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Found 86 results

  1. Robert Lunte - "Nocturne" I love this song, I hope you do too... Some of you have heard this. This is the Final production. Special thanks to my team Zack Uidl, Jason Shavey and Clay Copeland.
  2. At minute 3 Felipe starts talking of Registration, and he says "Registration is easy to find if you try to Yodel". He makes it look easy, but I can't yodel! Can you? I don't think yodeling is easy, but I've noticed people talking about it as if it was. This might be related to "flipping", which I understand as your voice naturally/automatically changing registers without your conscious intention. Is that normal for you??? It's not for me and I can't remember it ever was.
  3. Hey guys! I'm a guy, and have always had random access to which seems like the whistle register - although it seems like an extension of my falsetto and I never count it as my usual range. It comes and goes, more often not there, and usually airy and disconnected from the rest of my voice. But the WEIRDEST thing happened - I let out a yawn and made a noise. I went from the bottom of my range, up to my head voice (which stops at about E5), and went into a fully connected whistle register. I was hitting up to an E6 VERY clearly, completely connected to the rest of my voice. I was gliding up and down (to my lowest note - A2) with complete ease, and it felt and sounded more like a part of my head voice as opposed to an airy, difficult to produced falsetto. This has never happened to me before, so I found it pretty exciting I could easily get completely connected heady sounding note all the way up there. But alas, it just kinda stopped and I wish I recorded it for you guys to decipher what was going on! I was wondering if any other guys (or girls) have any experience of something like this happening. Are there any ways of nurturing this? Tried to do some lip rolls up there but now I can't access it as easily
  4. Ok, maybe a dumb question. The whole bridging/passaggio/belting thing. It gets confusing because we read that the male passaggio is typically starting somewhere around d4-f4. Ok, fair enough. Yet then we read that so and so likes to "belt"a b4 or c5. So if he can "belt" a b4 then how is his passaggio down somewhere around d4-f4? As a person becomes more trained does this all become a matter of semantics and/or shades of gray? for instance that same singer could probably hit a b4 in chest, or "mixed", or pure head voice, correct? And nevermind those 3 pictureword terms, he could probably hit NUMEROUS different shadings and versions of that same b4...correct? I think its just the term "bridging" that throws me. The term itself implies some sort of "digital" either/or thing when its really not that way. The term "bridge" make you think someone has done a trick or something lol. But if a guy sings a phrase from chest voice up to, say, a4-b4...its not going to stand out like "omg, he bridged!"...correct? Obviously a trained singer isnt going to all of a sudden hit one specific note and his while vocal character change So the term "bridging"...does it really almost apply more to sirens that to singing actual phrases? Any good examples out there of guys singing phrases where they obviously bridged within the phrase? Obviously there are plenty of examples where guys belt B4-c5ish stuff in pure chest. Its like there are SO many examples of belts around b4 that it makes it hard to understand the passaggio being said to be around d4-f4ish
  5. Ok this is the time of my life where I'm really really vocally frustated.. Started off 4 years ago with Brett Manning's stuff brought MM, SS, MV, etc. I've improved a lot but not as much as I'd like. I want a consistent working vocal range from E4-C5 and then I'd focus on other stuff. I can already hit those notes but I've to put much effort and when I sing with a little less effort, I sound like whining. I'm thinking about moving to Ken Tamplin's stuff. I've already brought his program too (all 3 volumes) but he looks like he's straining and his notes sound extremely heavy. I do not want that. I'm an engineering student and belong to a broke family. I cannot afford a vocal coach or any other program for now or atleast for 4-5 years until I get a job. What are the vocal techniques of these guys? They're notes sound so full yet effortless. I can do that but it sounds like crying and takes much effort. G#4-A#4 at the starting. This guy slays the notes at the end (F#4-G4). The most difficult notes for me. Any help would be extremely appreciated. This guy is currently at the pinnacle in India.
  6. I would like to add some songs to my daily vocal practice, but most of the songs I like invove belting long phrases around A4-C5. I wanted to avoid frustration, so I came here to ask you: What are some good rock songs for beginners to practice? Thank you.
