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Found 203 results

  1. Hey everyone, I am stuck with a tiny bit of a dilemma. I play in a cover band in which every member does their share of singing, but while there are some songs I want to sing, I have major problems doing so because I cant hit the notes without going falsetto. I sing a lot of rock and country and while country isn't too much of a problem, I'm starting to hit the proverbial wall with rock. The voice range that I am comfortable singing in is more of a baritone (think Trace Adkins, maybe a touch higher than that.) so when I try to hit notes in songs like This Love by Maroon 5 or even some punk rock songs (Stacy's Mom by Fountains of Wayne or Ohio by Bowling for Soup.) it sounds like my voice is thinning out and my projection just goes away all together unless I sing falsetto but then the tone doesn't fit the song. I know the best way to improve is practice and possibly professional help. But at this current point all I can afford is practice. What I am getting to here, is how can I get my range higher, and not have to sound like my voice is thin or struggling. Are there any exercises or techniques that could help me. Thank you in advance
  2. If I do vocal exercises in head voice, and not in chest voice, will that still improve my chest voice? Or are they like 2 different things? If I only practice head voice, only my head voice improves and not my chest voice?
  3. Hey, I'm new here and I don't know if this is the right forum, so excuse me please currently my voice type is Bass. I go down to C#2-D2, even C2 in good days, and I'm 16 years old. there is a chance that I will be a Basso Profundo sometime? (I'm not russian) My Father reaches just like to Eb2 or something, and I have an big brother that only reach F#2, but again, I'm still young and I don't know if my voice is fully changed.. Thanks!
  4. ( *Laryngoscopy result of my vocal folds Hello fellas out there! This is my first post in this modernvocalistworld forum and as a singer,im really proud to find this kind of forum where i can ask or share something regarding vocas. My name is Rolando and im 17 y/o singer living in Indonesia.I've been singing for many times and i'm really enjoyed it.I was part of a band that have regular concert schedule. So lets get to the point, 6 or 7 months ago,i had a full schedule of concert in one day,so from the morning until the evening i did sing without quality vocal rest,then next morning after that concert,i wake up and i realized that my voice already became breathy and hoarse.I thought it will only occur for 5 days or 7 days but i've been experiencing this damage for 6 or 7 months and i already went to the best ENT doctor on my town and i did a checkup to my vocal cords and that is the result.(on the picture i attached with this post upside) I knew it was all of my fault not to warming up properly and just sing without taking care of my vocal folds,but i'm really stressed to see that my voice is not yet recovered for many months. I already gargled with salt water and did many things as my ENT doctor instructed but it still the same,it breaks my heart. So what is the problem with me? What should i do ? Or is it a permanent and major vocal damage that has no medicine? If singer tea can fix this i will try to buy one. Thanks ^^ Note: I still can speak loud and sing but my singing quality is degradated so much,now i cant hold a note for a long time and my vocal pliabilty has gone aswell,though my vibrato is still clean and good.
  5. What it this style called? id assume maybe "blues shouter" What are the main ingredients here? Is this just basic hardcore chest belting? Its a pretty cool sound in a way but id be nervous distorting that much....is this healthy? I think the highest note may be a brief B4 but its mostly a lot around G4-A4ish
  6. I had my lesson with my vocal coach yesterday. He noticed that I, firstly, was going to hard on the vocals. Meaning, I was in some instances pushing too hard or semi-screaming or yelling. Secondly, he noticed that I didn't have good connection between head and chest. So, he suggested that I start with very soft sirens in order to get a good foundation of connection, then eventually add power to it. He showed me some exercises that bring the chest up into head and head down into chest. He said that a mix between the two is what I'm aiming for, which makes sense. So, after observing me doing a few exercises, he said that I should start doing some strengthening of the connection between around A3-F4 to start, then gradually move up tone by tone. Does this seem like a good idea? I'm wondering what I should do when I reach the limits of what I can bring chest into (right now, the max I can do is A4, but it's harsh). At what point do I want to go into pure head voice? Mixed? And lastly, does what my vocal coach says make sense to you all? I look forward to hearing your thoughts.
