it's also easier to switch multiple effects at once. For example now instead of using two feet to simultaneously change a setting on my VL1 and D1 I can engaged the D1 directly from the mic. It's simple yet oh so practical. So window dressing aside: has TC managed to create something that sets itself apart from the 99,000 other excellent alternatives out there? I think so. Combined with its excellent dynamics, nice cut and superior feedback rejection properties along with it currently being the only mic out there with onboard effects control TC has in my opinion effectively managed to encapsulate a true modern vocalists microphone. It's a pretty safe bet the MP-75 is going to be my new go-to mic for the foreseeable future. So tell us TC when can we expect a wireless version? The TC-Helicon MP75 Can Be Purchased at Amazon.com *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  8. Vocal Twang is a term that refers to a physical configuration for the singing voice that is characterized by tilt of the thyroid cartilage, compression on the vocal folds and an amplification of the voice. This "vocal mode" is ESSENTIAL for great singing. It is the most important physical setup that a singer needs to train to develop to become a great singer. Vocal Twang explanations, techniques and training are all provided in The TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing". www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com. WHAT IS VOCAL TWANG?
  9. A GREAT BOOK ON THE ACOUSTICS OF SINGING I just had a great discussion with Ken Bozeman, the author of the book, "Practical Vocal Acoustics - Pedagogic Applications for Teachers & Singers". We talked a lot about how the CT and TA relate to each other and specifically, what they are doing inside of contemporary belt voice. I think I am lot more clear on CT/TA involvement now and "get it". I also have this book guys. It talks a lot about the acoustics of singing, but is practical and not too difficult to follow. It comes with a CD and a web site you can check into with supporting materials. I highly recommend. I'm posting it here since there was a lot of discussion about CT/TA in here and I think Ken's publication needs to be brought to your attention. CHECK IT OUT! CLICK HERE TO GET THE BOOK! http://www.kenbozeman.com
  10. Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/. Visit the world's highest rated vocal training program! One of the problems with “Bel Canto” is that it is a term that a lot of voice teachers use because it sounds interesting. “Bel Canto” sounds serious or, as if it is the ultimate in singing techniques or possesses the secrets of singing from a time long forgotten! Unfortunately, “Bel Canto” has become a “buzz” word that people use to impress students, simply stated. “Bel Canto” just means beautiful singing? It essentially is referring to a style of singing that has a lot of legato in it, that came from a specific region of Italy in the 18th century. Thats it, there is nothing magical about “Bel Canto”, unless you are led to believe that it is something more then what you could get with any other good teacher. Don’t believe me? Here is wikipedia’s definition. Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. So this simple less is, do not be fooled that “Bel Canto” means something “high brow” or a set of techniques that come from the ancient past when people were more wise and magical. The truth is, there has never been a time in the history of voice training where there has been more innovation, understanding and great techniques to help singers then the present. I would much rather be training my voice in the present era, then in the ancient past. For sure! Bel Canto is not a rare, ancient method of singing that supersedes anything that The Four Pillars of Singing is not already offering, or any other great vocal training program. Be careful not to get bamboozled by the “Bel Canto” buzz word hype. https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/
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    VoceVista - Vocal Training Software Turn any computer into one of the most powerful, yet easy to use tools to increase the power and range of your singing voice. VoceVista provides immediate feedback on your singing so you can analyze what you're doing in real time, make changes and see how those changes help you improve dramatically and quickly. The software also lets you save your sessions, or analyze your favorite singers' recordings to see what they're doing. VoceVista & The Science Of Vocal Bridges - Formants In SingingThe VoceVista digital download offering is easy to install and use. In a matter of minutes, your computer will be running the world's only formant tuning software specifically designed for singers. Sing into your computer's internal mic (no need for an expensive recording mic) and you'll see immediate feedback. It's that simple. With more experience, you can start to take advantage of other, more detailed information that the software reveals to help you improve even further. VoceVista - Academically Acclaimed See what teachers and students at hundreds of university music schools around the world have already discovered using VoceVista: that a computer-based feedback mechanism is one of the most effective ways to improve singing technique. Dr. Donald MillerOne of the world's leading vocal formant research scientists"VoceVista gives you powerful visual feedback so you can see the harmonics of your singing. Immediately, you can tune and calibrate your voice to an optimized harmonic color and resonant energy." Note For Apple iOS Users Note: VoceVista currently runs only on the Windows operating system, however, you can run the software on Apple computers running Windows (either in Bootcamp, or using a virtual machine).

