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Found 365 results

  1. Hello! I love classical singing music, and listen often. I only sing in the shower and when I listen to music, but now I want to take lessons. But first I will read about it, and watch Youtube videos. recorded voice range: Lowest note F, and highest c2 (tenor high c). But my personal best is Eb and d2 sometimes. Which is my vocal fach? My tessitura`? Thanks for helping!
  2. So I'm a tenor and 16 years old. But recently, I have gained an interest in low notes. I can usually go down to A2-G2 but it's pretty hard. Recently, I was able to go down to an F#2. I did reach a F2 and even an E2 once but i was told it was vocal fry. But really, I think the low notes are destroying my naturally high voice. I'm asking why am I gaining notes so fast all the sudden and what do I do to preserve my high range because since I started with low notes I can still hit a c5 but not as easily as I could. Please help. I don't want to turn into a baritone and lose my high range. And as a ps I have gone through puberty
  3. Hi there! I am new to this forum but I am going crazy and I need an analysis of technique or opinions of this singer! (Specifically 2:47 - 3:05) How is he able to pull so much weight up sounding full without narrowing his tone into (best way I can describe it) a little boys voice?! Compared to the 2nd video where (same song and singer) he just transitions to (correct me if I'm wrong) to mixed/head voice. or is he doing something completely different? (2nd video : 2:34 - 2:47) The singer is Korean! Thank you!
  4. Hey guys! I'm a guy, and have always had random access to which seems like the whistle register - although it seems like an extension of my falsetto and I never count it as my usual range. It comes and goes, more often not there, and usually airy and disconnected from the rest of my voice. But the WEIRDEST thing happened - I let out a yawn and made a noise. I went from the bottom of my range, up to my head voice (which stops at about E5), and went into a fully connected whistle register. I was hitting up to an E6 VERY clearly, completely connected to the rest of my voice. I was gliding up and down (to my lowest note - A2) with complete ease, and it felt and sounded more like a part of my head voice as opposed to an airy, difficult to produced falsetto. This has never happened to me before, so I found it pretty exciting I could easily get completely connected heady sounding note all the way up there. But alas, it just kinda stopped and I wish I recorded it for you guys to decipher what was going on! I was wondering if any other guys (or girls) have any experience of something like this happening. Are there any ways of nurturing this? Tried to do some lip rolls up there but now I can't access it as easily
  5. So after a long long while i returned to singing and even tough i sang this last year, i wasnt really practicing in a strickt sense of that word. But some good things happened to my voice. I will return to forum in pursuit of more vocal improvement. I wanted to share a small clip of some sirens up to C#5 for your reviewing. I understand this is far from perfect but this is something i havent been able to do before. https://app.box.com/s/xprqtqixm5zym91l4dxxenyr58ddi07d I just wanted to know if im on the right track to gaining vocal range or am i just shooting in the dark. Thanks!
  6. Hi, I am new here and I hope I am not breaking the forum rules by such questions So, I am 17 years old male who really likes singing but I am curre tly confused about many things. When I was a child (11-14 years maybe), I sang in a choir and I probably had one of the highest voices (so I was classified as boy soprano), but I stopped attending the choir around the age of 13/14. However, I didn't stop singing and I sang songs that I liked. I haven't really thought about such things as voice ranges until now though. By the way, classmates keep telling me that I have unnaturally high speaking voice. I have decided to join school choir few weeks ago and, to my surprise, not only I was classified as a tenor, but also I was told that my highest note they wanted me to sing - G4 - is higher than most tenors have. Well, as I've "tested" my vocal range (without any technique, warm up or so) few days before joining the choir, I was expecting they'll tell me I am a (high) baritone. So about my voice range (C4 is middle C I hope) - my absolute minimum is probably F2, but I usually can't sing comfortably below C3, my absolute maximum is A4, but I usually can't sing it comfortably (and sometimes I can't just sing it, for example when I've sung in this height for a long time - for example now ), so I suppose G4 is my "reasonable" maximum. Another strange thing is my falsetto. I have good-sounding falsetto, but the problem is that my falsetto maximum is C5, so I usually don't need to use it, as I can sing with my "normal" voice. I really like to practice singing in my boundaries, so I often try to sing around F2 and G/A4 (which leads to temporary (I hope) unability to sing A4 and sore throat. And I don't hear any registry changes, my voice sounds the same to me in every height (I can't hear any head voice or things like that)... So my questions are: Am I right when I think I am probably a baritone? Can I damage my voice by singing in my range boundaries? Is there a hope that I'll be able to extend my range to more "tenor" height (notes A4, B4, C5), for example when I start to attend a singing teacher (I think of that, but not just because of extending range, but because I simply want to practice my voice, as people tell me I have beautiful voice...) Similar question, but about falsetto - Can I extend my falestto above C5, for example F5? Even if such things are possible (I am definitely not sure), I understand it would be long and challenging.
