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Found 465 results

  1. HiIm very nervous because i havent sang infront of an audience before and the song we are gonna perform with my band is this onehttps://soundcloud.com/rms-17/children-of-the-damnedAre there any good techniques you can give me because its a B4 he hits on the chorus and i have to use my head voice to get there?
  2. Okay Folks, Here's something that I came up with while driving home last night. If we really want to understand high notes from all angles and a high note could speak, what would it be asking of the body? What would the voice say to you, if for example, it wanted to produce a big, powerful high note? What is really mentally and physiologically going on when you produce a high note? Do we really know? Should we really know? Let's go into this really deeply. To make this really interesting if you care to reply, do it as if you were the high note, not just provide explanations. Take on the personna of the high note. You are a high note in your body. What are you going to ask of your entire body? Try and be really specific.... I'll begin.....(going in a first-things-first order of requisites): It's a running conversation between you, (Singer) and the High Note. (High Note) "Before we even get started, are you well hydrated, and did you get a good night's rest because if you didn't you're gonna make this much harder than it needs to be." (Singer) "Yes, I'm good. What's next? (High Note)
  3. I have always been envious of singers who have this magical "Once voice" quality in their singing. I am sure that there are many excellent singers in this forum who have that quality. I want to hear from you about your journey, how long it took and what is the one most important thing you would recommend to a rookie in this quest for holy grail!
  4. Hello everyone, I cant thank you enough for your contributions on the forum , although I have to say that sometimes I try to stay away of collecting more information because I need to think easy and I am not that good to take advantage of the information. I just posted a couple of times from what I can remember, and read the forum intermitently. I am not new to singing but you could say I am still a beginner ( it is very frustrating) . I started with SLS and other methods, and took lessons from a variety of teachers (some in the forum) . I could say that my main problem is that when I approach B and middle C I kind of feel that I am going into the critical area and my body wants me to do something. For a while I tried to manipulate and narrow the sound while keeping the same intensity but the sound changed and I was not able to maintain compression and it became airy. I added twang and tried other approaches with not many consistent results. From all I have understood and tried, I feel that if I can solve from middle C# to G my voice is going to reward myself , and I feel it, but I am doubtful of what approach to follow. I have had teachers with a nice voice that advocate for a sooner bridging. Some of them have a light but energetic tone which reminds of a beatlesque, Tim Buckley, Thom Yorke type of voice, which I really like . I hear the mix voice and a pleasant tone in this coordination if done with equilibrium . In my voice it is not so stabile and when I try to put more energy it loses the stability and gets airy. I was told by some teachers, that , to get this light tone, first I have to stablish a more solid and strong middle voice, so the message was to kind of stretch the chest and maintain the coordination. After going back and forth I pursued the more solid chest voice trying to cover more notes before bridging. I dont feel my voice is agile when doing this nor elastic. It kind of gets stuck and loses resonance. I mean I can bridge but with useless tone. I understand the message of pushing the voice a little bit to awaken it but doing it focused it is hard. I think it is hard to tell how much air and energy to carry before the first bridge and the approaching area. I will use some examples, of two great singers and teachers from the forum ,even though I can be completely wrong since I am not an expert , but a passionated obsessed with voice because I need to be able to perform my songs: When I hear Daniel Formica, for example, I hear a focused tone no matter how much energy carries but without the problem of carrying weight to the first bridge. If I do this it is on the verge of being too light for crossing the bridge, but in his voice sounds very alligned . I can also hear the tone being forward which for me helps me more than if I let it fall back . I would like to have this texture, but I recognise that if I many times I pull back a bit when I approach that area, and my voice shows the whiny SLS sound if wrong executed because I do not know how to face it. That is also part of the question. Do i get this whiny sound because of being to light? If I hear Robert Lunte's voice, I hear a more boomy sound with more bottom end, and as far as I understand letting the resonance go to the back of the head while bridging. In my voice that feeling I think it is preventing me from bridging because I cant handle so much weight and singing becomes really hard . I know Robert does not have this problem, but I can't sing like this. In my voice I feel the tongue retract and the resonance goes to the back of the head which gives me less resonance than the forward tone. If I put more energy to avoid the whiny SLSesque sound which my voice projects either gets like a muffled yell or sounds flat. I am comparing these two approachea as an example of the two perspectives and how my voice reacts to them and I am just talking about what I hear, not saying if that is what is really going on as a result of the technique but my interpretation. So one more focused and light edged and the other one boomier with more bottom end with a darker resonance . Question: Do I need a fuller chest in order to later get a more coordinated passagio, and if so , how do you train that way ? Is it twang what can give me that or should be raw chest in a more classical way? I am very confused. I think I should stablish a lower voice that with not much changing allows me to bridge easier without becoming airy. I do not know if I got to say what I wanted, I am not an English native speaker. I pursue a more lighter voice with sharpness in the passagio area and the feeling of a one voice for style and for easyness. Thanks a lot in advance.