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  12. A beautiful performance by voice coach, Jeannie Deva. Jeannie Deva - Whiter Shade of Pale.mp3
  13. A beautiful performance by voice coach, Jeannie Deva. Jeannie Deva - Whiter Shade of Pale.mp3 View full articles
  14. The "Win New Vocal Gear" page is a service we provide to our sponsor companies. TMV World sponsor companies work with TMV World to offer FREE product give-aways for our membership, in exchange to have an opportunity to share with the TMV World membership the benefits of their products and services for singers. TMV World ONLY works with the best companies in the world and in the last 7 years, we have given away hundreds of microphones, vocal pedals, vocal health products, headphones, accessories and services to lucky members of our community. Companies that have participated in the past include; RODE Microphones, TC-Helicon, Electro Harmonics, Singer's Tea, Electro Voice Microphones, Placid Audio Microphones, Heil Microphones, Extreme Isolation Headphones, Audix Microphones, Hercules Mic Stands and more! In the coming weeks we will have our new "Win New Vocal Gear" page set up and ready to go... at that time, we will begin inviting our sponsor companies to share what they have with us. Thank you for your patience as we put the final touches on our new community system and prepare to offer, not only our members, but our sponsor companies the best venue we can.
  15. Hi, TMV-ers! I thought it would be useful today to write a bit about how I approach and talk about vocal technique, in the hope that by putting these ideas out there, you can pick and choose some of them that make sense to you, and that you will hopefully find useful. As a starting point for this, I am inspired to recall an idea I read in Cornelius Reid's book, 'Voice - Psyche and Soma'. I cannot remember the exact quote, but the gist of it is that the mind and the body are acting together to produce the singing voice. I think this means for vocal technique that singing is simultaneously psychological and physical. A survey of books written on singing over the last 200 years shows that every teacher has a different approach to working with singers, a different mix of the psychological and physical. Some favor emphasis of the physical aspects, and talk about doing things with body parts, muscle groups, tendons, nasal cavities, lower jaw, the tongue, etc. Others emphasize the sensations of the singer, i.e., 'sing so that you feel such and such a sensation in such and such location in your body'. Still others rely on metaphors and imagery, i.e., 'sing out the top of your head', or 'imagine that you are projecting the tone toward a target on the wall', or 'think of a happy memory'. I don't do any of these alone. Perhaps better stated, I do them all, cherry-picking ideas and approaches from these authors that have these characteristics: 1) are based on anatomical fact, acoustical principles, and physiologically healthy bodily action. 2) are easily expressed and understood using in common language 3) can be practiced beneficially by the student without the teacher's constant supervision 4) help the singer build their ability to sing what they desire to sing - whatever genre or style that is. When it comes to teaching, I am also an optimist. :-) I believe that most people, with very few exceptions, can learn to sing for their own & others' enjoyment if they approach it with patience. In my next posts, I will be writing about the basics of how the voice works - 'what happens where' in the mind and body to produce healthy vocal tone. Along the way, I will address some common misconceptions I've encountered, and clarify some terms that are often used by singers and teachers, but not well understood. I have no illusions that the way I approach this is the only way, or even the best way. I am very interested to hear other ways of doing it as well, as that is how I learn myself. If you have a particular area you'd like to discuss, send me an e-mail or comment to my blog, and I will pull that text forward in a response. Best Regards, Steve View full articles
  16. I was just saying to a student yesterday (I'm a voice teacher)... I have this friend who is in awe of all these great writers, and is fond of saying things like, "I'll never write like Herman Hesse, or Sylvia Plath. They were so great." And I say, "Yes, they are in your eyes now. But when they were sitting down, writing, they weren't trying to be 'great', or trying to be a 'genius'. They were simply doing what they were driven to do. And I'll bet you they thought what they were doing was crap, and they struggled with doubts just as much as we do." History is full of a legion of writers and artists, etc., who were unappreciated in the time they lived, but were revered afterwards. In our own lifetime, we have amazing writers whose novels were turned down countless times before finally being published and then topping the bestsellers list. I'm a firm disbeliever in the old adage that you 'have to be born with it.' My challenge to anyone who says that is... how do you know if you