  7. Hello, I'm a baritone. I'm only 15, so that could change, who knows, but I've been looking into extending my range downwards and have had good results. My normal range is from F2-C5, although once warmed up I can get a D2 that's very unstable, but not fry. I learned about "Subharmonics", and decided to try them out. After about a week I've developed the technique to take me down to a G1, ugly it may be. The reason I'm posting here is because during this week, I've developed a strange... "partial" on my voice. (I'm a brass player, so this is the only way I know to say how it feels.) This partial starts at C2, and ends at about D1-E1, and I don't think its fry. It's not as pretty as say a full chest voice, however, its very connected and not separated like fry tends to be. Its hard to control, but it's there. Is this some type of fry I've randomly developed? Is it maybe subharmonics that I've somehow figured out? Any input? Very curious.
  8. So, nasality in full voice. Is it possible for the average singer to achieve? I've gotten to a point where I can belt one of the highest songs I Know, which has a ending chorus between the notes G#4 and E5, in full voice; and the rest of the song is the same but only like one semitone lower. So listening to myself, I was impressed with the achievement and the ability to crescendo the sounds for more emotion.......but I realized that I was still lacking a huge amount of nasality and upper energy. I found that when I sang it, I had a lower level and medium level of adduction, both which worked, but the high or nasal level doesn't work at all. It's like a level of head voice that might exist, but it just doesn't no matter how hard I pinch and force my diaphragm. In my last topic I was confused as how to approach texture development, and it worked itself out. But now it's like, how do I use a texture that's already developed. Do I use the middle approach and try to employ twang? What I'm asking is, is a nasally head voice a plausible approach for an average or well developed singer. If a voice matures enough does it lose that nasally full voice? I never had a nasally full voice at any point within 8 years, so it's like..... DO I twang lower, or DO I try to get higher? Since my diaphragm and phrasing won't cooperate at such a high level, maybe I answered my question. And a weird thing for me is that my voice is clearly towards a higher tenor now. In my last topic, I was just starting to move past a low tenor, and since then my texture has lightened 5 or 6 times, but I'm not anymore nasal than before; just a lot more light.
  9. This is a hard one, at the same time we all repeat "stay in full voice" and "stay in modal voice", I understand perfectly that the question that would naturally arise is: "How the hell do I do that?" And usually, the recommendation is to go strong. Which is not a perfect solution, but when used with the correct positions CAN allow someone trying it out to figure it out and feel how its like to use the voice in this way. Its such a special and different sensation that many people label it as a new register even though its just the same voice you use to speak with. When that works, its quite nice. However, it can be very frustrating when it doesn't, and there aren't many other choices to experience it. Messing around with something that Daniel mentioned one of these days in a conversation, I kinda rigged together some aspects that make sense thinking of physiology and that I got people to do it (and it worked on both more experience and new students). So first, lets explain a bit the idea. What is the problem to begin with? Well the problem is that the use of modal voice is associated with habitual tensions, and its very frequent that the release of the tensions produces a break in modal registration. Independent control of this is of course totally possible, but can be tricky to figure out. More specifically, when the tensions are released, medial compression is lost and the body of the folds disengages from the movement. So what we need is a reference to increase the medial tension without adding the habitual tensions back in. When should I give this a try? When you have issues breaking above the first passage even though you are sure you are adjusting the vowels and supporting it well. What do I need to know in order to try this? You will need to know how to use vocal fry. You will need to know how to use falsetto WITHOUT being airy. Its very desirable that you know how to use falsetto with a piercing quality, the Bee Gees voice I often mention. How to do it: - First define what you will be working on, for example, and its a quite good example because it goes on the wound almost every time with males. Let's say you want to sing the chorus from "Man in The Box" from Alice in Chains. That A#4 is tricky, because it has a HUGE amount of power behind it and anything less just doesnt cut it. So, lets take a look at the note, the line goes: Feed my eyes. A narrow EE in there will not work (you can do it but it will start to sound like heavy metal, not good for this song), so listen to Layne and you will hear that he sang it like: Fehd mah ahs. (I know some of you got all happy with this one, but its not supposed to sound like that in the end result! ) Which