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Found 61 results

  1. Hi guys I'm kind of a beginner so please bare with me, and sorry if something like this has been answered elsewhere before. One of the things that really makes certain belts stand out to me is that 'ringing' quality. Not necessarily a overly cutting sound, but a nice round 'pingy' ringing sound. An example of such a belt is below (3.10-3.40, the first 'OOOOH', then 'BLIND', then 'YOUR', 'TRY TRY and TRY' - the whole climax sounds super nice but especially these notes). There are dozens of other examples but I always loved this especially. But my main question is, what is this? Is this twang? What is it EXACTLY that achieves such a round 'ringing' on notes? And HOW?
  2. Unfortunately not too many people are familiar Steve Walsh, probably because Kansas songs aren't as well known. So I wanted to start a thread to analyze his vocals. This was the song that started it all. Had to imagine that I might have never known about Steve Walsh if a classmate hadn't decided to play it. This was the first time I heard the song and that was in the post 2000s era! I didn't know anything about vocal technique back then but actually it was the lead singer's voice that captivated my attention instead of the iconic guitar riff. Below are the moments that stuck out to me the most the very first time I heard this song: 3:49 - 3:53 "Nothing equals the splendor" Very strong EE and on a C5 too! Still don't know how he does that. 3:46 - 4:00 "Surely heaven waits for you" This time an excellent OO from "you" on a B4. Pretty remarkable that it's a closed vowel at that high of an intensity! 4:13 - 4:21 "No mooooreee!" Another high intensity moment on a B4; this has got to require good breath management and efficiency Alright, here's one more: 6:48 - 7:28 OK this is pretty incredible. More than half a minute of beastly endurance! Vowels sound like OH-AH-UH to me, but I might be completely wrong.
  3. ok, so some life drama has sidetracked me for the last 2 months....so I am trying to pick back up where I left off my "training" 2 questions 1) Belting vs bridging. I guess my question is this.....at any one time a singer can only be doing ONE of these...yes? for example. Lets say a guy starts to feel his passagio around e4 at an average intensity level etc. Now, if he wants to bridge up into higher notes then he goes ahead and starts to bridge at that point...yes? BUT, if he wants to BELT on up to f4 or g4 etc then he will use more support etc and stay in chest voice and "belt" up to f4-g4...correct? So here is the question.....once he starts his belt technique he CANT then bridge, can he?? say he did belt up to g4....he is pretty much stuck there yes? he cant THEN bridge higher can he?? He has gotten the mechanisms into the wrong configuration, yes? (perhaps a mega skilled singer has tons of flexibility in these areas, but I am talking a guy with a decent basic skill level) 2) So that leads to the 2nd question. for a relative unskilled newb, whats the best way to train? a) spend more time building the belt skills/chest voice. start working on bridging right away? c) combine the 2 approaches any ideas? thanks
  4. Robert Lunte - "Nocturne" I love this song, I hope you do too... Some of you have heard this. This is the Final production. Special thanks to my team Zack Uidl, Jason Shavey and Clay Copeland.
  5. What do you all think of Beyonce as a vocalist? She seems to have excellent control over her instrument. My only gripe is the clavicular breathing with the audible inhalation. Here are a few good videos of singing for you all to analyze: What do you all think?
  6. This song is darn good. Addicted to the song since the first listen. I can sing in that range but I get louder on the top notes. It doesn't hurt but I have this weird abdominal pressure that feels like I'm pushing air with my abdomen and my vocal cords are resisting the air pressure. Is that belting? Would it harm me?
  7. Ok this is the time of my life where I'm really really vocally frustated.. Started off 4 years ago with Brett Manning's stuff brought MM, SS, MV, etc. I've improved a lot but not as much as I'd like. I want a consistent working vocal range from E4-C5 and then I'd focus on other stuff. I can already hit those notes but I've to put much effort and when I sing with a little less effort, I sound like whining. I'm thinking about moving to Ken Tamplin's stuff. I've already brought his program too (all 3 volumes) but he looks like he's straining and his notes sound extremely heavy. I do not want that. I'm an engineering student and belong to a broke family. I cannot afford a vocal coach or any other program for now or atleast for 4-5 years until I get a job. What are the vocal techniques of these guys? They're notes sound so full yet effortless. I can do that but it sounds like crying and takes much effort. G#4-A#4 at the starting. This guy slays the notes at the end (F#4-G4). The most difficult notes for me. Any help would be extremely appreciated. This guy is currently at the pinnacle in India.
