Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'home recording'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WELCOME & HOW TO GET STARTED!
    • Welcome New Members!
  • SINGING & TRAINING TECHNIQUES
    • General Discussions
  • REVIEW MY SINGING
  • VOCAL GEAR
    • Microphones
    • Recording For Singers
    • Vocal Effects / Processing
  • SEEKING VOCALIST / VOCALIST AVAILABLE
    • Seeking Vocalist / Vocalist Available
  • ARTICLES / GEAR REVIEWS / INTERVIEWS
    • Vocal Gear Reviews
    • Singing Articles
    • Expert Interviews

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Singing Reviews, Programs & Lessons
  • Microphones (Live & Recording)
  • Vocal Pedals (Effects)
  • Home Recording Gear
  • Services For Singers
  • Singing Applications
  • Vocal Health Products
  • TMV World Exclusive Interviews

Categories

  • Product Reviews
  • Articles
  • Interviews

Product Groups

  • UNLIMITED SINGING REVIEWS
  • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
  • SINGERS TEA & INHALER

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Web Site URL


Phone


How did you hear about TMV World?

Found 65 results

  1. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. View full articles
  2. Hi all! I was thinking of doing some recordings to put on Youtube, but I am a complete novice to recording - all I have is a 10 dollar mic I picked up at my local hardware shop. Needless to say it doesn't exactly record very well. What would I need to make a decent/semi-decent recording? I'm just doing this as a hobbyist so my budget is not much, perhaps in the 100-200 dollar range. A problem that I encounter with just using a mic is making sure I can record both the sound coming from my speakers and my voice as well. Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks in advance!
  3. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS *JJP VOCALS *EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNELMASARATI VX1 *BUTCH VIG VOCALS *VOCAL RIDER *HR REVERBHR ECHOREAL ADTAPHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITERWAVES TUNEWAVES TUNE LTDOUBLER *DEBREATHDeEsserVITAMIN *RENAISSANCE VOXTHE KING'S MICROPHONESAND A LOT MORE...!* Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools.A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite.A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2Pearlman MicrophonesSee The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s.See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience.A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.
  4. Hey guys! I always wanted to learn how to harmonize and sing thirds! My friends who kinda knows theory but does not sing say to me that i do harmonize properly but i always do fourth's and not thirds. Here is a clip of me trying to sing thirds. Is that it?? If not do you know how can i practice this? https://app.box.com/s/7qnvanmicn1vaiokq4f4mbsvfi69sp2t NOTE: Pls dont review singing hahaha i did this 10 min ago just to show you if the notes are "relatively" correct... I broke on a few places cuz i wanted to use a light mass and it goes to A4 so thats kinda tricky for me P.s. it lasts 3min but i only sing first part for like 50sec
  5. HOME RECORDING BASICS - A FOUNDATION FROM WHICH TO START!   THE DAVID LYON SET-UP.     When it comes to recording any instrument, people always get way too caught up in gadgets. This is especially true of recording vocals, especially for do-it-yourself recording studios. People tend to think that a better gadget will always translate into a better recording, which occasionally is true, but rarely. Yes, the better tools and equipment do have certain advantages, but you shouldn't bother proceeding to buy (and potentially wasting your money on) the more expensive recording stuff until *AFTER* you have first mastered the basics of recording, because otherwise it won't really make much (if any) improvement in your recordings. My current vocal recording & mixing setup:   -- Dell Latitude E6420 laptop (almost 3 years old, Windows 7 Pro 64-bit, Intel Core i5-2520M 2.5 GHz CPU, 4 GB RAM - In other words, nothing fancy or special) -- M-Audio FastTrack USB 2 (the cheapest DI that I could find at the time, less than $99) -- AKG Perception 120 condenser mic (a good quality mic, but also inexpensive at $99) -- Livewire Advantage 5' XLR microphone cable ($15) -- A cheap pop screen ($10?) -- A cheap tripod microphone boom stand ($20?) -- Reaper 32-bit DAW (Free if you want, I chose to support them, cost $60. I stuck with 32-bit Reaper even