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Found 473 results

  1. YOUR INSTRUMENT - UNDERSTANDING THE WHOLE VOICE: A 4-PART SERIES Co-authored by Dena Murray & Hilary Canto The series is presented as downloadable pdf files below so that you can easily print them. We'd love you to have a discussion thread here in the comments section. Please add any questions/comments below. We hope you enjoy the series! Thank you Dena & Hilary Left-Click here to download Part 1 Left-Click here to download Part 2 Left-Click here to download Part 3 Left-Click here to download Part 4 Dena Murray teaches in- home and online beginners as well as professionals with her own style technique for correct placement of the voice as well the art of breathing. Books available are: Vocal Technique: Finding your Real Voice (Hal Leonard Corp. 2002), a beginner's book separating the voice before teaching how to bridge the passaggio. Advanced Vocal Technique: Middle Voice, Placement & Styles co-authored with Tita Hutchison (Hal Leonard Publishing 2007) focuses strictly on placement and a unique technical approach to bridging the passaggio. Vocal Strength and Power: Boost Your Singing with Proper Technique and Breathing to be published By Hal Leonard Publishing, end 2009. You can find her on the TMV Directory Of Experts. www.denamurray.com Hilary Canto teaches in-home and online and developed the TRUE VOICE COURSE specially for allowing the voice to flow freely from the heart and to teach healthy vocal technique for performance singing. The course is available as mp3 files with written sheets to download. You can purchase it through and see her training videos to accompany the course on her TMV, youtube and myspace pages. You can find her on the TMV Directory of Experts.
  2. incessantmace

    Head Voice Cracking

    http://vocaroo.com/i/s1MBcg9w8BvC   When my voice cracks like this, does it mean I'm not supporting enough, or haven't I strengthened my twang musculature enough yet? I thought it was the latter myself since I still can't phonate quack mode in headvoice. When I do try my voice cracks and goes all over the place as if I'm yodeling. Really weird sounding and not pleasant. I could record a sample of it if necessarry.   I've been practicing with the Four Pillars of singing for about 10 weeks now and recently I've started taking Skype lessons with a local TVS teacher here in the Netherlands.
  3. aravindmadis

    Bed of Roses(Bon Jovi)