  8. Hello. I joined a choir, so my interest is in developing my head voice, which was totally abandoned (I was in a choir as a child). I saw Felipe's video on low notes and realized I was singing too often in my high notes now, so started singing some in my low notes but in Head Voice. But do you think it would also be good for me to sing some in strong chest voice? My throat was totally underused until I started now in the choir. I hope I was able to make the question clear. Tell me if I didn't.
  9. Robert Lunte, "Timeless Chains". A song about my "x" Anna Christina. Enjoy. Silently your, beauty took my breath away... Now comes the rain, can I feel another day. So much time has past away from that fateful day. So much time has passed, since you turned away. Chorus Now timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me. Berlin skies of gray, so cold I cannot breath Cause I lost, mean Frau in the storm, that marked my destiny! But here I stand defiantly mending a heart ripped to shreds of tragedy But my face to the wind, Im washed from my sins, but you still keeps haunting me Chorus Timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me So much time has past away from that fateful day. So much time has passed since you turned away. Chorus Timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me!
  10. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  11. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom View full articles
  12. To give some background singing info: I am 18, My range is G2-G4 consistently in chest and F3-F5 in head voice. I sing mostly musical theater and Operetta sometimes. My first and second passagio areas are C#4 and F#4. I currently just started taking Musical theater voice with a teacher who specializes in Manuel Garcia Technique (A form of bel-canto) Although I have a lot of singing experience already!-Vocal Fach/Type? I know I am a young singer to try and 'identify" my voice, but I think I might be a tenor? so I'm a little confused... I have a strong low G2-C3 lower register, however, my first and second passagio areas are C#4 and F#4 which are the passagio areas for a dramatic tenor or a robust tenor(Also known as the bari-tenor). I always thought I was a baritone, but I have noticed the ease I have singing in my higher register above my first passagio (C4-F4). I think i may just have a problem singing through my second passagio, because in lessons I have been able to sing up to Bflat4 in a well-supported chest voice. Has anyone dealt with this or have any advice? My ultimate goal (because I sing MT) is to be able to sustain notes and belt from A4-B4. This brings me to my second question...-Singing through the second passagio? I can sing through the first passagio with ease, but I always have trouble once I get up to F#4. My teacher has helped me sing past it up to Bflat4 (I am still new to formal lessons) but I have trouble on my own. Any advice?Thank you!
  13. Heres a new Video that might help clear up some questions..
  14. Some of you guys have seen earlier preproduction of this tune. Here is the final presentation to you all... hope you enjoy. The Song is a bit about... the morning after. That feeling you get when you did something the previous evening or have been doing something that is fun, but now you have to pay the consequences in the heart. Then freeing yourself from it...
  15. Hi. I am able to "hit"(Since Rob hates the word "hit", you can also say reach) A4 fairly consistently and easily. But I am not in a position to hold this note steadily without breaking. I would like to get the ability to hold this note, and gradually increase this to Bb4 and eventually B4. How should I approach this? Should I do belting training? I think I am in mixed resonance in these notes. So if I develop the ability to hold until B4, will it automatically enable me to transition into these notes easier than I am doing now. For the style of singing that I want to sing, I would like to be able to sing as effortlessly as possible upto B4... I think people on this forum have commented on my voice sounding like a tenor. IS this possible and realistic for me to have a goal like this?
  16. Hi! For the ones that are new to my name, I am Francis. 15 years of age. i like singing classical, rnb and opera. Maybe some rock too. It's been a long time since I last posted and I was like a newbie way back then. And I am coming back with a song of G. Puccini popularized by Luciano Pavarotti. This is Nessun Dorma. http://picosong.com/Sbbw I had a break somewhere at "Il nome mio nessun sapra" and I really want to ask about that. First, about what the title says. What resonation am I using? Is it chest, head, or mixing? WARNING: The very first part of the clip where I was speaking is very soft. The singing part is VERY loud. So, I recommend turning down the volume for the part after "Here it goes". And, is this proper or not? Do I need to address something first before continuing and finishing the song? All replies will be appreciated. Thanks in advance! -Slash
  17. They both strike me as lyric voice types trying to fatten their tone in the belting parts. It sounds like they are singing within their mouths or something. Please discuss, and those of you who are knowledgeable, please explain. they both have this totally smooth and powerful belting tone
  18. Hello everyone! News has come out and been covered all over the internet about how Nickelback have had to cancel the rest of their North American tour because of a cyst on singer Chad Kroeger's vocal folds, which he is having surgically removed. If any of you viewed my last thread on vocal fry, I made it clear that I was a huge fan of the band Nickelback and in particular the man himself, Chad Kroeger. I wasn't going to create this thread because I thought some of you might have had enough of me going on about vocal fry and Chad in the other thread, but i'm interested and it is about vocal health so I thought why not? Here is a quote from the official website: So how do you guys think this cyst appeared? Nickelback have toured for many years and Chad has been fine in the past. Why has this happened now? Is he pushing too hard? Singing too much? Not taking enough care of his voice? He turned 40 last year and whilst I don't see that age as old, maybe that has something to do with it? Getting older.. not warming up and cooling down maybe? I also know that the whole of Nickelback have a few beers on stage most nights when touring, but I don't think they go overboard. Drinking after the show though... I can imagine Chad and the guys drinking a bit. I also saw an interview with them recently where Chad was hungover and you could really tell in his voice. I understand that singing nearly every night might be a challenge but I don't understand how he's done it for years and been fine as far as I know. I'd love to know your opinions on Chad's vocal problem itself or just vocal health and how we can go about not falling into similar problems. One last thing... I'm seeing Nickelback live in November so hopefully Chad makes a full recovery in time. They haven't cancelled the rest of their tour... yet. I know that if I had an operation on my vocal folds and stopped singing for weeks, I'd notice a difference in my singing for sure! Hell.. I can notice a difference if I skip a few days working my voice out!