though I have 64 bit Windows, because more plugins are available for 32 than 64 bit) -- Audio Technica ATH-M50 headphones (About $150. Don't buy the curly cord, get the straight cord!) -- A folding card table to set my laptop and M-Audio interface on. -- My basement family room (completely untreated - basic carpet, some couches, a TV on the wall, a cat weaving between my feet, etc.) That's it! What DOESN'T really matter:   1) Mac vs PC is mostly irrelevant. Digital is digital, so mixing and recording on a Mac vs PC is merely a matter of user interface preference, not results. I've personally found that Mac is the most "popular" platform recommended by musicians, but that Windows is the most "functional" platform that has the most plugins and recording/mixing software available for it. So I use Windows because I get more software options (plus it's much cheaper than Mac). 2) Condenser vs. Dynamic / Cardoid vs. Super-Cardoid / etc... is also mostly irrelevant. Actually these do matter a little bit, but not really for a beginner recording engineer. Different microphones will definitely have different "warmth" and "character", and also different sweet spots, but usually the difference is quite minor and very subjective. Just start out with a good quality mic and use it A LOT until you really know its quirks, strengths and weaknesses. Getting to know a mic is like making a good friend - it takes a lot of time together to really know it. Over time, you can begin to work your way into other mics as you begin to learn the subtle nuances of each different mic. What DOES matter when studio recording:   1) Nothing replaces a good performance. Bad vocals recorded in a world-class professional studio are still bad vocals. Relax, have fun, and let your experience and training take the lead. 2) NO CLIPPING! If your microphone is clipping, you either have the gain turned up too high, or you are using the microphone incorrectly, or it's a sh*t/broken microphone that needs to be replaced. Every microphone has a "sweet spot", which will differ depending on the microphone and how loud you sing. Do some experimentation to find your microphone's sweet spot. Keep experimenting until you can record your vocals cleanly at about 60-70% max. In a modern digital recording and mixing environment, there is ABSOLUTELY NO advantage to recording at or near clip! That's an old paradigm from the analog recording days when the tape imparted some "hiss" moving over the heads, which no longer applies when recording and mixing digitally. So, record your tracks normalized to about 60-70% (leave lots of head room), and then adjust volumes to blend properly during the mixing phase, and worry about normalizing only for your master track after it's all said and done with mixing. 3) Use a microphone stand. Using a mic stand helps you keep your mouth in the microphone's sweet spot, and also creates a more consistent recording volume floor. It also eliminates extra noise created by bumping or holding the microphone, plus you can't really use a pop screen without a mic stand. When recording, to control volume for vocal dynamics (like when you're going to shift from a quieter to a significantly louder vocal projection, or vice versa), move your mouth, not the microphone (you can see me doing this on many of my videos, like SOAD - Toxicity). 4) Use a pop screen. This will help reduce the harshness and wind-blow noise from "plosives" - like "B", "F", "P", "T", etc. It can also serve as a convenient visual cue for where to place your mouth to stay in the microphone's sweet spot. Pop screens don't help much as a de-esser, but that's pretty easy to fix in mixing with some fairly simple EQ-ing or plugins. 5) Shut down any unnecessary applications or services on your laptop/workstation when recording. Maybe also temporarily disable Anti-Virus scanners if yours is processor heavy (many are). Definitely shut off email and browsers - you don't want those distractions anyway while recording. 6) Do multiple takes. I'm typically better on my 3-6th take than I am on the earlier takes (warmer, more relaxed, more familiar with what I'm going to do vocally, etc.). Tracks are free in your DAW, so don't be cheap! Make a new track for each new take, and save your work often. 7) Take your time. You are recording at home. It's not like you have to pay per hour for the studio or a recording engineer. If your voice just isn't cooperating with you today, come back and try again later today or tomorrow. 