is good enough for the purpose of this exercise. Ok, but wait, don't just go there yet. BEFORE, you are going to practice doing this: - Sing it as LOW as you can possibly go in VOCAL FRY, making sure that all the vowels adjust in the way written up there (Fehd Mah Ahs), trying to find a very relaxed way to produce fry, and already using the placement you normally work with. And by low I mean Siberian Deep Bass morning voice. Map down how it feels like to produce vocal fry, pay close attention to the adjustments and most importantly, what happens as soon as you intend to produce it. Practice going just for this "intention of fry" but not producing sound. Then, sing it on the normal pitch (attack in the A#4), however, in a relaxed falsetto. Try to make it piercing already because you will need it, again using the vowels you will need for the phrase, again using the placement you need. And map this down also. Now practice alternating, VERY DEEP vocal fry, then totally detached piercing BEE GEEs like falsetto. Go back and forth. And feel each. - Finally, you will do this, you will simply create the intention of singing it in the very low fry voice, KEEP that feeling, then just add the falsetto to it and go strong with this, don't think of modal voice or chest, think of this weird combination (fry and falsetto INTENTIONS) and **blast** it out. Chances are, it will be weird and all over the place, which is good. Weird and strange is better than a secure half-assed voice that can't do what you want, at least there is a chance to correct it. Insist on it, give it some shots, even if it doesnt work right away. If you feel tired, or if you are trying it over and over and it just dont work, relax, go do something else, then after 30 minutes or so, try again. If you believe the A#4 is too high for you in the moment, try another phrase that uses G4, G#4 or A4, lower than that will probably go outside the problem spot for most males, but feel free to try it. Girls can raise these references by 3 or 4 semitones (or just work on the A#4, it won't be easy either :P). What you should not do (IMPORTANT): The idea is producing the intention you have when you PREPARE to produce fry, and not to produce a fry like sound. Its NOT supposed to be a "creaky door" exercise, and its NOT supposed to produce creak distortion, the "falsetto" intention should prevent it. Sing that thing clean and strong, and make it sound good. Also, don't try to produce soft voice yet, think powerful, because it is. I strongly recommend you get the basics of breathing/support down because you won't be able to sustain this if you do not breath properly and create the necessary pressure (the attack at least should work). And that's it! I would really like to know how it goes for you folks, even if you already have the necessary control down. There are several exercises that make use of fry in a somewhat similar way, but this particular idea I have never seen explored. Video is done: Felipe
  10. Hi guys I'm kind of a beginner so please bare with me, and sorry if something like this has been answered elsewhere before. One of the things that really makes certain belts stand out to me is that 'ringing' quality. Not necessarily a overly cutting sound, but a nice round 'pingy' ringing sound. An example of such a belt is below (3.10-3.40, the first 'OOOOH', then 'BLIND', then 'YOUR', 'TRY TRY and TRY' - the whole climax sounds super nice but especially these notes). There are dozens of other examples but I always loved this especially. But my main question is, what is this? Is this twang? What is it EXACTLY that achieves such a round 'ringing' on notes? And HOW?
  11. Hey everyone, I'm a newcomer to the forums so I'd greatly appreciate your help and insights! I started singing a year ago. My university offers voice class for non music majors so this semester I enrolled and that has been going well. My favorite genres are opera, prog metal, 70s rock, and legit style musical theater. I'm not into the whole voice type thing because voices seem to lie more on a continuous spectrum than the traditional discrete categories (soprano, mezzo, etc.). But when I listen to Dream Theater, it seems that James LaBrie's comfort zone and where he sounds best is higher than most guys. I don't even like the terms chest voice and head voice because there's really only one voice but in terms of describing a sound, I would say JLB uses a chest-dominant sound all the way up to the D5. For me personally, there is a resonance transition around C4 and another one near F#4. After F#4 I have a very head-dominant tone. But what if you're going for the James LaBrie sound? I like the way he sings the upper notes--very stable larynx, doesn't sound shrill. Now I'm not a fan of everything he does, like excessive vowel modification and muddied articulation but overall I think there's a lot I could learn from the way he sings open and free. So my questions are, what are your observations on James LaBrie's techniques? If you've sung Dream Theater, what were your strategies for tackling those songs? I'm interested in hearing particularly from those who aren't as high-pitched as JLB. And how do you sustain being in the upper 4th octave? He's consistently in the G4-D5 range and sings B4 for days!
