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  1. Version

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    With a teaching career that spans nearly four decades, Jeannie Deva is an international celebrity voice and performance coach, published author, clinician, recording studio vocal producer, trainer of voice teachers and originator of The Deva Method® - Complete Voice Training for Stage and Studio.As a graduate from Berklee College of Music in 1975 with a degree in Composition and Arranging, Jeannie assisted in establishing the college's voice department and later became President of Berklee's Alumni Association for ten-years. Voice teachers around the world base their teaching on Ms Deva's method from her published books and CDs. She is featured on the acclaimed video The Vocalist's Guide to Fitness, Health and Musicianship by Internationally respected music educator Julie Lyonn Lieberman and distributed by Hal Leonard. Jeannie Deva www.JeannieDeva.com

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  2. Version

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    Robert Lunte is the owner founder of the The Vocalist Studio International www.TheVocalistStudio.com, an Internationally recognized voice training school for extreme singing vocal techniques and advanced vocal instruction. Robert is also the author and producer of the critically acclaimed vocal instruction training system, “The Four Pillars of Singing”. TVS techniques are shared around the world by voice teachers as part of the TVS International Certified Instructor Program, which is one of the fastest growing vocal organizations of highly trained voice coaches in the world today. Robert is also the founder of The Modern Vocalist World www.TheModernVocalistWorld.com, the #1 online resource for vocal education and networking on the internet. This download include four separate interviews of Robert Lunte. www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com

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    Peter Freedman is the founder of RØDE Microphones, an Australian-based designer and manufacturer of microphones, related accessories and audio software. Its products are used in studio and location sound recording as well as live sound reinforcement. Peter Freedman www.RODEMicrophones.com