8) Avoid wireless microphones for recording. The conversion and transmission of a wireless signal, even on a really expensive high-quality wireless system, still results in lost fidelity. Use a good quality microphone cable (shorter is better) plugged directly into the mic and the DI. 9) Record tracks DRY with no effects! You can add all the crazy effects your heart could ever desire after the fact during the mixing process. By recording dry, raw tracks, you have unlimited flexibility to mix and add effects to it any way you want in the future. 10) Really, REALLY study and learn how to mix! This is a lifetime achievement goal, one you will definitely not master overnight, if ever... But the more you study, the more tutorials you watch on YouTube, the more real mixing you do, the better you will get at it. Learn what kinds (and what settings) of reverb or compression plugins sound best for your voice in different scenarios. Learn when and how to use a delay or a chorus plugin. Learn how to do doubling and layering of multiple takes. It all takes time, but the more you do it, the better you'll get at it. Those are the basics! Good luck!   Check out my videos on YouTube and Facebook, especially the more recent ones. I hope you'll see that a good quality recording can be made using very basic equipment. In fact, maybe check out some of my older recordings too, because the difference of recording and mixing experience becomes very clear when compared to my newer ones (my recording setup has stayed exactly the same, but my mixing experience continues to develop). I hope this is helpful! -- Dave     Some extra info: HOW TO AVOID CLIPPING:   1) Use a DAW to do your recording and monitoring. Reaper is a perfect one to start with because it's free, and it's probably perfect to stick with forever because it is as good (or maybe better) than almost any other DAW on the market (including ProTools, Studio One, Audacity, etc.). 2) Basically all decent USB Direct Interface ("DI") boxes have at least a Gain knob for the microphone, a master (headphone) volume knob, a Direct Monitoring switch, and a Phantom Power switch. Don't buy a DI for vocals that doesn't have at least these minimum requirements. 3) Plug your microphone and earphones into the DI. Turn ON the Direct Monitoring switch (this way the DI will send your microphone back to the earphones, so you can hear what you're singing, with zero delay). If you have a Dynamic mic, leave the phantom power OFF. If you have a Condenser mic, turn phantom power ON. 4) Launch your DAW, and create a test track to set your volume levels. Set the vocal recording test track to MUTE - you are already monitoring your voice via the DI's direct monitoring, so turn off feedback from the DAW because it will be slightly delayed. Sing into the microphone and watch the recording level indicator in the DAW. Adjust the gain knob on the DI until the recording level tops out at about 60-70% in the DAW (just barely above the "green" and into the "yellow", absolutely NO "red"!). IMPORTANT!! ONCE YOU HAVE BEGUN RECORDING, DON'T TOUCH THE GAIN KNOB AGAIN FOR THE REST OF YOUR RECORDING SESSION, EXCEPT IF YOU FIND YOU ARE CLIPPING!!! 5) Import your instrumental music track (the song that you'll be singing/recording along with) into the DAW. It is critical to import the track into the recording session. Don't try to play it in one program while you record in a different program, or you will end up with lots of sync problems when you try to mix. Now, here's the magic, how you hear yourself while recording, without the microphone clipping. Remember, DO NOT TOUCH THE MICROPHONE GAIN KNOB!! 6) Start playing back the song from the DAW, and start singing along to it. Listen to your earphones. If your voice is too quiet, turn UP the master (headphone) volume knob (but *NOT* the microphone gain knob!!) on the DI box. If that makes the music too loud, turn DOWN either the master volume or the instrument track's volume in the DAW! Keep tweaking these two settings until you are able to hear yourself and the music at the same time at a reasonable volume. If you have done all of this correctly, you should now be able to hear both your own voice, and the music track in the earphones at adequate levels; and you should be able to sing as loud (or quiet) as you need to for the song, with the maximum volume in your vocal recording track maxing out at about 70% (nowhere near clip, just barely into the "yellow" area of the level meter, a little bit above "green"). There is (of course) more to it than just that, but that is the basic starting point from which to begin.