  12. I have a pretty high voice so this is weird for me. I usually can not go below A2 but recently this morning I went down to either a F2 or a E2. I don't know if it was because I just woke up but i would like to know why on this situation lol. But the main thing is, how much can my low range extend if I am 16 years old? I am hoping not to much, as I don't want it to make me lose my high range
  13. Hi, Kind of a basic question, I was wondering if anyone has suggestions for some exercises where I can develop a stronger chest voice. I'm male and I'm most comfortable in a tenor/countertenor range. I can hit high notes easily, but others have said my lower range lacks strength and sounds a bit hollow/breathy like a yawn, almost like a bit of falsetto mixed in. I'm trying my best at breath control and making sure the voice is "pushed down" and coming from chest. I guess the perfect chest voice is one that sounds like you're giving an important speech? That's what I'm trying to achieve. I don't really have the time for regular singing lessons as I just sing as a hobby. Sometimes it's difficult to evaluate your own singing because not only is the sound I hear in my ears when I sing very different from what others hear, but it's natural for people to simply think their own voice sounds bad or weird when recorded and played back. Thanks.
  14. I didn't use to train falsetto but when I started doing so last month I noticed it was helping me open up and remove unnecessary tensions, as well as establishing better placement in the hard and soft palate region. Now in the G4-C#5 range I feel my voice wants to release into those notes, but for whatever reason I've been hitting a wall. I suspect this is due to a mixture of factors: 1. Poor use of the breath. The higher I go the less breath I need, not more. If I blast the vocal folds with too much air, of course they just get slammed wide open. I am learning to use as minimal air as possible for falsetto to get used to the sensation of suspension when singing. 2. Sub-optimal vowels. I may be keeping the same shape as in the low & middle part of my voice, and it seems some gradual adjustment needs to done to go higher. 3. Incorrect mental visualization of the tone. Since everything starts with the mind, I need to have a mental picture of what the desired sound will be BEFORE I sing it. And this may be part of the reason why my larynx has been shooting up and choking off the sound. When I have a lower larynx I find it easier to sing because I have more acoustic space, greater stability, and a warmer, more balanced timbre. So basically I'm curious if training falsetto has helped open up your upper notes and if so, how did you use that as an intermediate step to learn your full/complete voice coordination? I feel that I am almost there but missing some steps, especially with complete adduction, proper vowels, breath management/efficiency, and a lowered/more stable larynx.
  15. Hey guys! I have been thinking about what is physically different inside when someone has a more accentuated F1 ( shouty/yell quality ), versus someone that doesn't have a big difference between his "high chest" shouty range and his "mix" or above his bridge point. Is this what makes voices more "dramatic", "heroic", "lyrical" ? What is this acoustic space, where is it ? Does it have a distinct sound or participation in the high range, even if you are out of F1? Do Baritones have bigger Overdrive/Yelly sound than lighter voices? So these are several questions I've asked myself, do you guys have any observations on it? Any experience? What can your voices do?
  16. I think I speak really inefficiently. My voice goes, mainly my mix, and my tone completely goes. All the weight comes back in my voice. I really have no idea how to fix this. Lip rolls etc help in the short-term but I think I need to change the way I speak. It's almost as if all the training goes as soon as I start speaking Anyone have any tips?
  17. Where do you guys feel your resonance on low notes and high notes? I never feel it in the mask, on high notes I can feel it on or slightly above the soft pallete but mostly I feel nothing except for ocassionally a little vibration on both sides of my throat right under the chin. I've read that some people can feel the resonance in the top of their heads which just seems insane to me. I'm asking because It's weird and cool that everyone feels the resonance in different areas.