are born with it, if you don't do the work to find out? And you do that work because it lights you up inside to do that thing. Your passion becomes your motivation to work, and to practice, and to become. Not so you can be seen by the external world to be 'great' or a 'genius', but because you can't imagine your life without that thing you do that makes you feel alive. And you want to get good at it, and through that process of growth & healing you become more than you ever thought possible for you. As you walk your path, struggling with your own doubts and trying to learn what you need to know... you become compassionate about the people who are around you, in front of you, behind you, on the same path... because you realize there is no difference between you and them. Yet each of us is special and unique, and has the potential to achieve almost anything we dream of doing. As we are mentored by our more experienced friends, we pass along our knowledge to those less experienced, and it becomes a chain of support & understanding from our extended family of creative souls. No one is an island. As long as we are born & remain relatively healthy, and have the capacity to listen and learn, then anything is possible. If we are willing to do the work. I see this in my own studio all the time. I work with singers who cannot sing. They are 'tonedeaf'. They cannot sing on key. Even if you offered them a million bucks, they couldn't do it. You'd say, very adamantly, they are not born with it at all, that they should give up and go do something else. Come back a year or two later. And you'd say... 'this can't be the same person.' You'd be amazed at the stunning voice coming from that supposedly tonedeaf person who couldn't sing on key to save their life. As long as you are born with the capacity to learn and perservere, have compassion for yourself & others, and grow your conscious awareness so you can balance strength with humility, you have "it". View full articles
  17. Starting Off This will be a short post, with much more to come later. I am happy to be a part of this group. I will likely be posting quite a bit in the areas of vocal technique and concepts for the younger or beginning singer of whatever age. I like to help folks improve and enjoy their singing more. Feel free to post technique questions to me, and I will do my best to respond in a respectful, thorough and clear way. Steve View full articles
  18. Hi, Everybody.....It's nice to see this new forum even in its early stages having such response as well as the enthusiasm that's being generated. Already I am seeing posts on Breath Support. Listen up everybody. If you are not all over your kids(students) like I am about Breath Support, it's only going to lead to their downfalls and short-comings in many aspects. In the past 6 months, I have seen people lose gigs, blow auditions and turn out really sub-par recordings because of lack of breath support. Mainly, bad intonation that was caused by lack of Breath Support was largely the problem. Now I'm not going to sit here and write a long article on my philosophies because I know that ALL of you have your own way of teaching and monitoring your kids' breath support. I'll be sending numerous articles on this topic soon on this site and other forums that I contribute to. Ironically Breath Support can be abbreviated to BS. But this a not a BULL*#@T story!!! So let's cut the BS and make sure the word gets out on Breath Support. Breath Support is No BS!!! I can't even begin to tell you how many times a day that I have to yell "SUPPORT!!!!" over the loud music in my voice studio while my kids are singing over their tracks because people don't keep Breath Support consistent from the beginning of each phrase to the END of each phrase. The end of the phrase is when Breath Support is the most crucial for airstream as well as keeping the Voice relaxed. So now I'm going to tell my kids this "If you want to be a BS singer or BS performer then don't cut the Breath Support." That's total BS. But then again, look at the person who authored this Blog who more than likely has been called a B*#@SH---TER his entire life.(Even when he was a liitle sh-thead). View full articles
  19. Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman Running Time and Format: 60-minute instructional DVD Distributed by: Hal Leonard Corporation (7777 W. Bluemound Rd. Milwaukee, WI 53213, 800-637-2852, http://www.halleonard.com /) to bookstores, music stores and schools through the world) Release Date: September 30, 2008 Description: World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. In-depth studies while writing her critically acclaimed book. You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher's directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! To Order: see JulieLyonn.com and click on Vocalist's Corner About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman (JulieLyonn.com) has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy, National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores. View full articles