  6. 2015 UPDATE, how I sing after a whole year of practice, I think its getting there! Hello fellow singers! As you can see I am new to this forum and from a quick look I notice it has nice activity. I felt the need to write my experience, it is a long one and I wanted to share, it may help some people and people who will read this (if you have the patience and you want to kill some time) may help me with their own insight and knowledge. Little things about me: (you can skip that part and read below the juicy stuff) Im from Greece (so excuse my grammatical mistakes), I sing since I was a kid, opera and pop music (in English language, never Greek, and somehow I don;t have an accent, I have been told this by many people, so i assume it must be true, my talking voice has an accent). My very first singer I was singing along, was Nana Mouskouri, when I was 5-6 years old, then at the age of 13-14 years old and after, I fall in love with Malin Bergreen from Ace of Base (you have to admit her voice is hypnotic), Maria Callas, Mariah Carey, Janis Joplin (because of her I got nodules, I don;t recommend her as a singing model, but she is always in my heart as one of the best singers ever been recorded, I don;t sing with her anymore, I just listen) , Donna Summer and Linda Perry. My strongest vocal ability is opera, it comes to me naturally and without an effort. I had teachers who were impressed with my abilities and I was able to do hard things which I learn by myself and I had teachers who dislike the way I was singing, maybe because the way I was mimicking Callas technique some teachers don;t agree or like it, BUT before you jump to conclusions, after a long research I came to the conclusion that Callas technique was perfect, and I never had any problems with my voice "mimicking" that type of sound. Unlike pop singing which it was always a struggle for me. My observations about healthy singing and my recovery from Vocal Nodules and my experience with various of teachers. (who unfortunately it is a negative one with very few teachers to actually be able to make my voice to come out without an effort.) It was dark times for me when I realize I had nodules, worst period of my life. I used to sing like Joplin, I use to work in night clubs and I was smoking. If you want to kill your voice or your singing career, dreams and get deep into depression, thats the way to do it. I stop singing for a long period of time and thank god my voice heal and im able again to sing and dream. Bel Canto Technique, after a long research and various teachers, it is the only technique that makes my voice to be released without effort and to produce a round full sound. There is an amazing teacher in New York, Bel Canto Teacher, who I did few lessons and she did miracles to my voice, unfortunately she was for my pocket pricy back then, 100 dollars per lesson, but she worth every single penny, especially if you are serious about singing, someone should make some type of investment. If people are telling you that Bel Canto tries to make your voice to sound lighter, or it is only for opera singing, it is a huge misconception! Run away from such teacher. Bel Canto technique brings out the real voice and enhances rich sound no matter what you are, from soprano to mezzo to contralto. if your voice is naturally heavy or thin, a teacher should be able to respect it and teach you according to the nature of your voice. From lesson one, doing Oh, dropping the jaw, I relaxed and I bring the voice out from the diaphragm, after few attempts I produce a sound almost like a tenor. I think it was an F3, my range is from E3-G6. I am dramatic soprano. After few exercises, I was producing a great quality sound. But like I said, I was struggling with money, I move out from NY and life got the best of me for awhile plus I had nodules already when I started with that teacher, the worst timing in the history of any artist. So 2 months ago after my long recovery, I wanted to start lessons again and maybe pursue a career as well, I also write music and I want to give a serious try as an original artist. Because of my location and lack of teachers at the city I live, I thought to try some skype lessons. That was my worst experience! I took some skype lessons with a teacher who claims to teach bel canto and he was trying to make my lower register thinner. He was always telling me to sing quietly and thinner. I did with him 4 lessons, at the 4rth lesson when I attempt to sing the aria he gave me to study, my voice hurt right away with his technique. Keep in mind that I was preparing the aria for almost 2 weeks and because I remember the way the previous teacher was telling me to produce the sound, I was doing this and my voice didn;t hurt at all. And of course i was very happy for it. But I stop the lessons right away. There is a difference between singing relaxed and quietly, and someone to try to force you to sing "lighter", If someone "forces" ones voice to be too quiet or thinner, depends how you try to produce that sound, it actually may hurt! My second skype teacher she also claimed she knows bel canto and that she can teach me to sing healthy with a full voice. We did an hour and half, we did relaxing neck exercises and talking about stuff and some vocalizes and my voice was hurting for 2 days. She even dare to claim that it was natural and it was ok for the voice to hurt! AVOID, RUN from such teachers! don;t even take the time to explain yourself or to complain, close the skype or the door behind you and NEVER LOOK BACK! My biggest question was, what happen to good old classical exercises? Marchesi, Garcia, Boboni and others? I struggle much worst trying to position my mouth like beaver (literally that what she was telling me) while I try to hit the voice at my teeth and some weird stuff, then singing a simple Oh. So after my 2 attempts to find a decent teacher and the lack of teachers at the area I live, I started doing some things on my own and I decided that no teacher will ever make you learn your own instrument unless I myself start learning with proper education my own instrument, and I have very satisfying results. Of course a good teacher will guide you much faster. Because of my range and my strong chest register, i start my exercises from E3 with humming and I build up. I do the yawn position in Ohs