  5. A cover I did yesterday. I would appreciate to get some feedback on my technique. - Kasper
  6. A quick attempt at the scream from dream on. I have always had trouble with this but within the last week or 2 it has become very easy!!
  7. Hey all! I'm a big fan of Jorn Lande and I was listening to this song and wondered... what kind of distorsion could he be using on that light note at 00:49 ? Is it common to be able to use distorsion in light mass phonation? I don't know how to use distorsion, and when I have tried to add false cord distorsion to my singing, I can only do it on chest, but I can't for the life of me apply that on headvoice. Also, I can't sing with distorsion, it's uncomfrotable and sometimes has hurt, so I must be doing it very very wrong ( that's why I avoid it, hahah) I really am puzzled as to how can distorsion be achieved at such light coordinations. To people here who can do distorsion effectively, can you do that kind of stuff he does? Is it hard? How does it feel? It seems to me that a lot, if not most, of people can do distorsion intuitively while talking or yelling. All I can do, is the Louis Armstrong voice haha But I feel like that's cheating, because it engages swallowing muscles ( think of Kermit the frog ) and I can't sing a serious song there, haha
  8. Hi guys, Can anyone take a quick listen at this clip and tell me if this really "floaty" or whiny voice is a lack of chest voice strength and/or straying into falsetto, or something else? The song calls for a really light voice but I'm having trouble making a light/flute-y voice without making it sound too "whiny" (like the high-pitched part of yodeling almost). I just need a pointer in the right direction then I can work on improving it. As of now when I listen to it I don't really know what is the root of the problem. https://app.box.com/s/47hummk6r8qj34rh89rzo210tzhgl26q (Sorry the song is not in English as it's the only file I have on hand atm) Thanks.