    Hi Folks.   I sang this is my college days nearly 13 years ago.  I sang it that time before knowing that something called "head voice" existed.  I am a much more knowledgeable about singing.     I have long wanted to cover this song.  This is a single take.  So there are few instances where i am not bang on the center of the note and some places where I run out of breath.  At some level I like the authenticity of a live performance, which is the kind of singing I am training myself for.  This is a very difficult song for me and sits smack on my passagio.  I always seem to get into trouble singing "For tonaaayt, Ahell sleeep on a baaaaaaaad'onaaaaaaayls".  I have used a lighter onset singing that particular line, hopefully it does not distort the colour of the tone       Thank you for your feedback.  
  4. Introduction Female singers have a wide range of tone qualities available to them. For many classical as well as nonclassical singers, the upper octave of the vocal range is performed using what we colloquially call the 'head voice', which is produced by a combination of laryngeal configuration and resonance adjustment. With some small modifications, the tone quality of the upper middle, and even the middle voice can be produced so as to be perceived as consistent with this upper voice. In this and future articles we will explore how female singers who use the 'head voice' accomplish it in their various ranges. The Resonance Transition into the High Range As female voices ascend in pitch into the middle of the treble staff, the fundamental frequency of the sung note begins to approach the frequency of the lowest vowel formant, F1. This freqency varies by voice type, by vowel, and to a certain extent, by the technique of the singer. Generally, women with long vocal tracts, and/or who sing with low larynx, will have F1 at a lower frequency for a given vowel than those who have shorter vocal tracts, and/or who sing with a neutral or high larynx. Additionally, some vowels have lower F1 than others. For example, the vowels /i/ (ee) and /u/ (oo) have lower F1 than /o/ (oh), /e/ (ay) and /a/ (ah). These factors, taken together, determine the frequency of F1 for that singer for that vowel, using that particular technique. Singing an upward scale on a single vowel, as the fundamental approaches F1 for that vowel, that harmonic becomes progressively more resonant, to the point that it is the very loudest in the voice. This is the first characteristic of the so-called female 'head voice': In the upper range, its loudest harmonic is the fundamental. Some Spectragraphic Examples - Whitney Houston This first example is of Whitney Houston, singing the highest note (on the vowel /u/ (oo)) in her performance of 'I will Always Love You' available on youTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGC003Xz3CY Its in the section after the modulation (at about 3:40) and she sings this note several times. Except for the instrumental components on the extreme left end, the five highest peaks in this are from Whitney's voice, and you can see that the first one (the fundamental) is quite a bit taller (louder) than all the rest. Angela Gheorghiu - Top note on Puccini 'Un Bel Di' This one is taken from the top Bb of this famous aria, at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNKWzml7zlY as sung by Operatic Lyric Soprano Angela Gheorghiu. I've labeled the fundamental, so that it can be seen even though there is clutter from the orchestra (they are playing fully Forte, and doubling her note), Barbra Streisand - Who's afraid of the Big Bad Wolf This one is from a very early recording of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3SmmKtR8Bw. Here, she is singing the vowel /a/ (ah) on the B above the treble staff.Barbra's, and released on 'The Barbra Streisand Album'. The headvoice tone is heard, used in an almost mocking way, at about 1:56 in the recording at 'Head Voice' in the middle range While it most commonly appears in the upper range, 'Head Voice' quality is not limited to there. For many classical singers (and also for nonclassical when singing softly), head tone is achievable in the middle and upper middle by managing a glottal closed phase somewhat less than 50%, and by using darker vowels. In a future article, I will write on the dynamics of this particular kind of vocalism.
  5. Introduction Female singers have a wide range of tone qualities available to them. For many classical as well as nonclassical singers, the upper octave of the vocal range is performed using what we colloquially call the 'head voice', which is produced by a combination of laryngeal configuration and resonance adjustment. With some small modifications, the tone quality of the upper middle, and even the middle voice can be produced so as to be perceived as consistent with this upper voice. In this and future articles we will explore how female singers who use the 'head voice' accomplish it in their various ranges. The Resonance Transition into the High Range As female voices ascend in pitch into the middle of the treble staff, the fundamental frequency of the sung note begins to approach the frequency of the lowest vowel formant, F1. This freqency varies by voice type, by vowel, and to a certain extent, by the technique of the singer. Generally, women with long vocal tracts, and/or who sing with low larynx, will have F1 at a lower frequency for a given vowel than those who have shorter vocal tracts, and/or who sing with a neutral or high larynx. Additionally, some vowels have lower F1 than others. For example, the vowels /i/ (ee) and /u/ (oo) have lower F1 than /o/ (oh), /e/ (ay) and /a/ (ah). These factors, taken together, determine the frequency of F1 for that singer for that vowel, using that particular technique. Singing an upward scale on a single vowel, as the fundamental approaches F1 for that vowel, that harmonic becomes progressively more resonant, to the point that it is the very loudest in the voice. This is the first characteristic of the so-called female 'head voice': In the upper range, its loudest harmonic is the fundamental. Some Spectragraphic Examples - Whitney Houston This first example is of Whitney Houston, singing the highest note (on the vowel /u/ (oo)) in her performance of 'I will Always Love You' available on youTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGC003Xz3CY Its in the section after the modulation (at about 3:40) and she sings this note several times. Except for the instrumental components on the extreme left end, the five highest peaks in this are from Whitney's voice, and you can see that the first one (the fundamental) is quite a bit taller (louder) than all the rest. Angela Gheorghiu - Top note on Puccini 'Un Bel Di' This one is taken from the top Bb of this famous aria, at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNKWzml7zlY as sung by Operatic Lyric Soprano Angela Gheorghiu. I've labeled the fundamental, so that it can be seen even though there is clutter from the orchestra (they are playing fully Forte, and doubling her note), Barbra Streisand - Who's afraid of the Big Bad Wolf This one is from a very early recording of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3SmmKtR8Bw. Here, she is singing the vowel /a/ (ah) on the B above the treble staff.Barbra's, and released on 'The Barbra Streisand Album'. The headvoice tone is heard, used in an almost mocking way, at about 1:56 in the recording at 'Head Voice' in the middle range While it most commonly appears in the upper range, 'Head Voice' quality is not limited to there. For many classical singers (and also for nonclassical when singing softly), head tone is achievable in the middle and upper middle by managing a glottal closed phase somewhat less than 50%, and by using darker vowels. In a future article, I will write on the dynamics of this particular kind of vocalism. View full articles
  6. Hi guys!    I'm a vocal coach primarily but have my own short comings/insecurities as a vocalist myself which I would love to get your feedback on. I make a major effort to produce a twang sound in my head voice when singing pop as I really struggle with singing in my mix due to my training being classical. I also think I'm just genetically set up to sing predominately in my head voice. Any tips welcome on how I could get in to that mix or let me know if I tricked you during this track in to thinking that I used mix at any stage.    '>
  7. MdM