and lip rolls. I notice much better results starting from that low, than starting my exercises from the middle C. Then I do "Hungeee" and then I use Marchesi's exercises which they are very melodic and very pleasant to do with all vowels. I don;t play piano myself, I use Finale notation and I play them from there. Very helpful tool! The reason why I choose Marchesi's exercises, is because I doubt just doing hungee's and lip rolls really builds a voice or teaches you how to sing. I believe such type of exercises are a secondary tool to keep you on track how to position the voice and or to relax the voice. Things that I DON"T DO: when I do the exercises or i sing, if I feel the slightest of strain, I stop and I keep my focus to find again the proper position for the voice to come out without an effort. When I try to feel my soft palette to rise, my throat to open, my neck muscles to be relaxed, I know its right because it doesn;'t hurt going low or high, the sound that I produce is clear, full, with healthy vibrato. I record myself when I do the exercises and when I sing, it helps me keep a track of my progress and I can hear the sound. When I hear that my voice sounds muddy, that means that my vocal cords are tired or I use wrong placement. Anything that sounds weird or out of place, I stop that voice placement right away. So far, I get tired after an hour or even 2 hours of singing or exercising. Of course it is not continuously, and when I say "tired", I mostly mean that my body gets little tired, like it tells me, "ok we had enough, time to stop now and to relax". I feel no pain, no strain, and the next day Im ready again to do my exercises. With this Bel Canto yawn technique, and all the above that I mentioned, Im able to hit notes above G6, but not melodic yet and i don;t really use them often, rarely until i build a stronger voice, and today I started a new exercise that will help my head register better. Doing WOO like a siren but very soft, like when we were kids without the intense screaming part. After my personal experience and the way I started educating myself about vocal health, I also notice Mariah Carey's Singing. I want to write this because there are so many people out there advertising her 5 octave range and how to sing like her. Im sure many of us would love to sing like that and sound like her. But even from her earlier songs, I can hear now the strain and the force she uses at her middle and upper register. At her earlier singing she is not effortless at all, if someone pays attention, she does struggle slightly with her middle register to produce a full sound and she sings many times using throat muscles to produce that clear bright sound which causes a lot of strain. I know this because I used to do it also. Another thing that I notice, is that on most of her songs, she uses the high register of her voice a lot and she belts non stop. No matter the technique, the quality of the voice etc... someone cannot run the Marathon everyday. I mean surely people can try it and they might be able to run it for a few days, but after awhile they will need to rest for a long period of time. I don;t know if she is a real soprano or mezzo or alto, what i know is what she did, trying to run the marathon like that, she completely blown away her vocal cords and now she sings always at her low register. Glutathione: I read this article: http://www.holisticprimarycare.net/topics/topics-a-g/functional-medicine/1473-glutathione-shots-reverse-vocal-cord-polypsquickly.html basically what is says is, that the vocal cords are filled with Glutathione, and if you have vocal nodules it may help a lot to reduce them significantly, but if your voice is already healthy, eating foods that boosts or contains glutathione, it may even help to prevent nodules or other bad stuff and coat the vocal cords a lot! Food that boosts glutathione levels: http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Sources-That-Boost-Glutathione-Naturally&id=1177 http://www.livestrong.com/article/335859-food-sources-of-glutathione/ I guess thats why people use to say to eat a raw egg is good for the voice! But don;t eat raw eggs from the market today, seriously, the last years companies have poisoned so much everything and all those diseases that I m not sure if its good anymore. Yoga and Belly Dance Belly dance help me a lot with my diaphragm, it is a great form of dancing and yoga takes my breath to another level. Both have help me a lot to sing stronger and better. So thats all from me. Thank you for reading and if you want to add your own techniques please do, I would love to read it.:)
  7. A really great deal on Nectar 2, an awesome plugin for your DAW... https://www.izotope.com/en/products/mixing-mastering/nectar/?&utm_medium=Email&utm_source=MailChimp&utm_campaign=2015-05+Nectar+2&utm_content=Nectar+2+Non+Owners
  8. I wanted to share this, since I am doing more and more recording these days... thought I would share what Im learning and using.   It has taken me some time and trial and error, and private lessons from a producer to get a great home recording chain going. Here is what I use to track all my vocals and comp., prior to being mixed at a professional studio with a console.  Let me know if you have any questions.     You can get most of this gear at Amazon.com if you run a search at top right of the web site, or click on The Vocal Gear Store.      Microphones:   Pearlman TM2 (Tube Mic) - 1st Choice RODE K2 RODE NT1 RODE NT1A Electro Voice Cardinal   Headphones:   Extreme Isolation - X-29s   PreAmps:   Focusrite ISA One   Universal Audio 701 Infinity     Interface:   Focusrite Scarlett 18i8 (Love this, its great!)     DAW:   Logic Pro X 10     Plugins:   Focusrite Plug-In Suite (comes with the above mentioned interface, good value!)   From www.waves.com   - Vocal Rider - Doubler - Vocal Series Suite  - Vitamin   From Izotope   - iZotope Nector 2
  9. Hello all,   I sometimes try to record vocal exercises with my TC-Helicon MP-75 plugged into the Mic Mechanic pedal, then into my Asus Xonar Essence STX sound card.   However, whenever doing so, I get distortion and clipping if I sing too loudly. I have tried the recording without the Mic Mechanic pedal but I still get this issue,   How do you plug your mics into your computers? Do I need a Digital Interface?   Thanks!