  9. Introduction In the male voice lower and mid ranges, (what has been traditionally called the "chest voice"), the harmonic structure of the sung tone contains many partials - harmonics, which fit nicely into the pattern of resonances for any particular vowel chosen. Throughout this range, the strong, lower harmonics are reinforced by the first vowel resonance corresponding with Formant 1, (F1), midrange harmonics are reinforced by the second vowel resonance from Formant 2 (F2), and higher harmonics are emphasized by the higher "twang" or "singer's" formant resonances. The combination of multiple, powerful low, midrange, and high harmonics present in all vowels is a distinctive characteristic of this section of the male voice. In contrast with this, in the male high range, (what has been traditionally called the 'head voice'), the harmonics produced by the voice are higher in frequency and more widely spaced. Here, few of the harmonics fit into the vowel resonance pattern. For one particular span of notes in the head voice, there is no significant resonance available to amplify the lowest two harmonics produced. To achieve vocal power and consistency of tone in the high voice, the male singer uses what he has available, "twang" (singer's formant) and the resonance from F2 strengthening harmonic 3 or 4, depending on vowel. Between these two resonance strategies is a region of transition, too high for the 'chest voice' strategy, and too low for the F2 alignments of the 'head voice' strategy. This transition region is the passaggio. Acoustics of the rising fundamental Throughout the voice, as the fundamental frequency moves, the alignment of harmonics and resonances for a vowel changes. On an upward-moving scale or leap, the fundamental and all the overtones rise in frequency. Since the harmonics are spaced at multiples of the fundamental, the harmonics also get farther apart, too. For most of the chest voice range, this is not an issue, as the resonance from F1 covers a wide frequency range, and midrange harmonics are close enough together for at least 2 or 3 of them to get some benefit from F2. These conditions apply to all the vowels. However, in an upward pitch pattern, as the voice passes middle C (C-F, depending on voice type) eventually the scale reaches a region in the voice where the alignment of harmonics to formants is no longer advantageous. Overall vocal power and tone quality will be lost if an adjustment is not made. The particular point in the male voice where this occurs is as the 2nd harmonic passes F1. Visualizing harmonics and the /e/ vowel in a spectragraph As illustration of this, what follows is a series of spectragraphs made with different fundamentals sung to the vowel /e/ (ay), made using my own, baritone, voice. As representative of a lower chest voice tone, the first is of the A natural just a bit more than an octave below middle C , also known as A2. Each vertical blue line represents the intensity of a particular harmonic, where 'up' = louder. Low frequency harmonics start on the left side. The leftmost peak is from the fundamental, and if you look at each peak to the right of that (increasing frequency of harmonic), you can see that the 4th harmonic is the very tallest, and then the peaks become successively shorter. This peak volume for the 4th harmonic, and the emphasis of those surrounding it, is the result of Formant 1, F1 in its position for /e/ in my voice. Harmonics to the 'left' of the formant center get progressively louder as they get nearer to it, and those to the 'right' of the formant center get softer. Proceeding to the right is a section of quite harmonics, not so tall in the display, and then there is another build up to the 13th harmonic. This is the area amplified as a result of the location of Formant 2, F2. The spacing of F1 and F2 is what makes this vowel sound like 'ay' to the listener. After another gap, there are two more areas of emphasis, which are the result of F3 and F4, clustered together. These formants move very little vowel-to-vowel, and form the high frequency 'brightness' resonances of the singer's formant. The reason we start with this: for any given vowel pronunciation, (like /e/) the formants stay at the same locations even while the fundamental (and the associated harmonics) are moved during the production of different notes. Especially important in the understanding of the male passaggio is the relationship of F1, F2 and how the harmonics align with them. A2 on /e/ vowel. Harmonic spacing As mentioned earlier, for any given sung note, harmonics are always the same frequency distance apart. That frequency spacing is the same frequency as the fundamental... the note being sung. So, if a fundamental is 110 cycles per second (like that A2,) all the harmonics will be 110 cycles apart from their neighboring harmonics. You can see this equal spacing in the picture above. Because of the closeness of the harmonic spacing, you are able to see pretty well the 'shape' of the formant regions. Up an Octave The next picture is of the same /e/ vowel, but singing the A up one octave, the A just below middle C, A3, which is 220 cycles per second. Notice that the peaks are farther from each other than in the prior picture... now they are 220 cycles per second apart. Looking