  20. 'Vocal Strength and Power' by Dena Murray Interview Steve: Hi, Dena! I understand that your new book on singing has just been published. Would you tell us a little bit about it? Dena: This is a book that has been 15 years in the making. From the time I started teaching (over 20 years ago,) I knew there was a problem with the prevailing concepts of diaphragmatic support. Singers were injuring themselves from too much pressure and misperceiving instructions. Steve: Do yo mean that the usual "singing teacher's lingo" was not helpful in leading the student in what they should do? Dena: Yes, exactly. They also were not getting what they'd hoped to get from taking lessons i.e., freedom when singing/performing. So after many years of study, I finally uncovered that the problem boiled down to correct intake of air (the inhale) and created exercises to correct it. Steve: You've published two other books on singing. How does this latest one fit in with them? Dena: Well, I never set out to do a three-part series but that was the end result of all my work. Vocal Technique: Finding Your Real Voice is a beginners book and focuses on the vocal mechanism. I did two things deliberately for the beginner: 1) I skipped the discussion of how to use the diaphragm for support, and instead created exercises to builid up the muscles and cartilages which control/support the vocal folds, and, 2) I separated the chest voice from the head voice because in my experience if there are problems in either register, those problems will show up when trying to bridge and combine them for that one-register sound.This book is the first step in how to gain support. Steve: Ok, I am with you so far. How was your approach received by your readers? Dena: Very well, I think. My European readers were especially open with their positive feed-back, and I still receive comments to day on that book's usefulness. Steve: Ok! What was your second book like? Dena: The second one, Advanced Vocal Technique: Middle Voice, Placement & Styles (co-authored by Tita Hutchison,) focuses on a step-by-step process of how to bridge the voice for the one register sound, vowel formation, and correct placement for any given style. Steve: So, that would make it the 'next steps' after clarifying the Chest and Head voices, and some discussion of the different vocal productions. Dena: Yes, that's right. There are 13 exercises in this book with every feeling and sensation one should (and shouldn't) have, literally spelled out for the singer. Again, we purposely stayed away from too much focus on the diaphragm. This book is the second step with regard to support. Steve: All right. How does this third book extend the approach of the other two? Dena: In this third and last book of the series, Vocal Strength and Power, the focus is solely on how to employ correct use of the diaphragmatic region for its support of the entire mechanism. Steve: How is your approach different from other's you've heard? Dena: Simply stated, I've uncovered a problem inherent with other approaches to 'support' instruction, and created exercises to correct the problem. Steve: Ok, I'll bite. What is the problem? Dena: The problem is the correct intake of air before singing. Steve: Who can benefit from your approach and exercises? Dena: Anyone should be able to add these exercises (if they should so choose) to already working methods of techniques when they notice they are struggling for not just the freedom, but also their inherent great sound. Steve: Dena, what else does the book contain? Dena: In addition to the CD of exercises, this book also includes a glossary of dictionary-definition. View full articles
  21. Grooming Your Voice For Success By Julie Lyonn Lieberman It's easy to build vocal habits when you sing a song over and over again. These habits can be useful to free us to focus on performance values; but all too often, we lock in tightness and inferior function, thereby creating a struggle during performance or even hoarseness, a sore throat, and the like. No matter how good you sound, how music business savvy you are, and how hard you've worked on your material and its presentation, if you don't cultivate a ritual around how you care for your voice, you stand to compromise your future and potentially your level of success. Pro-athletes work with their muscles intelligently. They understand that if they don't warm up, respect the properties of muscle and joint function, and warm down, they may be beleaguered with aches and pains or injuries that thwart the level of success they are able to achieve. Taking responsibility represents potential longevity as well as quality of experience. Most singers already know that warm-ups are important, but they may not understand why it's essential to vocalize regularly before singing their actual material. Let's use our postural muscles as a metaphor. Let's say you spend 10 hours a day hunched over. The muscles will gradually adapt and freeze you into that posture if you don't stretch and strengthen your body to counterbalance repetitive motion. Your sound is influenced by a combination of genetics; family and geographic influences on