  10. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. THE VOCALIST GIG BAG TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY FOR SINGERS: FROM ROBERT LUNTE & THE VOCALIST STUDIO: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD TVS VOCALIST'S GIG BAG VIDEO OR WATCH BELOW! Microphones: - RODE M1 - RODE M2 http://www.rode.com/ - Electro-Voice 767a http://www.electrovoice.com - HEIL PR-35 http://www.heilsound.com - Telefunken M-80 http://www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com - Sennheiser 935 http://www.sennheiserusa.com - TC-Helicon MP-75 http://www.tc-helicon.com - AKG D7 http://www.akg.com Processing: TC-Helicon VoiceTone Pedals http://www.tc-helicon.com/voicetone-create-xt.asp - Create (EFX) - Doubler (simulates studio doubling) - Correct (compression) - Singles Pedals Wireless Microphone Solution - Samson Airline 77 http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=2018 Check That Mic Sanitary Wipes for Microphones http://www.checkthatmic.com VocoPro (HERO – RV) For Practicing and Writing: http://www.vocopro.com/products/product_info.php?ID=649 Extreme Isolation Headphones – X-29s: http://www.extremeheadphones.com/ex-29.html Vishudda Singer's Tea: http://aromatherapyinhaler.net/product/vishudda-singers-tea-kit-2/ Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS Series): http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_voicerecorders.asp Etymotic Ear Protection for Singers http://www.etymotic.com Hercules Mic Stand: http://www.herculesstands.com/mics/micstands.html PocketTone Pitch Pipe: www.PocketTones.com *Add this code to save $1. Special TVS Deal! (TMV08pt) Lyric Writing Software: www.masterwriter.com *Add this code to save $20. Special TVS Deal! (3059) Pen & Paper: Binder with all your bed tracks & lyrics: View full articles
  11. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. THE VOCALIST GIG BAG TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY FOR SINGERS: FROM ROBERT LUNTE & THE VOCALIST STUDIO: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD TVS VOCALIST'S GIG BAG VIDEO OR WATCH BELOW! Microphones: - RODE M1 - RODE M2 http://www.rode.com/ - Electro-Voice 767a http://www.electrovoice.com - HEIL PR-35 http://www.heilsound.com - Telefunken M-80 http://www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com - Sennheiser 935 http://www.sennheiserusa.com - TC-Helicon MP-75 http://www.tc-helicon.com - AKG D7 http://www.akg.com Processing: TC-Helicon VoiceTone Pedals http://www.tc-helicon.com/voicetone-create-xt.asp - Create (EFX) - Doubler (simulates studio doubling) - Correct (compression) - Singles Pedals Wireless Microphone Solution - Samson Airline 77 http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=2018 Check That Mic Sanitary Wipes for Microphones http://www.checkthatmic.com VocoPro (HERO – RV) For Practicing and Writing: http://www.vocopro.com/products/product_info.php?ID=649 Extreme Isolation Headphones – X-29s: http://www.extremeheadphones.com/ex-29.html Vishudda Singer's Tea: http://aromatherapyinhaler.net/product/vishudda-singers-tea-kit-2/ Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS Series): http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_voicerecorders.asp Etymotic Ear Protection for Singers http://www.etymotic.com Hercules Mic Stand: http://www.herculesstands.com/mics/micstands.html PocketTone Pitch Pipe: www.PocketTones.com *Add this code to save $1. Special TVS Deal! (TMV08pt) Lyric Writing Software: www.masterwriter.com *Add this code to save $20. Special TVS Deal! (3059) Pen & Paper: Binder with all your bed tracks & lyrics:
  12. The TMV World Vocal Gear Recommendations! This forum is designed to capture recommendations from the members of The Modern Vocalist World regarding vocal gear. Please share with the community your top recommendations regarding microphones, vocal effects, vocal pedals, home recording gear, DAWs, vocal health products and any other products and services that would be of interest for this singing community. Recommendations from the community will then be added to the customer built, TMV Vocal Gear Store. The Vocal Gear Store will save you time because all the products have been tried and tested by the TMV World Membership. Those that post and share their recommendations, we thank you for your time and contributions. Visit The Vocal Gear Store!