at the peaks for a moment, you can see that the amplification effects of F1 and F2 are still in the same place (left to right), but now different numbered harmonics are boosted, and fewer harmonics are affected by each individual formant. In the case of F1, the 3rd harmonic is now the most emphasized, with the 2nd harmonic also getting some help, while F2 is emphasizing the 7th harmonic tremendously, but not much else. This excellent alignment of F2 with a harmonic makes it really ring distinctively, and is an example of 2nd-formant tuning, which will get discussed later. Finding the exact location of F1 for /e/ Are you curious about the exact location of F1? Look at the bottom of this next picture, right beween harmonics 2 and 3. See the blips? All voices have some soft, non-harmonic noise. When that noise falls under a formant, it gets amplified enough to measure. These low blips on the spectragraph are the giveaway to the location of the formant. A3 on /e/ vowel Continuing the scale upward As I continue up the scale from A3, three things happen due to the musical intervals represented by the harmonics: 1) My 2nd harmonic gets closer and closer to F1, strengthing that harmonic. This makes the warmth of the voice 'bloom' in this region, and the resonance makes it possible to oversing some and still get away with it. 2) My 3rd harmonic gets higher above F1, and so it gets progressively softer. In combination with #1, this changes the tone quality somewhat. 3) F2 tunes to successively lower harmonics. These three trends are very important in understanding the male passaggio. More on 'What happens when a harmonic rises above a formant'? As a particular harmonic rises above a formant center, it rapidly decreases in intensity. In this next picture, now singing Bb3 (up just one half step from the A), you can see the effect on the 3rd harmonic. It is quite softer now when compared to the 2nd harmonic. For this note, the principal power of the vowel is being carried by the 2nd harmonic. You may also note that the F2 tuning is emphasizing harmonics 6 and 7 more or less equally. That is because F2 is between them. Harmonic 7 is no longer in the 'ringing' position, and harmonic 6 is not yet high enough to be there. Bb3 /e/ vowel The male upper chest voice My voice is now in the 'fattest' part of the upper chest voice, where most of the vowel power is coming from the 2nd harmonic. This range is just about a perfect 5th wide, because that is the spacing of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics. The region begins as the 3rd harmonic passes F1, and ends as the 2nd harmonic passes F1, in other words, for my /e/ vowel, from the Ab below middle C, to the Eb above middle C. This is what makes my voice a 'low baritone' quality. (Note, you can still see the noise blip.. its getting closer to the 2nd harmonic the higher I sing) Now, the Db in the following picture. Notice that there are little noise blips on each side of the 2nd harmonic. This indicates optimum alignment of the harmonic with F1, the place where the 2nd harmonic is exactly aligned with F1. Db4 /e/ vowel The effects of strong resonance on ease-of-singing Through the entire compass of my voice, up to this point, lower harmonics have been boosted by F1, which has provided for some cushioning effect for the vocal bands. That situation is about to change significantly as the fundamental rises past this point. A very important challenge to the singer as this happens is to resist the temptation to maintain vocal power via pushing. And now to the Eb. The 2nd harmonic has just past F1. Its still very strong, but will lose ground very rapidly as I proceed upward. This is the beginning of the tricky section of the passaggio, where the resonance provided to the 2nd harmonic decreases rapidly, and I must, to retain vocal power and tone quality, find another way to shape the vowel. Eb4 /e/ vowel My next post, 'Male voice passaggio 102' will discuss the various strategies that can be used to retain resonance through the passaggio.
  10. Hello TMV members, I have an issue with my voice, sometimes it just won't thin out/conduct properly. Some days the break seems fluid and I can bridge the (full) voice all the way to an B5, with various mixed shades too. On other days, my voice completely fails apart, and I can't even have the vocal cords conduct an F4. Instead I get screechy distortion and the voice seems kind of dry and harsh, almost as if it was completely stuck in chest mode. It feels like the cords just refused to vibrate where they should. The amount of frustration caused by the issue would make me shout some really angry tones if it was possible given the situation. I wonder if there might be a condition that might cause the issue, which I am not aware of? Like irritated/inflamed vocal cords? This time around the problem was almost certainly caused by a bad cough I am having, but it isn't the first time. I would really appreciate if you guys knew any exercises or anything else that might help. Any information regarding the issue is warmly welcomed! I had to work a lot to eliminate that screechy distortion (or poor conductance) in/above the passaggio, which I am not sure if that's normal either, perhaps some coaches here know. Shame to have the problem re-appear randomly...