pronunciation/articulation; and the influence of your emotional/psychological gestalt on the use of your vocal anatomy. All of these factors culminate to create habitual muscular response. This, in turn, can embed and strengthen patterns that mobilize the tongue, lips, breath, and what I call the cathedral the interior musculature of the mouth and throat. Vocal exercises aerobicize, stretch and strengthen these muscle groups so that they remain balanced. Through this process, you can refine and detail mind-to-body response so that each sound you hear, each emotion you experience, and every thought you intend to communicate to your audience is received by this flexible work station and translated into a palette of color and texture. Here is the ironic twist: we are least conscious of how we sing each time we learn a new song because our attention is focused almost entirely on learning the melody and words. Yet, this is when we tend to sing the song the most in order to learn it. If it's an original piece, this is also when we are also the most emotional because the lyrics are intimately connected to and motivated by current life experiences. Some singers, when they are imbued with feeling, tighten the throat or body to express emotion as it wells up. Muscularly speaking, the brain can't differentiate between the activity, singing that specific song, and how we are carrying out the activity. The brain takes all of that information, and locks it together into a sensory engram (which I like to call a barcode.) From that moment forward, we tend to perform the song exactly as we rehearsed it. Here are some simple procedures you can institute to improve your practice habits: 1) Warm up before singing lyrics: Assess your voice each day and choose exercises that stimulate desired response from breath support, lip action, tongue behavior, and the tone you produce. This is detailed on my DVD, Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today Singer (see JulieLyonn.com > Vocalist's Corner for details). 2) When learning a new song, sing the melody on the vowel that's most comfortable for you first; then use the actual vowels of the words but without the consonants. 3) To prevent any habitual muscular associations, speak the lyrics to learn them, but use varying accents from around the world or country; become an actor or actress and delivery the lyrics using different personalities, pitch settings, and emotional contexts to avoid inadvertently embedding negative muscular habits. Examples: become a British school teacher become a sea nymph speak wistfully, then angrily, then lovingly use your low range and then your high range vary volume as you speak vary pitch as you speak 4) Join the lyrics and melody together, singing softly without emotion; then try singing the song in various keys as well as with variations in volume. You can apply the personalities you've rehearsed to the sung version as well. 5) Now sing emotionally. Notice what happens to you physically when you become more expressive. If you discover tension mounting in areas of your body, try varying how you express emotion by using imagery: I will pour my anger out the bottom of my feet like a pitcher with a leak. I will inhale and exhale on between each sentence as if I'm filling the sails of a sailboat with my breath and emulate that image when I sing each sentence of the song. I will sing the song with the opposite emotion the lyrics require (emotion is energy and when we pour anger into a love song, it doesn't necessarily read as anger it can read as heightened passion!) There is a popular quote, sometimes attributed to Albert Einstein, and other times to Benjamin Franklin or Rita Mae Brown, that goes something like, Insanity is doing the same thing the same way over and over again and expecting different results. The above practice procedures will give you an opportunity to step out of old practice habits and thereby gain new results. Vocal Aerobics: Essentials for Today's Singers with Julie Lyonn Lieberman 60-minute instructional DVD distributed by Hal Leonard World-renowned music educator, Julie Lyonn Lieberman, has created an instructional DVD for singers. Her practice system focuses on cognitive illumination and muscular facility. This system can help develop a vibrating palette that communicates spirit, emotion, and viewpoint all riding effortlessly on the breath. It is supported by science yet connected to individuality. By first guiding the exercises in silence, her intent is to prevent the tension and misuse that often occur when the main impetus for the creation of musical sound is fueled by a brew of yearning and fear mixed with a fixation on the end product. Topics covered include: Section I Introduction, Creating a Cathedral, Breath Anatomy Section II Aerobicizing the Tongue, Mobilizing the Lips Section III Balancing the non-dominant side of the mouth, Posture, The Power of Imagery, Warming Up and Warming Down, Vocal Health Ms. Lieberman trusts the innate intelligence of the client by making sure that they understand how and why each region of their vocal anatomy works the way it does. Through extensive