  7. Interestingly enough, I got into a discussion about false cord function with David L. Jones of www.voiceteacher.com about this "false cord function" and have been mind boggled about the concept. I was told that it is often used in metal and rock music to pitch "death growls" and "death screams," and parson my terminology if those are incorrect. I admittedly know nothing about rock music or metal, nor would I ever claim to. That said, knowing that there are several rock aficionados here, I was curious if anyone is familiar with this false cord function and just exactly how it operates?
  8. Robert Lunte, "Timeless Chains". A song about my "x" Anna Christina. Enjoy. Silently your, beauty took my breath away... Now comes the rain, can I feel another day. So much time has past away from that fateful day. So much time has passed, since you turned away. Chorus Now timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me. Berlin skies of gray, so cold I cannot breath Cause I lost, mean Frau in the storm, that marked my destiny! But here I stand defiantly mending a heart ripped to shreds of tragedy But my face to the wind, Im washed from my sins, but you still keeps haunting me Chorus Timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me So much time has past away from that fateful day. So much time has passed since you turned away. Chorus Timeless chains, there's no escape! You walked Away Just when I started to get my life back under me!
  9. Hello everyone! I started getting interested in singing a couple months ago, but I am struggling a lot to sing most of the rock songs that I like. I have done my fair share of research about chest, head and mixed voice, which led me to believe that I am a baritone. The very lowest note I can sing is F2, and I can usually drag my chest voice up until G4. that means I usually experience a "crack" on Ab4. Therefore I can't sing 99% of songs unless I overcome that problem. I found out that you can learn and develop the ability to sing in the passagio zone and to connect all the registers, by doing vocal exercises. I recently downloaded an app which has about 5 scales for you to sing along. But I really don't know how much time per day I should spend doing that. Also, should I allow my voice to go into head voice, or should I push my chest voice higher until it cracks? I know this may seem dumb for some people, but I have just gotten started. Thank you!
  10. Hello, I was wondering if I could get some advice about what range I should be singing in and how to tell which register I'm in. I'm a 27 year old woman; I've been singing my whole life (mostly in private, occasional church choir and school talent show) but recently began to pay more attention to technical aspects. I've done some online reading about techniques like opening the throat, lowering the larynx, and how to switch into head voice, things like that, but I'm still confused about what that actually feels like. I plan to take a few professional lessons when I'm at a point where I can afford it.Using a pitch monitoring app, I found that my natural comfortable speaking pitch is from B3-E4, average C4. Right now I can comfortably sing A3-C5 with extremes at F3 and D5. My best sound is probably F4-B4. I have a light, sweet-sounding, almost childlike quality to my voice, with a similar tone to Jodi Benson as the Little Mermaid. I can easily sing the song Part of Your World in her range, but have trouble going higher than that. I'm not sure how to develop my registers. I recently figured out how to produce bell-like ringing tones with a slight operatic quality while feeling the roof of my mouth vibrate (in the range of F#4 to C5), which I feel like is head voice and is different in quality than when I'm feeling vibrations in my lower throat near my chest. I can sing up to A4, sometimes B4 in what feels like the chest register and the same tonal quality as my lower notes. I only recently began to be able to sing B4-D5 in "head voice" without straining or airiness. I would love to increase my range but I'm not sure whether to focus more on developing the lower or upper range. I've read that even contralto voices are expected to be able to reach D5 or F5 but I have trouble with those notes, and I have nowhere near the vocal weight of Adele for example. I can sing Taylor Swift's usual range fairly well but I have a lighter tone to my voice than she does. I have mostly thought I was more of an alto range singer because of my difficulty with high notes, but I also struggle with having any resonance below A3 to B3. I have also recently paid more attention to diaphragm breathing and I'm improving my breath control. I would greatly appreciate any thoughts about what range I should focus on, and how to develop my head voice and mixed voice. Thank you!
