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Found 193 results

  1. WOW... some of the best passion I have ever seen in a song. Beautiful and heart breaking...
  2. Rafael Gines

    How to sing In mixed voice?

    Any easiest way to discover mixed voice while singing?
  3. Rafael Gines

    Singing Loving You

    Am I whistling? Please share this link to your friends Help me to be a famous singer
  4. Robert Lunte, founder of The Vocalist Studio International offers some insights regarding the TC-Helicon, Performance-V processor for singers. VISIT THESE SITES TO LEARN MORE: http://www.TC-Helicon.com http://www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com
  5. TMV World Team

    KTVA VS. TVS : Early VS Late Bridging

    HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom
  6. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. HERE IS AN EMAIL THAT WAS DISCOVERED WHERE ROBERT LUNTE, FOUNDER OF THE VOCALIST STUDIO, ANSWERS QUESTIONS ABOUT KTVA VS TVS TECHNIQUES. Hey Rob, So I noticed that there is a difference in definitions between TVS and Ken Tamplin's program. Ken Tamplin refers to head voice as a mode; basically a strong reinforced falsetto. WELL, ... IN REGARDS TO THE TRUE DEFINITION OF VOCAL MODES, THAT IS NOT A DEFINITION THAT IS AS ACCURATE AS IT NEEDS TO BE. IF WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT MODES, IT IS BEST TO REFER TO THE ORIGINATORS OF PHYSICAL MODES, THE ESTILLIANS… WHICH IS MORE OR LESS WHAT THE TVS PHYSICAL MODES ARE INSPIRED BY. FALSETTO IS A PHYSICAL MODE, HEAD VOICE IS NOTHING MORE THEN A METAPHOR FOR THE UPPER REGISTER… HEAD VOICE ACTUALLY DOESN’T MEAN ANYTHING, IF YOU WANT TO BE STRICT ABOUT IT. IT IS A “PICTURE WORD” TO REFER TO THE UPPER VOICE SENSATION WE ALL HAVE… TO CALL IT A VOCAL MODE, IS TO CLAIM THAT IT IS A PHYSICAL AND TANGIBLE THING, WHICH IT ISN’T. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS ‘REINFORCED FALSETTO’. THERE IS ONLY A PHYSICAL MODE CALLED FALSETTO AND IT IS CHARACTERIZED BY A WINDY, OPEN GLOTTIS THAT ESCAPES RESPIRATION. IF THE PHONATION DOES NOT HAVE WIND, IT IS NOT FALSETTO. IF YOU “REINFORCE” A PHONATION ON A HIGH NOTE ABOVE THE BRIDGE, IT IS MORE ACCURATELY GOING TO BE VOCAL TWANG… WHICH IS ANOTHER PHYSICAL MODE. In TVS falsetto is a mode, but the head voice is just what you call notes that resonate from the head, in whatever mode you are singing. WELL DONE, THAT IS MORE OR LESS CORRECT. HOWEVER, NOTE THAT THIS DEFINITION OF MODES IS NOT JUST THE WAY TVS SEES IT. IT IS ALSO THE WAY ESTILLIANS AND CVI SEES IT. ESTILL ARE THE ORIGINATORS OF VOCAL MODES, SO PEOPLE THAT CARE TO BE ACCURATE ABOUT VOCAL MODES, TEND TO FOLLOW THEIR ORIGINAL FOUNDATION ON THE TOPIC, WHICH TVS PHYSICAL MODES DO. I prefer the TVS definition. However, I think that makes the whole bridging late vs bridging early debate between the two systems inconsistent. IS THERE A DEBATE? ... OH YA, KTVA WOULD LIKE CONSUMERS TO BELIEVE THERE IS… THERE IS NO DEBATE. TVS HAS BOTH BOTTOM UP AND TOP DOWN TECHNIQUES. THIS IS A TIRED, OLD IDEA THAT STARTED ABOUT FOUR YEARS AGO THAT HAS BEEN PROPAGATED TO CREATE CONFUSION IN THE MARKET ABOUT WHAT TVS STANDS FOR... KTVA HAS GOT A LOT OF MILEAGE OUT OF PROPAGATING THIS MISINFORMATION. IT IS COMPLETELY STUPID AND I HAVE CREATED NO LESS THEN FOUR VIDEOS TO COMBAT THE CONFUSION. Ken's criticism of what he calls late bridging seems