experience teaching, she has developed ergonomically based exercises that are fulcrum triggers: they get the job done more efficiently and faster. Lieberman has discovered that when the lights are turned on and the equipment is illuminated, epiphanies abound and can continue to be generated by the singer, long after the teacher leaves the room. Her in-depth studies while creating her critically acclaimed book You Are Your Instrument, followed by her three spin-off DVDs (The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, The Instrumentalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship, and The Violin in Motion) place a unique spin on this body of work. Most voice teachers use exercises that are effective in the long run or they would be put out of business, but the older model for mentorship entailed a do as I do and do as I say approach. It was a faith-based relationship; the student was expected to blindly follow the teacher’s directions without specifics, context, or adequate rapport with the musculature required to do the job smoothly and consciously. The belief behind that style of work was that if you repeated each exercise enough times (often while inadvertently thinking about something else), that it would help you sing better. This is the long, slow train to success. Julie believes that it's time to replace unconscious repetition with less activity, more awareness, and targeted control. She will help you convert the butcher's knife into a laser beam! About the author Julie Lyonn Lieberman has specialized in working with creative vocalists in her NYC music studio over the last 3 decades. Her students have included artists such as Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton, Grammy-nominated Putnam Murdock, Indie music award winner Kara Suzanne (best new folk-singer/songwriter album of the year), and critically acclaimed lyricist Julie Flanders, to name a few. Ms. Lieberman is an improvising violinist/singer, composer, recording artist, journalist, educator, and the author of nine books and six instructional DVDs. A dynamic, participatory workshop leader, her ability to stimulate participants to think and grow in new ways has earned respect for her work throughout the world. In addition to currently teaching improvisation at Juilliard, she has presented for organizations like Music Educators Association, International Association of Jazz Educators, the Juilliard MAP Program, Carnegie/Weill Hall/Juilliard's The Academy,National Young Audiences, and the Carnegie Hall LinkUp. Lieberman is a J. D'Addario Elite Clinician. Alfred Publishing publishes her scores. To Order: This DVD is distributed by Hal Leonard through your local music, book store, and amazon.com for $23.95 or SPECIAL PRICE FOR MEMBERS OF THE MODERN VOCALIST Purchase through Paypal at The Vocalist's Corner on julielyonn.com or Send a check to Julie Lyonn Music, P.O. Box 268, Worthington, MA 01098 $21.95 + $5.00 shipping in the U.S.Add $5 outside the U.S. View full articles
  22. After all the learning and technique the most difficult thing for most singers and the most important, is to get yourself the hell out of the way. The voice has a mind and heart of it's own. You will have to feed it, water it ,teach it and raise it like a child. Provided you've done that well now it is time to leave it be. I assure you, your voice does not want an overbaring mother or father hanging over it , neither following it around on it's dates. Once it's all grown up it needs to hanky panky without being disturbed and it will produce many wonderful children of it's own. Your job is the preparation do that part fully and with all your heart, mind ,soul and devotion. Then just let it be!
  23. One must remember singing is as much about your habits between vocalizing as during. I've seen many so called pro who do nothing all week and then want to know why it doesn't work right on friday night when they hit the stage. 1. You should stretch your tongue several times a day, your throat as well 2. You should re-place and re-focus your voice and placement continuosly throughout the day 3. You should speak in different registers ,tonalities and placements throughout the day to maintain agility 4. you should breath fully and deeply (retain control of your breathing) at all times These things will also help your speaking voice and prevent muscles from constricting between vocalizing.
  24. One must remember singing is as much about your habits between vocalizing as during. I've seen many so called pro who do nothing all week and then want to know why it doesn't work right on friday night when they hit the stage. 1. You should stretch your tongue several times a day, your throat as well 2. You should re-place and re-focus your voice and placement continuosly throughout the day 3. You should speak in different registers ,tonalities and placements throughout the day to maintain agility 4. you should breath fully and deeply (retain control of your breathing) at all times These things will also help your speaking voice and prevent muscles from constricting between vocalizing. View full articles