  11. I'm a male who has been singing in falsetto almost their whole life. Of course I do sing in chest but I find singing in falsetto more comfortable. So today I was practising and I suddenly had this idea to try singing Emotions by Mariah Carey, so I listened to the song several times to get to understand it better and I was really intrigued with the Whistling parts of the song. So instead of trying to sing then song, I tried finding my whistle register but I was only singing in falsetto the whole time, until I breathed out in between singing and I made a squeak. So I tried focusing on the feeling and I was able tooit very high notes, higher than I thought I could hit. I was concerned whether it was just a really high falsetto but it felt slightly different than a falsetto, instead of feeling the sound coming out from my throat, I could feel vibrations in my head and the sound seemed to be coming from in between the back of my nose and mouth. I was pretty happy with the sound of it so I this time I actually tried singing the song, it sounded okay until I reached the whistling before then chorus and instead of the smooth high sound coming out, a weird falsetto came out instead. After that I went and read about the whistle register and I came upon one where the author of the page talked about how whistling with the wrong technique will damage your voice. I was instantly worried so I came here looking for tips on singing with the whistle register. How do I know I'm actually singing in my whistle register and how to incorporate it into my singing. Thanks im advance !
  12. To give some background singing info: I am 18, My range is G2-G4 consistently in chest and F3-F5 in head voice. I sing mostly musical theater and Operetta sometimes. My first and second passagio areas are C#4 and F#4. I currently just started taking Musical theater voice with a teacher who specializes in Manuel Garcia Technique (A form of bel-canto) Although I have a lot of singing experience already!-Vocal Fach/Type? I know I am a young singer to try and 'identify" my voice, but I think I might be a tenor? so I'm a little confused... I have a strong low G2-C3 lower register, however, my first and second passagio areas are C#4 and F#4 which are the passagio areas for a dramatic tenor or a robust tenor(Also known as the bari-tenor). I always thought I was a baritone, but I have noticed the ease I have singing in my higher register above my first passagio (C4-F4). I think i may just have a problem singing through my second passagio, because in lessons I have been able to sing up to Bflat4 in a well-supported chest voice. Has anyone dealt with this or have any advice? My ultimate goal (because I sing MT) is to be able to sustain notes and belt from A4-B4. This brings me to my second question...-Singing through the second passagio? I can sing through the first passagio with ease, but I always have trouble once I get up to F#4. My teacher has helped me sing past it up to Bflat4 (I am still new to formal lessons) but I have trouble on my own. Any advice?Thank you!
  13. Heres a new Video that might help clear up some questions..
  14. My voice teacher has been telling me that head voice is full voice. We have been working on bridging from chest voice into head voice with no noticeable break and using middle voice to get their. Middle voice acts as a gateway to allow you to switch into head voice without it being so abrupt that head voice sounds like a completely different voice My first question is: is head voice with a connection to chest voice full voice? Meaning it is a light and falsetto like sound without the connection and with the connection it sounds as full as chest voice, meaning you switch into head voice so seamlessly that it creates an auditory illusion to the listener that you are still in chest voice? So above middle voice, it still sounds like the same voice as chest voice, not a light disconnected sound? My second question: what is the difference between singing in a connected head voice and singing in a mix voice? I used to think that head voice was just a light disconnected sound for effect or for female opera singers. My third question: do male opera singers use mixed voice or head voice? Thanks!
  15. Hi everyone. Lately I've been going out for a run and instead of working my voice out at home with next door neighbors getting annoyed at me, I've been singing in the countryside. I find a quiet spot in the grass after a run and I can just let loose instead of worrying about people hearing me and annoying people. Something that I've noticed is after running for about 20-30 minutes, everything is much easier! Bridging and connecting, not straining, sustaining notes.. it's a whole lot easier. I'm guessing this is to do with the breath from the running. Whilst running i'm taking big breaths in and out. It's great! My voice feels a whole lot better after a run instead of spending minutes doing breathing exercises at home stood still. I also workout my voice when running back too. Each time one of my feet hit the ground, I let sounds out like "Yah", "Hee", "Muh", "Ma", "Hey" and it feels totally fine and released. It's like my voice is going where it wants to go naturally instead of me overthinking things and ending up straining. I just thought I'd mention it. Maybe it will help someone!
  16. Hi everyone. Hope you're well. Something that I've noticed when I do scales is that if I begin the note with a 'H', I seem to be able to go through the scale a lot easier and easily transition from Chest to Head without strain. The natural way. This works not only on vowels but also on Hums, which it should if you're phonating from the correct place. I keep the hum continuous throughout the scale with adding a 'H' at the beginning of each note in the scales and it does help.