  11. Hello All! New to this forum and looking forward to getting to know you all. I was wondering if anyone might be able to explain what Ella Fitzgerald is doing stylistically in certain parts of "Night and Day" (video provided). At 51 seconds, the "are" in "you are the one" and then again at 1 minute 0 secs, the second half of "under" in the line "and under the sun". I hear it a lot in Ella's recordings. It's subtle but I love the effect. Does it have something to do with using the vocal shift from chest to head voice? How does one develop that technique? Any help would be much appreciated !! .
  12. Hi! For the ones that are new to my name, I am Francis. 15 years of age. i like singing classical, rnb and opera. Maybe some rock too. It's been a long time since I last posted and I was like a newbie way back then. And I am coming back with a song of G. Puccini popularized by Luciano Pavarotti. This is Nessun Dorma. http://picosong.com/Sbbw I had a break somewhere at "Il nome mio nessun sapra" and I really want to ask about that. First, about what the title says. What resonation am I using? Is it chest, head, or mixing? WARNING: The very first part of the clip where I was speaking is very soft. The singing part is VERY loud. So, I recommend turning down the volume for the part after "Here it goes". And, is this proper or not? Do I need to address something first before continuing and finishing the song? All replies will be appreciated. Thanks in advance! -Slash
  13. WHAT THE HELL IS A "SNILE"? I have formulated a new idea this morning that is great... I share with thee... This is a technique that is used to help train singing through narrowed vowels and improving the articulation of your lyrics when singing high. This technique is also great for resonating to forward positions and amplifying the "cup" of the hard palette. A snile is a cross between a sneer and a smile. It is used in singing to help narrow singing vowels to maintain intrinsic musculature support and stability with amplification, when singing pop / rock music above the passaggio. Mastery of The SNILE will greatly train your kinesthetic feel for narrowing vowels, resonating forward into an "edgier" position, and amplifying while keeping acoustic mass low and balanced. "THE SNILE" is characterized by: A lifting of the upper lip to expose the forward teeth of the embouchure.A "narrowing" of the embouchure, to prevent "splatting".A very strong, amplified, forward resonant position in the "cup" of the hard palette and "edgey pings" off the forward teeth.Must have dampened larynx or anchoring of the larynx. Notice How Geddy Lee of the prog. band, RUSH tracks "Limelight" through the "SNILE"! Who said that "FREE" Secret Tips Didn't Exist?! TRY "THE SNILE" NOW!! ... and post your results here! Video demonstration on "THE SNILE" coming soon... "THE SNILE" is just one idea and technique. It is not a "global" solution for all things singing... it you want to get a feel for forward resonance and narrowing, it is good for that. It can also help you to sing very accurately with great intonation and articulation.
  14. So is that possible by nature or it is just a goodtehnique?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6uexPmL0fk
  15. Hi guys, I'm super new here and I thought i'd start a classical technique thread since no one has seemed to have posted in this sub-forum yet. I'll start with posting a little something I've done. SHOW AND TELL !!!!!!! This was from a few weeks ago. I need to work on my breathing near the end. https://soundcloud.com/arfoo/nessun-dorma-rehearsal
  16. "Listen" is οne of four new songs written for the feature version of Dreamgirls (originally a 1981 Broadway musical). Ιt's lyrics make reference to tenacity, love, the refusal to defer dreams and finally rise towards fame.In the film version of Dreamgirls, Knowles portrays the character of Deena Jones, a pop singer loosely based on Motown star Diana Ross. The story explores the life of The Dreamettes (based on The Supremes), a fictional 1960s group of three female singers,whose manager Curtis Taylor (based on Berry Gordy and played by Jamie Foxx) manipulates their personal and professional relationships.I Hope you Enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Video Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovolosPianoAikaterini DeliyiannidouBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisKeyboards: Kleanthis KonstantinidisDrums: Fotis Yiannopoulos