  13. A large part of vocal training involves learning vocal control. Without vocal control, any vocal recording will suffer dreadfully. With it, you can do things you can only dream about without it. Another problem with lack of control is that if you are singing with any degree of power, you are going to experience a lot more vocal fatigue and risk damage to your instrument if you sing too long. With it, you can sing all day and not experience vocal strain. Yes, it's true! And a lack of control will cause you and your recording team frustration, or you'll just give up and settle for the best you and they think you can do. Usually, it's a huge waste of time and resources. Live performances are more forgiving of slight control issues, but studio singing requires surgically accurate control. So what am I talking about? For a great recording, you need vocal technique skills that will enable you to: Control volume. (Without it, your engineer will have to use excessive compression to even out volume, control distortion and bring soft sounds up so they can be heard. Some degree of "riding the faders" and compression is normal and usual, but the less the better. The less your vocals need to be compressed, the richer the resulting sound.) Control vocal lics and embellishments. (Without it, you will not be able to sing some vocal lics you attempt; "scats" or phrasing nuances will not "turn" well or flow evenly.) Control vibrato. (Without it, your vibrato will be too much, too little, uneven or inappropriately applied.) Control tone color. (Without it, the tone color of your voice will be too "covered", "hooty", "edgy", harsh, numb and boring or just plain wrong for the message. Your choices of tone of voice will be seriously limited, and your voice will sound small and/or unpleasant.) Control articulation. (Without it, you will over-, or more usually, under- pronounce the lyrics. There are differing degrees of articulation appropriate for different genres and tempos and types of lyrics. Singers must be able to know and apply the proper way to form words for their songs. For instance, blues music is pronounced more slurry. Hip- hop generally has sharper attacks. Pop is usually articulated clearer. Musical theater diction usually needs to be very crisp, but if you try to use this kind of diction in a pop song you will sound fake. But all songs should be understood, or the connection to the audience is not going to be made well.) Control sibilance. (Without this, recording your vocal can be a nightmare because too much sibilance hurts the listener's ears! And fixing excessive "s" sounds with de-"ss'ers always limits the quality of sound. A related problem is the popping of "p"s and other consonants. You must be able to control your consonants even while you clearly form them.) Control dynamic expression. (Without it, you will over-express and sound fake, under-express and bore the listener out of their minds, or bring too many changing emotional levels to the song to sound authentic and really move the heart of your listener. You have to know how to express the emotion of the lyric like a great actor delivering lines that invite an emotional response to the message.) Control the beginnings and ends of each phrase. (Without it, you will have trouble getting the beginning of the line right. You will drop off the ends of your sentences, robbing the listener of the complete thought. You will also find yourself with a lack of other kinds of control of initiating and ending lines, because you didn't set yourself up properly before entering the phrase or you've dropped your controlling support too early.) Control rhythm. (Without it, you will not be singing with the groove. You will be too early, too late or have inappropriate placement of lyrics via the beat. Again, different genres ask for different places the lyric should fit with the beat, but you have to know what your genre norms are and have the ability to sing with the beat that way. For instance, hip-hop usually has the lyric slightly behind the beat, pop usually right on top of it, gospel and big band "Sinatra" types are flexibly in and around the beat, but you really have to sing with a lot of the masters to get this authentically right.) Control pitch. (Without it, your engineer will have to tune the vocal too much, resulting in a mechanistic, artificial sound. You may be so inconsistent and inaccurate that tuning becomes almost impossible, because the tuner "grabs" the wrong pitch or can't draw the lic well enough to sound natural. Your bended notes may be so far off there is no way to make them sound in tune. Fact: The less you have to tune a vocal, the better. Don't get complacent here and think you can just have your engineer fix it in the mix. You'll be unpleasantly surprised.) Can you think of other types of control issues you've found in the studio? Which of these would you like to know more about? This essay first published September 21, 2009 on The Modern Vocalist.com the Internet's #1 community for vocal professionals, voice health practitioners and pro-audio companies worldwide since November 2008. View full articles