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  4. I've been able to sing in a much fuller sounding voice in higher notes (let's say D4 and above?). I think that what I'm doing is more mix than belting. When a high note, let's say an A4, comes out full I'm sometimes surprised with the result while I sing. It's not a fun: "wow, I sound so full in high notes!" but more like "it came out very full compared to what I was expecting, am I off-key?". Usually - the answer is "no". However, when singing, this moment of doubt is problematic and might cause mistakes in the next notes. Anyone ever encountered something like this? ideas on how to deal with it? I'm trying to sing quite a lot to get used to my high register but I didn't manage to enirely resolve this (crazy?) problem...
  5. Hi guys, as some of you may know I am the happy owner of a vocal effects unit by Digitech (Vocalist Live FX), which I rely on to get a great sound when I'm performing or during band practice. I am not disputing which brand is the best/worst, but as I just stumbled on this short list from 2016, I thought it would be cool to share it with fellow members. I hope you enjoy it. Keep on Rocking! https://www.gearank.com/guides/vocal-effects-pedal
  6. I wanted to share my experience of singing and my journey over the last few years. This is on the mental side of things, outside of physical technique. I have found that this is as important as practicing the right embouchure, bridging, building co-ordination etc. Would love to hear what others have to say on this topic. 1. Preparing for a marathon and not a sprint Singing is an intensely physical co-ordination activity. To learn the co-ordinations is quite time consuming and to do it as a matter of muscle memory takes months and years to master. There is no shortcut or easy way to "master" singing in a month or two. With time and commitment results will come 2. Pushing boundaries In my experience, you need to sound bad, even awful before you can start sounding good. The best way to learn is to pick songs that are outside of one's capability. Just a little bit, not too much that you get discouraged, but just a little bit so that you can work towards a goal. It could be a section of song which is a bit high, or some melody you are not able to get. Always pick something that is deficient in you and when you get there, move on to the next song and next goal. 3. Prepare to unlearn and learn again Singing well demands you to make capability jumps. For e.g. getting respiration right, or bridging, or head voice strength, or correcting nasality, singing with an open throat technique. Each threshold jump in a way resets your singing, in a good manner. But you have to learn to make small adjustments with these new improvements. I for e.g. struggled with nasality for a long time. When I fixed it to a reasonable extent, my technique and my mouth, vocal tract shaping meant that I had to re-learn the same songs again. This is normal. 4. Taking criticism well & building humility Prepare to send your voice to all kinds of people. This forum is a fabulous place to start. Ronws has a great article on criticism. Check it out. There are always people better than you. If your singing is not appreciated, there is usually a logical reason and not merely somebody's fancies. Almost every problem in a vocal sample usually has a logical fix to it. Try to find it and do a little better. Each and every time. Getting defensive about your singing is the single worst thing that you can do to your development. Acknowledge your deficiencies and have the humility to start working on them. This is perhaps the single biggest thing one needs to do to become better. 5. Start ear training I had very little exposure to ear training since I had no formal training on any instrument or voice as a child. When I started taking ear training seriously, I could see all the places where I was off pitch. Believe me when I say singing is only 50% in your mouth. The rest is in your ears. You can only sing what you perceive what you hear. I was able to make bigger gains when I started realizing that my issues were related to pitch and how to build a series of notes and where those notes needed to be. Once I could get a clearer understanding of the song construct, it was easier for me to get the physical co-ordination to be able to sing. Try to understand what legato means and how you can use it to stitch together notes to form a sentence Singing is a physical activity controlled by your mind. Your body reacts to the sensations triggered by your mind...
  7. I wached two interesting videos: Bobby McFerrin Demonstrates the Power of the Pentatonic Scale and The Unanswered Question 1973 1 Musical Phonology Bernstein with sound This has made me think pf pentatonics. It's said that those pentatonics are natural to sing but we can end up with sime problem if just accept this fact without thinking bout being practcal as well. It would be nice if some singing experts could help me with this: If the major pentatonic scale is really that natural then matching pitch when singing shouldn't be that easy. If for example you manage to sing the note C then mtching the other pitches should be very easy since they are natural to sing and require no vocal train whatsoever. 1. It is said that some pop songs have melodies that is only with a fifth inveral since people who aee not good singers don't feel comfortable singing in a broader vocal range. But the major pentatonic scale has a range a bit broader than a fifth. It's actually nearly a minor seventh interval (somewhere between A and Bb). Does this show that pentatonics ain't that natural to us as we might think? 2. I did the experiment in which you sing the children's  teasing rhyme that Mr Berstein mentioned in the video. I tried singing this and I found that the first note I landed on was something very close to a fifth about C (below middle C). The third note I sang should have been A and Bb (called the 7th harmonics) but it was a bit high for me in order to feel like a natural not to sing. If that is the note that all children sing when teasing eachother why didn't I manage to sing this note? It made me a bit frustarated as it should be natural to sound like teasing children. What is going on here you think? 3. In an equal tempered piano (as you know that is how you tune a piano today and a bit different from how people really sing) the fifth note of the major pentatonics scale is played as an A rather than Bb. That note is closer to Bb they say. Why then do we play it as an A rather than Bb do you think? I am not interested in having arguments about pentatonics but I am interested in making my knowledge of pentatonics into something practical for a singer.
  8. The female vocalist of Triosphere is Ida Haukland. She has a very commanding and powerful voice that goes beyond the typical opera style you see in a lot of female fronted metal bands these days. I realize that she's female but is that type of power she has achievable through vocal training for a male?(ala 4 Pillars)?
  9. Hey everyone! I am new in here so I apologize if this topic is misplaced. I have been playing the guitar and singing for a while now. I have always had minor to large trouble in signing along with the guitar due to being out of tune. When I did manage to find the correct tune to sing in I was often able to keep it throughout the song. I always felt it when I was singing in tune but when I wasn't, I couldn't fix it easily, I just could not find the proper tune, I wasn't 'feeling' the guitar or the notes I was singing sometimes. Then I accidentaly found out when I tried singing in the bathroom (the bathroom is fairly small and there is a lot of acoustics and possibly echo) that I was able to clearly hear everything that I was singing and I was feeling every note. Then I actually brought the guitar to the bathroom and played some of the songs I usually have a ton of trouble singing to while I'm playing and sang perfectly in tune with the music. I was singing clear notes and could sing any song in any tune and adapt immediately to the guitar. I realized I could also sing a lot higher notes than I thought I would because now I had a feeling of what I was doing. This was a big problem for me for a long long time. With this new insight I can express my problem easier: when I am singing in a normal open space (even a normal room) I am simply not hearing or feeling the music or the notes I am singing, I sometimes go way off tune and I can notice something is wrong but it is like I am walking in the dark I can not direct myself I don't know if I should sing higher or lower sometimes to match the music, but in a very enclosed acoustic space where the notes echo back to me better I am a completely different singer and I can hear and feel what I am and should be singing. Do you have any advice on how to conquer this problem and be able to sing in tune and feel the notes I am singing in any environment? It seems like a strange problem to me. Thank you in advance for all your advice, Vedran