  17. "Je T'aime" : is a romantic French-pop ballad of Lara Fabian, included in the album “Pure” (1996), Lara Fabian is a multilingual Belgian, Canadian lyric soprano had sung songs in French, Italian, Spanish, and English, Portuguese, Hebrew and Greek.The song expresses the love and pain that a woman feels for her beloved!I Hope you enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Composition - Lyrics: Lara Fabian & Rick AlisonVideo Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovoDrums: Fotis YiannopoulosBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisPiano: Aikaterini DeliyiannidouKeyboards: Kleanthis Konstantinidis
  18. For a long time, I have been practicing to have similar technique to this vocalist. Mind you, I do not wish to sound exactly like him, I know that's not possible, but I would like to better understand his techniques and vocal flexibility. Over the past five years, I have accomplished his range and some use of techniques, but as you will hear in the recording at the bottom, my formant and vocal flexibility are lack luster. This has been hard to fix for me. Part of my formant problem is me finding the spaces in my voice where I sound my best. And, due to imperfect technique, I get tired very quickly. This is the song I am singing. Below is the same song with me singing over it. You should be able to hear it pretty clearly, how much voice doesn't quite have the same overtones, yet, it seems like our vocal tones are within the same ballpark. You can hear my voice get so, so tired after a while. Sometimes I sound mouthy and muddled whenever I feel like I sound so much brighter or warmer. I am unsure of what to be looking for. I want to be a performer. This doesn't sound very healthy to me. Please help me to understand where my voice needs to be worked on. Thank you.
  19. Hi Folks.. I used to have major issues in both these songs.. They cut across my passagio and I always was unsure about the right vocal weight for these songs.. I had major issues in transitioning from a comfortable low-med range to the high notes above my passagio. It has taken a long time for me to reach this level and I am in general happy about the outcome for now. Obviously, there is always scope to improve As always, any tips suggestions on improvement are welcome... PS: Now that I have heard these songs, I think I know what other members have pointed out about a slightly cartoonish tone. I am beginning to hear the places where this happens(think this is because of the laziness in focusing on the "easier" notes). Goo goo dolls(IRIS) - https://app.box.com/s/evfe0j10ho0fnlurxpi96v4maa2jdy36 Have you really loved a woman - https://app.box.com/s/zcbtbvgpx320yhighu8nhx592myeg36d
  20. I thought it was awesome so I posted it here to brag. Anyways.... is there anything you guys recommend me doing to make it better? http://vocaroo.com/i/s0fyCH3oqtVe
  21. Hello forum, My name's Ross and I have been interested in learning to sing for some time, but due to residential constraints (I'm at university here in the UK) I've never had the space to practice and neither the confidence to practice. Saturday I move into my new place with my best friend and there's only us two so I thought this would be the perfect time to begin. I'm not really looking to become the next big thing or join a band, it's more of a wind down activity to keep me occupied in between my studies. I have watched a number of videos online, but not really came across much for an absolute beginner. I've read and watched much on the importance of singing from the diaphragm and I know I can breathe efficiently from the diaphragm as It's a way to control anxiety. Cost is an issue, I don't get much in terms of a loan or grant so paying for tuition could be difficult. But I'm stuck as to where to really begin and that's why I have started this thread, if anyone has any tips or directions it would be a great help. I do appreciate that this is a fairly vague post, so please ask any further questions as I don't really know where to begin or how to give you an idea of what I can and can't do. Kind regards, Ross.
  22. hi guys i have couple for problems.Please help me guys 1.Recently i found my headvoice i can feel the buzz in my nasal cavity and also around head area but it sounds girls why??? will it gradually be more powerful as it train? 2.My voice changes its tone when move from chest to head why does it happen?what excercise should i do and how to smooth it ? or should let my voice break so that it changes over time?? 3.While doing wee wee excercise i can really sing high notes but i cant transalate it to my singing because when i sing i can only sing less higher notes why?will it gradually change as i practice?? 4.what excercises do you suggest for chest to head connection? I am really sorry that this post is long its because i have no one to ask to and what to search . I would like to get some suggestions and i want it really bad plz help me Thank you