  18. Since every single thread recently seems to derail into a talk about registers in some manner, and no one made a thread for it, this will be around for a while. So if you feel like talking about M1, chest, head, falsetto, heady, mixed, or anything else of similar content, this is the place. Posts on other threads that do not have an objective and specific point in regards to the thread subject and that start to go in the direction of "M2 is the new M1" usuall conversations most likely will be deleted. "To do that thing well, keep in your normal voice, like this: sample shown" - Fine "In 1952 when observing the M3 register using high energy plasma on professional opera rockstars, scientists figure that..." - Should be in here What do you need to know about registers: There are five different ways of seeing this particular subject that comes to my mind right away: - A mechanical register: M0,M1,M2,M3 - An area of pitch: "All above note T4 is head, bellow, chest." - A quality or intensity used: Heady -> Soft. Chesty -> Strong, Mix -> middle. - A specific position of the vocal tract. - A sensation. The way it was used on classical technique, was more about the later two, and even so on its begining it was really just the sensation, that's where the names "chest" and "head" came from to begin with. What is important to keep in mind is that since its a reference of sensation, it does have pedagogic value but it will not reflect exactly into any of the first. There are specific coordinations that are know to produce the sensations, but they were unknown when the terms were first used and the ideals of both sounds and execution started to appear. This initial post will be updated with relevant information as it appears along the way. I will do an effort to include samples for each of the ideas, probably with the help of Dan and Jens if they are up to it :).
  19. So I can hit the high notes I want too hit but they tend to have a slight raspy edge to them, I can make it sound not raspy if I open my mouth really wide but then I can't seem to narrow my vowels and it sound kind of dopey. I Feel like I should be releasing tension and giving more power to the head voice in my mix at this point but I just don't know how.
  20. I consider myself a beginner even though I've been practicing with various different methods for a few years (online). I am able to bridge my passaggio with complete ease and sing throughout my entire range without strain, hell, even my belts in mixed sound pretty good sometimes. BUT, I hate the rest of my voice, when I'm singing softly/normally. It just sounds so boring and dull, but I have no idea how to make my tone better. I find most of the training focuses on bridging the passaggio + singing in mixed/m2 and stuff - but what about if you hate your tone? I mean, it has improved a little over the years but nowhere near as much as the other areas. Any tips for improving the softer aspects of the voice? Is it a key thing? I really wanna take some lessons in real life but I'm very short on cash and I'm shy (hence not uploading any audio sample here, sorry I know that just text isn't a lot to go on) plus most of the people I can afford are usually SLS...
  21. Just getting tips on YouTube is NOT EVER going to help you to sing better. A free tip without content and your commitment to practice and train, will do nothing for you. To sing better, you have to train, practice and sing songs. TheFourPillarsofSinging.com.
  22. So, just the other night as a part of my class, I had to sing and though I was nervous, after going through the song beforehand, I felt a bit more confident. However, it didn't show in my singing where my voice wasn't projecting as well as it should've. I was also making little body movement and I couldn't hit certain high notes like I was able to when I practiced. Overall, after the performance, my voice was a little raspy and my throat was hurting me. I will say, I'm not trained at all, but I am looking for singing lessons after the semester is over. Is this normal? I had such a hard time using my head voice and I know I could sing better than I did last time. Any suggestions on what I should do? Thanks
  23. I'm extremely confused. According to this video: I can go from G3 to C5. Now, the chart says I'm a mezzo-soprano, but my voice doesn't sound dark or heavy at all! I can go low, but as soon as I enter what I think is my mixed voice, my voice sounds bright and high. I'm talking about this sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1znaw5PugOE (She's the only singer I found with my voice sorta). What am I? I like the sound of my chest voice a lot, but it's pretty useless.
  24. Robert Lunte - "Nocturne" I love this song, I hope you do too... Some of you have heard this. This is the Final production. Special thanks to my team Zack Uidl, Jason Shavey and Clay Copeland.
  25. just wondering if anyone else suffers with this, every time i have a vocal lesson/ warm up my voice the tone and quality of my voice changes. i go from sounding very pop to sounding like a very weak opera singer. i find it very weird then about 20 minutes to half an hour later my voice goes back to a stronger better sounding pop voice. i asked my tutor about it and he's never had any other student who suffers from this i just wondering if anyone else suffers from/ can explain why this is happening. thanks