  10. There were some threads recently talking about how you can't trust the content you see on videos due to editting, and that the top singers end result is always handled by specialists that makes it better than anything possible otherwise. Came across this one, consider these performances: Now the sound of the band on the second version is much better but the vocals are so POORLY auto-tuned that it ruins Myles voice completely. This is something quite common when it comes to higher end singers, and I often come across some of these artifacts on dvds and stuff, but this is so bizarrely evident that it represents it perfectly. One of these cases where if they did nothing it would be far better than this...
  11. So I just read this thread, with questions about the whistle register. https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090515195134AAVLmFS And the person who got picked to have the best answer said, that the whistle register is not a register, but a range. Is it true?
  12. What do you guys think about this guy's technique in terms of his agility? Does the shape of his mouth help with the insane vocal agility he has?
  13. I'd appreciate hearing some of youz guys's perspectives on Paul Rogers comments in this interview. I'm sure everyone would agree with his comments about "warming up" however, he makes an interesting comment about "his range," and then still manages to really avoid answering the question. Personally, I'm convinced he simply doesn't know the answer yet, he does offer the good warm up advice. The actual question is: "why do some singers lose their upper range as they age, and some don't?" -That's point #1, point #2 is, what about the interesting answer he gives regarding "feeling the song" in order to confidently sing the high notes in it. There are a few singers who don't seem in possession of the range they commanded in the prime of their career: i.e. Perry, Plant, Elton vs. other singers who are still going strong past their career peak: i.e. Rogers, Tyler, Elefante, Mickey Thomas, Tony Bennett, etc. the question is asked around 22:30
  14. Hi! I was doing an experiment the other day. You know how a wolf howls (their way of singing). I was trying to do the same thing and boy did I get higher pitches than I normally get when I sing. Anyone here with the same experience? It seems to me that howling is way easier than doing normal singing. It's way more natural for me to howl than to sing. What do you make of this? I guess one just need to find out how to howl in tune.
  15. What are these kinds of singers doing? Are they just shouting? Belting with distortion?
  16. I have listened and watched this singer from very young.... amazing technique, beautiful voice, and loving personality. Today, a crazy person shot her while she was signing autographs for fans. As singers we pray for success not for jealousy, hate, and entitlement - but it comes with it. Speechless.
  17. Probably an obvious question. Or not. What makes you a singer or want to be a singer? I play guitar but around 1988 I realized or decided that I was a singer who played guitar, rather than a guitar player who sings. So, I am looking for ponderings and pontifications. How you became a singer or what led you here to improve your craft of singing. Or, at least, look for validation of your singing. Sure, anyone can record and release and even be successful as a pro singer. And there are pro singers of varying quality, having nothing or everything to do with their respective success. However, it seems special to get validation from your peers, namely, other serious singers. I have always liked singing and everyone in my family sang, so, it did not feel "special." However, I felt the need to sing, even as I learned songs that were hard on the guitar. The point was to do the whole song. Even if only one guitar and voice. I cannot remember a time where I would only want to play guitar and NOT sing. Coming here and enjoying the fellowship and awesome opportunity to learn has improved my singing, I think, regardless of having sang for many years, in public, in front of others, including people who do not know me and have no interest in preserving my feelings, delicate or otherwise. What is it about singing that really draws you in? It's indefinable, even as I try to think of helpful ideas or expressions in this initial post.
  18. Matt Bellamy has been one of the greatest influences in my singing. Very few artist come close ( Jeff Buckley, Brendon Urie) and I don't know if there are many that can.
  19. Hello I find michael kiske from helloween his voice is very unique. It always sound so high and bright. Does he ever use head voice when he is in his higher range like for example this song? At 1:40 he hits a C # is that in head voice or does he belt it? Because i tried to sing that note and it sounds too weak to be in head voice.
  20. Are there any tips to develop a safe distortion in my voice?
  21. Time for the female singers! I am starting with Barbra Streisand. Who are your favorite? E3-D5 She talks of her singing as "a gift" in this interview. But she also says that her mother was a Soprano, and that makes me believe her voice must have been educated, even if she didn't realize it too much.
  22. First off, thanks for having me! I look forward to learning from everyone and hearing everyone's vocals. I had to join the forum because of some confusion I'm having. I'll just get straight to it. I sing in pitch, almost completely (when recording songs I've written) when I sing in a way where I make sure I have NO breath when I'm singing. It's energy draining, but not only is everything in pitch in 1-2 vocal takes, but the takes sound good and "real". I contrast this with singing with a full stomach where the pitch is all of the place and just doesn't sound good. I would have no problem singing in this sort of "restricted breathing" manner being that it sounds good, and in pitch throughout a whole song; but it's just really energy draining, and can give me a headache sometimes, which makes sense because I'm trying to do something where I'm trying to cut off my breathing. Has anyone heard of this before? Does anyone have an idea why a vocal can hit every note when not giving oneself any breath? Much appreciated.
  23. Hi everyone, I'm quite new to singing, and have just become the frontman in a punk/ska band. We're mainly doing covers at the moment so I have to sing in pretty much two different styles, clean and more of a distorted tone. The problem I'm finding is that at the start I can sing in key on the clean tone songs (green day, bad religion etc.) and then afterwards I'll sing in a distorted tone for stuff like Rancid and Operation Ivy, which goes fine. What happens then is when I go back to singing clean, I find it very hard to get my voice in the right key. Is this something that will just improve with practice? Or can I do something that will sort of reset my vocal chords? Thank you for any help
  24. I have a pretty high voice so this is weird for me. I usually can not go below A2 but recently this morning I went down to either a F2 or a E2. I don't know if it was because I just woke up but i would like to know why on this situation lol. But the main thing is, how much can my low range extend if I am 16 years old? I am hoping not to much, as I don't want it to make me lose my high range
  25. Hi, I'm new to this forums and singing. I'm trying to learn the scientist and in my opinion, I'm going well. I have a concert in 5 days and scared that I can't sing the chorus. When I do sing it, I feel like i'm using too much breath (because afterwards I can barely sing the other parts of the song) and I feel like my voice is gonna die out. My voice also cracks and then I can't really sing the other parts of the chorus in tune. So the word I need help is "nobody"