    Fatigue/weakness

    Guys,  I chanced upon the pinned "How to Sing in the Style of Steve Perry" video last night right before bed, and on a whim, decided to sing along.  I was surprised to find that I could do it just fine, especially with his pointers.  It felt so easy and efficient and, being somewhat lazy, I liked not having to work so hard.  I had been working lately on light singing and sirens and letting the voice do what it wanted at light volumes, so perhaps I was already in that mode.     Anyway, today I warmed up and tried it again and it did not feel too good.  What had felt easy last night was a bit of a struggle.  I didn't think much of it... I then went to try that style on "Hotel California", and what came out was a kind of reedy screech.  I was puzzled.     I downshifted and tried to sing "Smooth", which I think goes above E4 rarely, and there just really wasn't anything there.  That song usually feels too low, but it does lie in my speaking range, at least.    Voice felt tired and didn't want to cooperate with the lighter singing.  More intense, "overdrive" or "belting" sounds seemed okay, although by this time I was ready to shut it down and didn't want to make whatever it was worse.  I am not a big-time belter, but I think I generally sing above the passagio in a lightish "overdrive" up to G4-B4 or so.  I can sing in a falsettoish head voice up to E5 or more, especially in exercises.    Any ideas as to what could have been the cause?  My theory is that the heady, light "mixed voice" thing in the video uses a different part of the voice than my usual activities, so that part (M2?) fatigued quickly and needs recovery time.       
  8. Recently i made a thread where i posted a siren goi ng up to C#5 and people said it was a head voice...so i tried to apply similar thing to singing and even tough im not having a HUGE proggress i am slowly learning to find that configuration..   So i decided to record another short clip to demonstrate what i am doing..   So is this also head voice or not...also notice my break down at the bottom in the end of the clip...any tips on how to strenghten that   https://app.box.com/s/kntp1krd9qyo0lxsg4mq6kcpa7bv9yor - new clip     https://app.box.com/...5xydo3mo6usnr8j - siren from the old thread for comparison
  9. This is a monstrously tough song for me.  So currently, I am happy with being able to sing all notes.  Perhaps this is just out of my skill set now, so I am not seeking perfection in this version, but areas that I can improve.. I plan to do a re-post in the next few weeks when I have reached a higher level in my skill set..   I am not at all happy with the ad lib section.  I am not able to get enough cord closure on the high head voice notes and it sounds breathy to me. How do I fix this?  Are there any exercises that I can do? I am seeking specific inputs relating to this..    Also any other technical glitches....   As always, a big thank you to everyone who finds the time to listen and drop a few sentences....       
  10. I was practicing some head tones today and found that I have no issue going up through F5 with this configuration.   To me, it sounds like more of an M1/Belty configuration. If it is, then I find it interesting that I can go up through F5 win this way and I can't get passed A#4 with consistency in a more heady configuration. Or maybe it's just the vowel I'm going with?   What I usually end up doing is shading the vowel to more of an "uh" anywhere between G4 and A4/A#4.   No constriction or choking at all... very free and open. Just wanted to see what the community though about it.   3 files in the playlist here:  
  11. After just recently discovering my head voice I complained about only being able to achieve whisper volume sounds.  All of sudden I am finding myself able to grow the resonance in my connected head register a bit but it's a very new feeling and not yet free or really applicable.  I will post a clip and I ask if anyone can relate to this sound from their own training of head voice + is this newly discovered sound the foundation for a strong mix?     disclaimer: volume is quite loud so keep your headphones down: http://picosong.com/L24V/
  12. SlashRock05

    Classical Style to Rock?