  7. Hi, so I've been "playing" with my voice doing vocal fry and sirens, and right now i came across this resonance which i believe to be mix voice? Im pretty excited because i can reach higher notes relatively easy. Although without good support and vowel modification the notes just distort in my throat. the way this (mix voice?) feel its pretty much as it is usually described. i can place the note higher in my head or lower towards my chest. Its almost like breaking into falsetto but just hanging to chest resonance anyway I'll leave an mp3 so if anyone can give me some input it will be greatly appreciated!:) PD: i know there are some tuning issues hehe, but still id like to know if im on the right track! Thank you!!!
  8. I believe I am using too much air while singing clean vocals, this is great for when I want a breathy tone and when the song calls for it, but the thing is I don't know how to cut back on the air without letting my voice distort. Whenever I cut back on the air, vocal distortion kicks in, and my vocals get a grunge like rasp tone. I've discovered that whenever I sing anything above F#4, I can't sing it without vocal distortion kicking in. I don't believe it's an issue involving breath support, because I can sing all the way up to A4 comfortably, even though I can only sing above F#4 with a distorted tone. Too much air dries out my vocal chords pretty fast whenever I sing clean, and I often have to pause between lyrics and inhale fast so I can get enough breath for the next phrase, I manage to do it flawlessly, but it is annoying. Why can't I cut back on the air without my vocals distorting into a grunge/raspy tone?
  9. have heard the song a million times. Never payed attention to the breathing but once you hear it, you cant unhear it lol Is it normal to have this amount of breathing. Could he have gotten by on about half that amount of inhales? Ooh, mama Well (breath) look what's been done (breath) You can only see the stars After a (breath) setting sun (breath) You (breath) run for the money (breath) You don't even know about wild (breath) mountain honey it especially strikes me as odd to have the breaths right in the middle of phrases such as "after a (breath) setting sun" and "wild (breath) mountian honey" wouldn't the equivalent be "and she's (breath) buying a (breath) stairway (breath) to heaven" discuss
  10. I have lots of problems with my singing voice after speaking, as my speech is very heavy and inefficient. I have NO idea how to fix this, and I feel if I can speak more efficiently, or top-down, my singing voice will be much better and my vocal chords will be much more healthy. I was reading my Four Pillars of Singing PDF and this is touched upon, but I was wondering if there are any direct tips that I can implement into my speech? Thanks!
  11. What do you all think of Beyonce as a vocalist? She seems to have excellent control over her instrument. My only gripe is the clavicular breathing with the audible inhalation. Here are a few good videos of singing for you all to analyze: What do you all think?
  12. Hi Folks.. I have put up a few versions of this song earlier which were not too impressive. I am now beginning to get a lot more control on the passagio area, especially with a more "open" sound. I have two areas that I would appreciate feedback 1. Looking at my singing, I seem to be using more horizontal embouchure than vertical. I only very recently started looking at my singing in the mirror. Is there anything wrong in my embouchure. I am looking for dark tones in the upper range. Does a horizontal embouchure produce a "brighter" sound? 2. The second question is with respect to the mix and mic placement. My wife says I sound much better in person than what I am able to get the mix in my recordings to sound. This does not help me at all since we don't hear exactly our voice in the manner we sound to others. What could I be doing wrong? She says I sound very different in my recordings. Is this a function of the average quality of backing track or is it a mix issue? Any pointers would be very helpful. The mic I am using in this a Shure beta 58A. I record in an untreated room.
  13. In the Spanish wikipedia article for Falsete (I'm learning it by heart ) I've read this: The first sentence says: In the Bel Canto (opera) technique, Head Voice and Chest Voice are mixed and that way Passagio is camouflaged. Since my main interest is in improving some voice similar to this, I should have a clear idea about it but I don't right now... I'll keep thinking and investigating, and will be very much interested in reading what you think about it.
  14. Hey! I'm a 16 year old male. Currently my vocal range is E2 - C4 (D2 - C4 in the mornings and on a good day). I was wondering if my range would lower to at least a consistent C2 in the next couple of years, because I would love to sing bass in a a Capella group or a choir. I know E2 is a bass, but I really want to hit those lower notes. Any helpful comments and replies is greatly appreciated! Have a nice day!