  17. I have always been envious of singers who have this magical "Once voice" quality in their singing. I am sure that there are many excellent singers in this forum who have that quality. I want to hear from you about your journey, how long it took and what is the one most important thing you would recommend to a rookie in this quest for holy grail!
  18. Hi everyone, so I was wondering how you guys got the hang of vocal cord closure, since my singing teacher always just goes "play around with it" and most the time I end up narrowing my AES, realize that, and then try again from the start. I know I can do it because she did this thing where she tells me to close my eyes, think of something silly or something that makes me want to laugh and then sing like that, and it worked, but it doesn't always work. It's frustrating because I can do the other things she teaches, but I can't seem to do that and it's integral to vocal health to be able to get rid of breathiness. I think it may have something to do with the fact that she groups the closure with retraction of the false vocal cords, as taught by the Estill training program. Any help? Also, I have this weird break high up in my falsetto, and some people say it leads up to the whistle register, but when I sing above it, the sound that comes out is definitely sharper and louder, but not the same as sounds produced in the whistle register. Anybody have the same thing?
  19. Robert always says that the hardest notes to sing are in the first bridge (e4 g4). While I do think they are hard to sing I have always had more trouble with my second bridge (a4 c5) sometimes I feel like I have it down but it always reverts back to an uncontrolled yell. I can bridge effectively below my second bridge and can do the extreme high stuff pretty well. But when I sing note between a4 to c5 especially c5 I lose the heady feeling and start to choke. Once I reach c#5 the headiness comes back in and I can then sing the g5s and a5s. with ease. Have any of you had the same experience with the 2nd bridge or is it just me? Also when I do sing a note in the second bridge that's not yelled it has to much twang and that wind and relese onset with downward pressure just makes me clench my throat. btw. It dosent sound terribly bad live or on recordings.... but I can sure feel it.
  20. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio. View full articles
  21. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio.
  22. Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/. Visit the world's highest rated vocal training program! One of the problems with “Bel Canto” is that it is a term that a lot of voice teachers use because it sounds interesting. “Bel Canto” sounds serious or, as if it is the ultimate in singing techniques or possesses the secrets of singing from a time long forgotten! Unfortunately, “Bel Canto” has become a “buzz” word that people use to impress students, simply stated. “Bel Canto” just means beautiful singing? It essentially is referring to a style of singing that has a lot of legato in it, that came from a specific region of Italy in the 18th century. Thats it, there is nothing magical about “Bel Canto”, unless you are led to believe that it is something more then what you could get with any other good teacher. Don’t believe me? Here is wikipedia’s definition. Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. So this simple less is, do not be fooled that “Bel Canto” means something “high brow” or a set of techniques that come from the ancient past when people were more wise and magical. The truth is, there has never been a time in the history of voice training where there has been more innovation, understanding and great techniques to help singers then the present. I would much rather be training my voice in the present era, then in the ancient past. For sure! Bel Canto is not a rare, ancient method of singing that supersedes anything that The Four Pillars of Singing is not already offering, or any other great vocal training program. Be careful not to get bamboozled by the “Bel Canto” buzz word hype. https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/
  23. Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/. Visit the world's highest rated vocal training program! One of the problems with “Bel Canto” is that it is a term that a lot of voice teachers use because it sounds interesting. “Bel Canto” sounds serious or, as if it is the ultimate in singing techniques or possesses the secrets of singing from a time long forgotten! Unfortunately, “Bel Canto” has become a “buzz” word that people use to impress students, simply stated. “Bel Canto” just means beautiful singing? It essentially is referring to a style of singing that has a lot of legato in it, that came from a specific region of Italy in the 18th century. Thats it, there is nothing magical about “Bel Canto”, unless you are led to believe that it is something more then what you could get with any other good teacher. Don’t believe me? Here is wikipedia’s definition. Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. So this simple less is, do not be fooled that “Bel Canto” means something “high brow” or a set of techniques that come from the ancient past when people were more wise and magical. The truth is, there has never been a time in the history of voice training where there has been more innovation, understanding and great techniques to help singers then the present. I would much rather be training my voice in the present era, then in the ancient past. For sure! Bel Canto is not a rare, ancient method of singing that supersedes anything that The Four Pillars of Singing is not already offering, or any other great vocal training program. Be careful not to get bamboozled by the “Bel Canto” buzz word hype. https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/ View full article