    Uhm, hey there! It's been a long time since I opened my acc. in this website, for I'm enjoying my current singing career. So, I'm in a choir right now and I sing baritone or high bass/low tenor. My range for now is G2-G4. I can execute a E2 in a volume of a singer's chest voice. Btw, I've been singing opera lately, (for about 6 months) and I am classified as a baritenor by my instructor. My range in opera was from a brief A2-A#4, 2 octaves and a semitone. Hahaha And I've been wondering if Rock singing could help me extend my voice up to the extent of my cords. I watched videos of connecting the chest to head voice and bringing power towards the passagio. If I could be, somehow, successful in bridging my chest and head in a type of rock way, could I use that in singing classically? Specifically, Bel Canto. That's all my questions now. Hahaha Thanks for the replies in advance.
  13. Hi, this is about my wife. She has not sung a great deal in her life apart from work - she is  a music teacher with B Mus piano.  Started singing a lot more in church. Got a very husky voice, diagnosed with a vocal cyst. This was removed successfully. Had a very slow recovery; then took singing lessons. Now singing without major issues, but has taken to singing everything in her head voice. This naturally gives a different sound. She has fears of damaging her voice again because pushing chest or full voice is something she equates with damage.    I am recording her and would like to see a gradual return of her full voice for some songs or sections. How can she do this correctly? She feels that her break is an issue. Her speaking voice has slowly returned to almost normal since the operation (2 years ago) However I would say it's not the same as it was. There is a very slight husky tone there. Of course this can be good for singing. Just seems for recording that all head voice with her vibrato is not the optimum sound very every song. She is concerned about tuning when using chest voice but I have recordings before the operation and I prefer some of those tracks.   Any advice much appreciated.
  14. folks, if you haven't seen this video and you want to sing "steve perry like" (lighter registration) please check this out. this really was explained in such a way it really hits home. especially if you tend to sing on the heavier side, this is a good watch.
  15. aravindmadis

    Faithfully - Take 2

    I feel I have made some improvements to my singing to post a second take of this song.  I feel like I have more "easy" power in my higher notes and my singing in the passagio has improved from the last time.    This is a very very difficult song for me.  I had to really work on each note and use vowel modifications to sing this song.   I think I made a zillion takes before I felt happy and would never attempt to sing this song live!      The mix I feel is frankly not good at all, but I am really lost on how to improve it.  Any suggestions will be appreciated  
  16. Robert Lunte