  15. Ok, maybe a dumb question. The whole bridging/passaggio/belting thing. It gets confusing because we read that the male passaggio is typically starting somewhere around d4-f4. Ok, fair enough. Yet then we read that so and so likes to "belt"a b4 or c5. So if he can "belt" a b4 then how is his passaggio down somewhere around d4-f4? As a person becomes more trained does this all become a matter of semantics and/or shades of gray? for instance that same singer could probably hit a b4 in chest, or "mixed", or pure head voice, correct? And nevermind those 3 pictureword terms, he could probably hit NUMEROUS different shadings and versions of that same b4...correct? I think its just the term "bridging" that throws me. The term itself implies some sort of "digital" either/or thing when its really not that way. The term "bridge" make you think someone has done a trick or something lol. But if a guy sings a phrase from chest voice up to, say, a4-b4...its not going to stand out like "omg, he bridged!"...correct? Obviously a trained singer isnt going to all of a sudden hit one specific note and his while vocal character change So the term "bridging"...does it really almost apply more to sirens that to singing actual phrases? Any good examples out there of guys singing phrases where they obviously bridged within the phrase? Obviously there are plenty of examples where guys belt B4-c5ish stuff in pure chest. Its like there are SO many examples of belts around b4 that it makes it hard to understand the passaggio being said to be around d4-f4ish
  16. Hi everyone, Im Connor Aiden a 17 year old vocalist currently in training in London (Popular Performance Vocals) and I'm having a bit of trouble regarding my 'official' voice type. Although I have sang in classical styles I initially taught myself how to sing and mainly listen to female singers which has confused me about which octave I sing things in. I was also put in a choir as a tenor so have been reading treble clef and unknowingly singing an octave down the whole time. I thought I must be a baritone but I have a peculiar higher falsetto range: Chest: G2-E4 (Strong, Belty as I get to D/E4) Mixed: I am working on but seem to have no mixing traits currently Falsetto: F4-F#5 (Breathy, Slightly Unclean) (can bring it down to B4) If anyone has any information or knowledge to share I would be very grateful as It would clear a lot of problems up and get me on the right track vocally. Thankyou!
  17. Hello. I joined a choir, so my interest is in developing my head voice, which was totally abandoned (I was in a choir as a child). I saw Felipe's video on low notes and realized I was singing too often in my high notes now, so started singing some in my low notes but in Head Voice. But do you think it would also be good for me to sing some in strong chest voice? My throat was totally underused until I started now in the choir. I hope I was able to make the question clear. Tell me if I didn't.
  18. Hi there, I have one little question to all of you. When I now try to engage a more chestier sound into my singing (singing around C4-C5) I am still feeling this light mechanism in my voice, however, the sound is more powerful and when I put a hand on my chest bones, there are actual vibrations. If I then add twang (correctly) it's even louder, but not belt qualityish. So the question is, does feeling these vibrations in my chest bones actually means I am empowering the chest quality to my voice, even when singing higher pitches? hope you can help me out!
  19. Me tackling some progressive metal! Thanks to kristoffer for the amazing backtrack and guitar
  20. Hi guys I've been trying to cover this song for a while.. The problem is... that when i sing the high notes, my head voice tone is too bright (maybe?). I try to make it sound more chesty but all i got is this Thinking Out Loud Cover It sound to me that the sound is too light and breathy, isn't it? What exercise should i do to improve that?
  21. Three and half years ago I decided I wanted to have a deeper voice. I did some research and found an article that suggested saying your ABC's in a deeper voice everyday until your voice became that pitch. THIS WAS A HUGE MISTAKE. It has massively hurt my communication skills and left me sounding very unnatural and unpleasant . After years of trying to correct it by speaking my way back to my naturally voice, going through phases of pain and scratchiness, I think it's as good as it can be without some help from people who know what their doing. I'm coming to this great community for advice on how to get back to my original voice and get on sounding the way I was meant to sound! Sincerely- RecoveringFromTheDeep
  22. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  23. Hi everyone! I'm a 20 y/o guy who has always had passion for singing. I've never taken lessons myself as I can't afford them, but I have trained with Singing Success for about two years, and have recently started Ken Tamplin's Vocal Academy (with HUGE improvements!) I know it's not really that important, but I would like to find out my voice type. The problem is, my voice feels kinda weird and I'm really not sure where I fit. From birth, I have had a very easily accessible head voice going up to F5 on a normal day (NOT in falsetto), and a chest voice going down to G2 (The sound is full and rich here, and I can go lower with a vocal fry). I'm not 100% sure where I start mixing, approx. around E4. My voice is mix sounds light and agile, and I lose almost all of the weight from the lower part of my register. I'm very well connected, so I find it kinda difficult to pinpoint exactly where I transition into head. Right now, I can hit a C5 in a very heady mix (which I think is pretty good seeing as I've never had professional lessons hehe). My normal speaking voice is in the lower third octave so I can VERY comfortably sing in this range, but I can comfortably vocalise throughout my current range freely without any stress (no strain, keeping a neutral larynx, open throat, etc.) I wouldn't say my voice has any sort of booming depth, but it is quite warm (getting lighter as I ascend higher in chest), and somewhat agile, and some tendency of sounding nasal (not exactly NASAL, but I can't think of the proper word right now). So basically, my range form chest to head is G2-F5. I know it's asking a lot, but could anyone hazard a guess of where I could fit in? I would really like to see a vocal teacher, but right now I'm short of money, so it would be greatly appreciated if you guys could give me some advice until I do Thanks!
  24. I have a plain question which is bugging me. In theory and practically too, would, say, 10 minutes plain vocal fry going up and down from head to chest resonance actually result in better cord closure? I've done the straw exercise and felt next to no difference after perhaps two weeks of a losely followed schedule. I suppose the question also applies to; does singing the low register which I'm a bit wobbly in make it less uncertain? I'm talking below G3 where I have no problem hitting notes but a harder time controlling pitch and sustain.