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Found 479 results

  1. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  2. Well...Hi Im Jack, Im from Chile, first of all really sorry for my poor english but ok, here we go. Im very confused about my vocal range because I hear that the baritone have a extension of their range aprox. (B2-E4) and the tenor (C3-C5). Well my lowest note is a G#2 and is really very difficult to do, it is more comfortable for me a A2 and my higuest note with my chest voice it is a G4 or F#4, it's depends, some times with a little effor I can sing a A4 with the mixed voice i guess, im not sure it's head voice it all or a mixed voice, I think it's a mixed voice cuz a feel my chest vibrates and it's not so shrill. Finally my Highest note i can sing with my head voice it is a G5 or F#5 and with falsetto some times a D6 but sounds very noisy and ugly. My question is my range vocal only realizes between my chest voice or also it's taken into account my head voice? Oh I forget to say you I love Jeff Buckley and Alex Turner voices. Sorry for my english, sorry for the lenght of the question. Lov U bye Pd: Qualify my english pls
  3. Hi, Im looking for someone able to provide me with a good acapella version of Shout, in the exact style of Otis Day & The Knights. It will be used for a remix; as its gonna be a demo it probably won't be used on the final version. Im basically looking for someone with a "sound-a-like" voice. I would be also extremely thankful to anybody who knows a website where I can find singers for this kind of work... or maybe someone! I'm not looking for some crappy job, I'm paying for the gig of course. Thank you. V.
  4. I have sung soprano in several community choirs, and have a strong voice, a little low for a full soprano role, but accurate (far less accurate and less passionate in lower ranges). I have not picked up confidence for solo singing though because I struggle with timing, so far dealt with by following another strong singer. For the last few years, and the foreseeable future, I am living in a place with no suitable choirs to join But recently, the chance to sing solo has come up, with a pianist, and possibly also accompanied by a guitar and harmonica. This is good, but scary! For my first attempt at singing solo, I am thinking of Sinner Man, a song I have sung in choir and enjoy very much. When I look at the sheet music available, I see it available in different keys. Now, I like sheet music because I can follow the dots up and down, and can get some idea of the timing, but I know nothing of the key. Can anyone advise on how to choose the right key?
  5. Hello, I was wondering if I could get some advice about what range I should be singing in and how to tell which register I'm in. I'm a 27 year old woman; I've been singing my whole life (mostly in private, occasional church choir and school talent show) but recently began to pay more attention to technical aspects. I've done some online reading about techniques like opening the throat, lowering the larynx, and how to switch into head voice, things like that, but I'm still confused about what that actually feels like. I plan to take a few professional lessons when I'm at a point where I can afford it.Using a pitch monitoring app, I found that my natural comfortable speaking pitch is from B3-E4, average C4. Right now I can comfortably sing A3-C5 with extremes at F3 and D5. My best sound is probably F4-B4. I have a light, sweet-sounding, almost childlike quality to my voice, with a similar tone to Jodi Benson as the Little Mermaid. I can easily sing the song Part of Your World in her range, but have trouble going higher than that. I'm not sure how to develop my registers. I recently figured out how to produce bell-like ringing tones with a slight operatic quality while feeling the roof of my mouth vibrate (in the range of F#4 to C5), which I feel like is head voice and is different in quality than when I'm feeling vibrations in my lower throat near my chest. I can sing up to A4, sometimes B4 in what feels like the chest register and the same tonal quality as my lower notes. I only recently began to be able to sing B4-D5 in "head voice" without straining or airiness. I would love to increase my range but I'm not sure whether to focus more on developing the lower or upper range. I've read that even contralto voices are expected to be able to reach D5 or F5 but I have trouble with those notes, and I have nowhere near the vocal weight of Adele for example. I can sing Taylor Swift's usual range fairly well but I have a lighter tone to my voice than she does. I have mostly thought I was more of an alto range singer because of my difficulty with high notes, but I also struggle with having any resonance below A3 to B3. I have also recently paid more attention to diaphragm breathing and I'm improving my breath control. I would greatly appreciate any thoughts about what range I should focus on, and how to develop my head voice and mixed voice. Thank you!
  6. Hi there I often have trouble hitting higher notes during the first song of the set- or first take if recording. From the second song onwards I'm fine with my whole range. I warm up using the Melissa Cross warm up and some lip bubbles. I have tried softly singing in addition to this also, but regardless the first song problem remains (no matter what the song is I will struggle with the upper mid to high notes.) Any advice would be much appreciated, its so frustrating. Thanks !