    The John Arch Discussion

    Ok... is it only me... or is John Arch one of the coolest, most original sounding rock singers ever?!  I love the way this guy sings. Yes, I know it is a bit "quacky", but he has taken that sound color and made it his signature. He also has these fantastic little vocal riffs... check out the signature John Arch riff at 3:46 - 3:48.. and 3:56... that is "so John Arch".    Anyways... anyone have any thoughts about this cat? Can anyone analyze the intervals of the riff at 3:46 and determine what scale/mode that is coming from because he uses this a lot. It sounds very modal, or middle Eastern sounding.   On "Relentless" below, check out the riff from :51 to :58... so cool!   this is a "signature" sound that John Arch does a lot. Very unique.     Here is a tune with his "Arch/Matheos" project: "Midnight Serenade"     This is also really good: "Relentless"  
  17. Hello all, I come to you with a question that I can't find answered anywhere else in the way I'd like it to be.  I've been singing for a few years now and I am quite happy with my voice.  I have a quite strong chest voice that I am currently stretching into the fourth octave inch by inch. (I am still at the point where I am losing ease and starting to strain by C#4) However, what I strongly desire is to have a beautiful head voice sound that can cover all dynamics from soft and pretty to loud and powerful.  I used to not have any head voice tone whatsoever available to me but about a year back I found I was able to make the smallest strained peep in a head tone around D4 and since then it's been getting easier but still can only phonate at extremely quiet levels.   So, my question is, how does one grow their head voice to get a more resonant tone?  I can sing in head voice comfortably up to E4 at this point and stretch it up to G4 but it's so damn quiet.  What do I have to do to grow this sound so that I have the dynamic control to swell the tone into bigger resonance?  I assumed I just had to keep practicing with it even if it is very quiet but now I am worried that singing so quietly isn't doing anything for the sound's resonance as the volume of my head voice is still just as limited as it was when if first discovered it.  If anyone can give me some reassurance as to how to truly grow the head voice to have strong dynamic control and range I'd most appreciate it.   Here is a clip of what I assume to be my head voice currently sounds like: http://picosong.com/5Zhf/  If I try to increase the volume on this sound at all it turns into crackling noise and cuts out.     Thanks!
  18. I've recently made a concerted effort to lighten the mass of my phonation as I ascend. This has been a HUGE help as I kept getting "stuck" at A#4 and could never get past it to B4 in a light mass configuration.   I have no problem "pulling chest" and getting a more belty, beefy head tone B4 and above; in fact, it was much easier for me to access the notes above A#4 by using more M1 musculature. It allowed me to go up to D5 and even to E5 easier than the light mass way; now after trying to "shed the weight" as I ascend, I've been able to get bright, twangy head tones on B4 and couple of times on C5 as well.   As Robert has said before, the light mass way is MUCH less tiring on the voice, it almost feels effortless but sounds bright and connected. As of now, I can only sustain and "pull" M1 so high for so long before getting fatigued: not straining, as everything feels open and free, but my voice gets tired much easier than compared to the light mass way. Continuing to train the M1 "pull" should provide more stamina so I can utilize it for longer periods of time.   As for the light mass configuration, this is the sound I ultimately want, the James LaBrie/Geoff Tate/Rob Halford way, as opposed to the Bruce Dickinson way. Not that there's anything wrong with Bruce, he's one of my favorites, but it's not the sound color I'm looking for. I'm glad to have found both configurations and will train and utilize both of them.   Moral of the story is if you are looking for a light mass sound color, keep your phonation light and lighten the mass as you ascend. Robert has mentioned this before in his online videos but until I tried applying it yesterday and today, I didn't fully realize how big of a difference it makes. I feel as if my voice just "slots" into the proper place when slightly modifying the vowel and lightening the mass. It's a very delicate configuration.   Just figured I'd share my story and a bit of advice.
  19. My Mom approached me the other day wanting me to teach her. So now i'm giving her free lessons because.... well shes my mom. she is having a super hard time connecting and bridging through her break. I have tried lift up pull back, resonant tracking, mums, bubs, bips, and tons of other exercises to help get her to bridge yet she still either yells the note or switches to the voice she has sung with for 30 years, a breathy falsetto carpenter type voice. Her embouchure and vowel mods are ok I just need to remind her to drop her jaw all the time.    What are some tips to get her into the right placement and to bridge her registers?
  20. cantando

    Thyroid Tilt.

    Any Estill experts here? I've come to realize that the main thing that has been holding me back is that I can't get thyroid tilt to happen in thick folds. I have been trying for a very long time now and nothing seems to work. I can make it happen only in very thin. Someone once brought my attention to the fact that one unmistakable sign that thyroid tilt is happening is that an octave feels extremely small, which is due to the fact that the folds are already pulled tighter and the arytenoids have to move less to reach higher notes. In my thinnest thin, I can make it happen easily, but otherwise, it just doesn't happen no matter how much effortfully I use cry/sob.   Can anyone offer any suggestions on how to get thyroid tilt and thick folds (modal voice) at the same time?
  21. Hi Folks..  This is one of my favorite songs.. I think this song is well within my range, the A4 is not an issue..    I seem to have an issue with the start of the song.. Where it starts with "Can you remember" and again at the point where it says "I am returning" & "A strand of Silver".. I am seemingly sounding like I am shouting and losing integrity of the note.. I am using a mix voice(or as Robert would say a covered head voice) throughout the song.. Please check if you can spot anything and let me know what I can do..    http://vocaroo.com/i/s1hR97EWCNtS http://yourlisten.com/aravind.madhavan.90/perfect-strangersallconverter   Getting a copyright issue with soundcloud so trying a couple of other websites..     
  22. Hello all,   First off, great to see the new TMVW forum up and running. A great new interface!   I was practicing light head tones and I think I ended up figuring out how to transition around B4 and up.   I ended up recording what it sounded like with my phone so the quality's not so great, but the head tone sounds full and twangy. I think it ended up being an E5 (although I'm not sure).   Let me know what you guys think, any feedback is welcome.