  14. A large part of vocal training involves learning vocal control. Without vocal control, any vocal recording will suffer dreadfully. With it, you can do things you can only dream about without it. Another problem with lack of control is that if you are singing with any degree of power, you are going to experience a lot more vocal fatigue and risk damage to your instrument if you sing too long. With it, you can sing all day and not experience vocal strain. Yes, it's true! And a lack of control will cause you and your recording team frustration, or you'll just give up and settle for the best you and they think you can do. Usually, it's a huge waste of time and resources. Live performances are more forgiving of slight control issues, but studio singing requires surgically accurate control. So what am I talking about? For a great recording, you need vocal technique skills that will enable you to: Control volume. (Without it, your engineer will have to use excessive compression to even out volume, control distortion and bring soft sounds up so they can be heard. Some degree of "riding the faders" and compression is normal and usual, but the less the better. The less your vocals need to be compressed, the richer the resulting sound.) Control vocal lics and embellishments. (Without it, you will not be able to sing some vocal lics you attempt; "scats" or phrasing nuances will not "turn" well or flow evenly.) Control vibrato. (Without it, your vibrato will be too much, too little, uneven or inappropriately applied.) Control tone color. (Without it, the tone color of your voice will be too "covered", "hooty", "edgy", harsh, numb and boring or just plain wrong for the message. Your choices of tone of voice will be seriously limited, and your voice will sound small and/or unpleasant.) Control articulation. (Without it, you will over-, or more usually, under- pronounce the lyrics. There are differing degrees of articulation appropriate for different genres and tempos and types of lyrics. Singers must be able to know and apply the proper way to form words for their songs. For instance, blues music is pronounced more slurry. Hip- hop generally has sharper attacks. Pop is usually articulated clearer. Musical theater diction usually needs to be very crisp, but if you try to use this kind of diction in a pop song you will sound fake. But all songs should be understood, or the connection to the audience is not going to be made well.) Control sibilance. (Without this, recording your vocal can be a nightmare because too much sibilance hurts the listener's ears! And fixing excessive "s" sounds with de-"ss'ers always limits the quality of sound. A related problem is the popping of "p"s and other consonants. You must be able to control your consonants even while you clearly form them.) Control dynamic expression. (Without it, you will over-express and sound fake, under-express and bore the listener out of their minds, or bring too many changing emotional levels to the song to sound authentic and really move the heart of your listener. You have to know how to express the emotion of the lyric like a great actor delivering lines that invite an emotional response to the message.) Control the beginnings and ends of each phrase. (Without it, you will have trouble getting the beginning of the line right. You will drop off the ends of your sentences, robbing the listener of the complete thought. You will also find yourself with a lack of other kinds of control of initiating and ending lines, because you didn't set yourself up properly before entering the phrase or you've dropped your controlling support too early.) Control rhythm. (Without it, you will not be singing with the groove. You will be too early, too late or have inappropriate placement of lyrics via the beat. Again, different genres ask for different places the lyric should fit with the beat, but you have to know what your genre norms are and have the ability to sing with the beat that way. For instance, hip-hop usually has the lyric slightly behind the beat, pop usually right on top of it, gospel and big band "Sinatra" types are flexibly in and around the beat, but you really have to sing with a lot of the masters to get this authentically right.) Control pitch. (Without it, your engineer will have to tune the vocal too much, resulting in a mechanistic, artificial sound. You may be so inconsistent and inaccurate that tuning becomes almost impossible, because the tuner "grabs" the wrong pitch or can't draw the lic well enough to sound natural. Your bended notes may be so far off there is no way to make them sound in tune. Fact: The less you have to tune a vocal, the better. Don't get complacent here and think you can just have your engineer fix it in the mix. You'll be unpleasantly surprised.) Can you think of other types of control issues you've found in the studio? Which of these would you like to know more about? This essay first published September 21, 2009 on The Modern Vocalist.com the Internet's #1 community for vocal professionals, voice health practitioners and pro-audio companies worldwide since November 2008.