  7. One of my fave singers from back in the day. Now that I myself am learning to sing id be interested in hearing others opinion or analysis of Lennys style etc. Obviously one of his most famous songs... One of my fave voices even though its a bit feminine lol. I dont dig the sort of quivering vibrato etc. The "scream" at 2:06. Is that any particular technique? Would that be considered a crazy range or just a nice trained voice? The high note at 4:31. Is that whistle register that he tried to hit or just a coincidental "accident"? any opinion of his voice? Any interesting technical points? Im pretty sure he has lost some range etc nowadays Thanks, JonJon
  8. I'm not sure where I should put this as I don't know whether my problems stem from bad vocal technique or pure technical/recording/producing problems. Judas Priest - Painkiller is a typical song to sing, but I've always felt it was a bit too low for me so I pitched it up. I'm still not comfortable singing it, but when listening to the recording my voice sounds very "grounded" (as in: being placed far down in my throat, as opposed high up in my throat). However, the recording sounds worse than what I experienced and heard (with my own ears) when I actually recorded it. But, if you're listening with headphones and really crank up the volume those high frequencies pertained to "placing the voice high up in the throat" start to show up, and it sounds like it felt when I recorded it. It might just be my mic/mic placement as well other non-vocal problems, but it seems weird how such things would make such a big difference, so I feel there must be some vocal-technical issue as well. So, do you have any tips on how I can "lift my voice" from the lower part of the pharynx to the higher part of the pharynx? If that's the right way to go. I might be waaay off! How it sounds: https://soundcloud.com/rednane-kirderf/painkiller-test
  9. I'm a male who has been singing in falsetto almost their whole life. Of course I do sing in chest but I find singing in falsetto more comfortable. So today I was practising and I suddenly had this idea to try singing Emotions by Mariah Carey, so I listened to the song several times to get to understand it better and I was really intrigued with the Whistling parts of the song. So instead of trying to sing then song, I tried finding my whistle register but I was only singing in falsetto the whole time, until I breathed out in between singing and I made a squeak. So I tried focusing on the feeling and I was able tooit very high notes, higher than I thought I could hit. I was concerned whether it was just a really high falsetto but it felt slightly different than a falsetto, instead of feeling the sound coming out from my throat, I could feel vibrations in my head and the sound seemed to be coming from in between the back of my nose and mouth. I was pretty happy with the sound of it so I this time I actually tried singing the song, it sounded okay until I reached the whistling before then chorus and instead of the smooth high sound coming out, a weird falsetto came out instead. After that I went and read about the whistle register and I came upon one where the author of the page talked about how whistling with the wrong technique will damage your voice. I was instantly worried so I came here looking for tips on singing with the whistle register. How do I know I'm actually singing in my whistle register and how to incorporate it into my singing. Thanks im advance !
  10. Hey! I know many people say that the larynx can be raised and lowered for different sounds and effects. But i'm wondering.. is the larynx in the neutral position the 'proper' and perfect placement where sound is created from? Lately I have been going throughout my range at all different volumes and intensities trying to keep my mouth as small as possible. No big, wide 'Ah' vowels or anything. Just a very relaxed mouth without changing the shape.. and just feeling a change in the throat, such as from 'Ah' to 'Ee'. Now when I do a Lip Roll going from a low chest note up to a higher heady note, my larynx stays completely stable. Just in the position that it's in when i'm relaxed and talking comfortably. Should my singing come from the same place as when I do lip rolls, with the stable larynx? I'm trying to get to a stage where I can also Hum all my singing.. soft and powerful with a stable larynx. Humming is quite difficult for me at times because it can cause my larynx to move and tense up but if I Hum when I come off the Lip Roll, it seems to be fine and just feels like the Lip Roll. Then all I need to do is drop my jaw to make a vowel. Oh also.. when I do vocal fry on low and high notes, this keeps my larynx totally stable. I can't seem to make the screamy vocal fry sound if my larynx is slightly too high. I can only make the sound when it is in it's proper place. Remember, this is when i'm not opening my mouth extremely wide, which I think seems to 'force' cord closure. So it makes me think that the stable larynx is the proper and healthiest placement for all notes low and high and at all intensities.