  19. Recently I've been breaking a lot from chest to head (specifically falsetto), as I'm trying to extend "chest" more (I'm already working on support, placement, formants, etc.. not to break). I'd like to know if breaks are harmful to the vocal folds. If yes, why?
  20. So, I've been browsing youtube and found this amazing singer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ns4S57wXxI He was actually a policeman from the Philippines. However, I find his vocals really special and trained. Can this set of singing skills be achieved through years of singing? Or it needs some kind of training? He is likely a tenor to me. He had this sweet, soft sound mixed with a very nice vibrato. Going back to the question, is there a term for what he did at the last line? The high, belted? note. Specifically, the "how 'MUCH' I love you" part. The very last part, the ending. I think it was a kind of a shift from chesty mix, to a head tone. Is that really it? And what do you use to call it? How is it achieved? Or is it just a "diminuendo"? Confused right now, tbh. Haha Thanks for the replies!
  21. So I'm experiencing this new(ish) thing... I've been doing a lot of sirens and oohs and EEs up from my chest to my head voice and back down. I tell ya, if I ever have to sing a song where the only words are "You Fool Me", I will be styling! While I wait for that song to turn up - I've noticed where I USED to be able to kind of squeeze and push (right around A) things in my throat COMPLETELY shut off and it will no longer work. I can no longer PUSH THROUGH or Muscle Through stuff. Don't get me wrong, I don't wanna be a pushy (read that last word carefully kids!) singer, but there have been times when I've been in the middle of a gig and had to push to make it through. In fact there are a few songs where I need a bit of muscle like that behind it in spots. Not to hit the note, but to get the effect the original singer has. What I'm finding is that if I lighten up my air and don't push, I make it with minimal effort, but it's a different and not tight voice (good). However, it's not a big voice (bad). Just to reiterate- I don't want to have to push to get notes, however, there are times where that tightness is good for affect and can help as long as you don't ride that all night. AND I'd also think that by doing things with the head voice that it wouldn't mess up my upper chest voice. It's like my head voice is saying "DOOD, you need to go easy here... ooh! it's saying "You (Can't) Fool Me" - damn, so close to my hit song.... So my question to you all is - after you've worked and worked on your head transition and sirens, etc. do you notice that you cannot push any longer in your transitional area without basically shutting things off? Basically, that you can't take your chest up to that part of your range without it giving you issues and kind of shutting you down.
  22. I was thinking of this and I'd love to hear your opinions, especially from the voice teachers. Let's say a singer tried an experiment. He committed to practicing every day where he has to run the voice up his range and he had to avoid any kind of bridging, no letting go into falsetto, no transitioning...nothing... just had to run the full voice up all through just sheer will and determination. So any scale, any siren any voice exercise had to be done in full voice. No use of any heady placement, just pull up chest higher and higher..... I wonder,,,,,Would the voice eventually find it's way all the up the range? Would you and your voice figure out the way up through the "passaggio" and above? Would the development in this way open up the voice and allow it to release? I mean it's not like anyone's thinking of this or trying it, but I just wonder what the voice might end up doing in terms of capability and development. We always teach and read how the chest voice ends and now you have to nowhere to go......how you get stuck....or how you need to transition....... Historically speaking, did the teachers or singers of years gone by ever explore this? So let's say you just chest pulled for a few months, where would the voice end up? Would it be damaged? Would it be unbalanced? Who's to say...... (And yes.....I'm a little crazy I guess..lol)
  23. The vocals on this entire album are mind blowing!!!   Listen To This!     Freddy Curci         Freddy Curci on Wikipedia