  11. Hi. My head voice is very weak. I hadn't even started to sing in it since a few months ago. I cannot make it very loud. please recommend me some exercises to make my head voice stronger. Thanks I've been doing the goo and nah noises.
  12. I tried to sing "let's Marvin Gaye and Get it on" by Charlie Puth but when the chorus comes He sing like this Charlie Puth - Marvin Gaye (Live) and I sing like this Let's Marvin Gaye and Get it On (cover). His voice sounds like the chest voice while my voice sounds like head voice What am i doing wrong? And how can i fix it?
  13. Hi there, I am having trouble figuring out how to blend chest and head voice while practicing mum, huh and nay on the scales. Does anyone have any advice or techniques that helped them? Any advice is appreciated. Also, do I continue practicing notes that are comfortable for me and eventually it will get higher or should I keep pushing to go higher? Thanks!
  14. Heres a new Video that might help clear up some questions..
  15. Some of you guys have seen earlier preproduction of this tune. Here is the final presentation to you all... hope you enjoy. The Song is a bit about... the morning after. That feeling you get when you did something the previous evening or have been doing something that is fun, but now you have to pay the consequences in the heart. Then freeing yourself from it...
  16. My voice teacher has been telling me that head voice is full voice. We have been working on bridging from chest voice into head voice with no noticeable break and using middle voice to get their. Middle voice acts as a gateway to allow you to switch into head voice without it being so abrupt that head voice sounds like a completely different voice My first question is: is head voice with a connection to chest voice full voice? Meaning it is a light and falsetto like sound without the connection and with the connection it sounds as full as chest voice, meaning you switch into head voice so seamlessly that it creates an auditory illusion to the listener that you are still in chest voice? So above middle voice, it still sounds like the same voice as chest voice, not a light disconnected sound? My second question: what is the difference between singing in a connected head voice and singing in a mix voice? I used to think that head voice was just a light disconnected sound for effect or for female opera singers. My third question: do male opera singers use mixed voice or head voice? Thanks!
  17. Hello, I recently got cast in the role of Katisha in the Mikado. The fun part? I'm a baritone. I found out when auditions were happening that I could hit the F5 required for the part in falsetto, so I tried out and was cast in the role. However, as rehearsals have gone on, my falsetto has gotten weaker and weaker, and in fact my range in chest voice has suffered as well. I think I might be straining my voice too much, though when I'm fully warmed up and singing it feels fine. Today, I can't sing any falsetto at all. I don't know if I just need to rest my voice for a while, or if I need to drop the part. I'm not experiencing any pain, but I'm really worried that I might be damaging my voice, because I definitely have much less stamina in falsetto.
  18. Hi everyone. Lately I've been going out for a run and instead of working my voice out at home with next door neighbors getting annoyed at me, I've been singing in the countryside. I find a quiet spot in the grass after a run and I can just let loose instead of worrying about people hearing me and annoying people. Something that I've noticed is after running for about 20-30 minutes, everything is much easier! Bridging and connecting, not straining, sustaining notes.. it's a whole lot easier. I'm guessing this is to do with the breath from the running. Whilst running i'm taking big breaths in and out. It's great! My voice feels a whole lot better after a run instead of spending minutes doing breathing exercises at home stood still. I also workout my voice when running back too. Each time one of my feet hit the ground, I let sounds out like "Yah", "Hee", "Muh", "Ma", "Hey" and it feels totally fine and released. It's like my voice is going where it wants to go naturally instead of me overthinking things and ending up straining. I just thought I'd mention it. Maybe it will help someone!
  19. Hi guys, In my singing lesson, my teacher tried to get me to sing a song on different keys. She tried to get me to sing the song on a (what sounded like a high key) high key and for some reason, my voice automatically went into my head voice or maybe falsetto. And then when he played a low key for me to sing the song in, i automatically went to a very low chest sound. He wanted me to sing in my own normal voice when singing at that high key but for some reason, my voice just switched and went into a really airry voice.He also mentioned that it seems that for some reason, i have unconsciously told myself when it comes to the high notes of a piano, i have to switch to that airy tone but when it comes to the low notes of the pianio, i should switch to chest. i think i have had this problem for as long as i can remember. It's like i see it as, high notes - only head/falsetto and low notes - only chest. Does anyone know how i can combat this problem? I want to be able to sing the song at the higher keys, he played without unconsciously switching to that airy tone. Thanks!