more apt to describing some classical voice teachers who teach bridging to a falsetto mode instead of a twang mode, or metal screamers who rely on a distorted reinforced falsetto. His criticism being that early bridging over time breaks down the "mid voice," of which he doesn't define. HE TALKS A GOOD GAME AND CERTAINLY SINGS A GOOD GAME… BUT WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, IN MY OPINION AND FROM FEEDBACK FROM HIS CUSTOMERS, HE DOESN’T ALWAYS DEFINE OR EXPLAIN A GOOD GAME. IN REGARDS TO EARLY BRIDGING AND VOCAL ATROPHY… ON THIS POINT, I AGREE WITH KEN. THE LACK OF BOTTOM UP TRAINING WILL RESULT IN WEAK TA MUSCLE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE. BOTTOM TRAINING IS ESSENTIAL TO BELTING, BUT ALSO JUST TO BASIC VOCAL HEALTH. THIS IS WHY THE NEW 4PILLARS SYSTEM HAS AN EXTENSIVE BOTTOM-UP AND BELT TRAINING EXPLANATIONS AND ROUTINES. With the TVS definition, I'd say I mostly bridge early. But it's not such a big difference it seems. I can still bring a bigger boomier sound up higher, but from learning early bridging techniques, I'm not stuck to an overly heavy phonation with constriction. It's dynamic and free. PRECISELY!!!!!!!!!!! YOU NEED BOTH APPROACHES! DIFFERENT PEOPLE NEED DIFFERENT APPROACHES BASED ON THEIR NEEDS. YOU DESCRIBED THOSE NEEDS NICELY. I TOTALLY AGREE. KNOW THIS… THE REASON ANY COACH WOULD BE LIGHT ON TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES IS SIMPLY BECAUSE TOP-DOWN TRAINING TECHNIQUES ARE MORE COMPLICATED TO UNDERSTAND AND TEACH. IT IS A LOT EASIER TO TEACH BOTTOM-UP TECHNIQUES. TOP-DOWN TECHNIQUES REQUIRE MORE PRECISION AND MORE UNDERSTANDING OF THE MUSCULATURE AND OTHER DETAILS. "PUSH FROM THE BOTTOM UP ON AN AH VOWEL"... IS A FAR EASIER STORY TO TELL, THEN BUILDING FROM INSIDE THE HEAD VOICE. I think part of the confusion also stems from the SLS / singing success terms, where the mixed voice is their term for twang, and head voice is defined as a strong falsetto. WHICH IS AN AWFUL DEFINITION OF TWANG… AND PAINFULLY INCORRECT. AGAIN, IF ANY OF THESE PEOPLE, WOULD BOTHER TO STUDY VOCAL MODES AS I HAVE, THEY WOULD NOT BE TALKING INACCURACIES TO CONSUMERS. SLS AND SS SEEM LIKE THE LEAST INFORMED TEACHERS SOMETIMES. TO BE SURE, THEY ARE NOT TRAINED IN VOCAL MODES AND ARE WAY OF COURSE WHEN IT COMES TO BELTING. VERY FEW PEOPLE WILL EVER BUILD A STRONG TOP REGISTER BELT WITH "SING LIKE YOU SPEAK" TYPE METHODS. It's kind of silly considering the actually mixed resonance we feel is only from around c4 to E4. Mixed voice is just a bad term. YEP… THAT IS WHY I KILLED IT IN MY “MIXED VOICE IS DEAD!” VIDEO… IT IS A TERM THAT SOME TEACHERS USE TO KEEP THEIR STUDENTS CONFUSED. THE MORE YOU CAN KEEP YOUR STUDENTS CONFUSED, THE LESS YOU HAVE TO REALLY UNDERSTAND YOUR SUBJECT MATTER AND BE ABLE TO REALLY EXPLAIN THINGS AS A TEACHER. Am I understanding this right? TOM, I THINK YOU HAVE A LOT OF THIS PRETTY SQUARED AWAY. IT SEEMS THE TVS CONTENT IS HELPING YOU TO SORT THIS ALL OUT, WHICH IS GREAT. Tom View full articles
  7. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions.
  8. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  9. I hope i posted in the right section anyway i'm a new member, Luca and i came here to post this little REC of me singing, can you review me and tell me i'f i'm good or not, i've never had singing lessons so be kind please. Here it is recording206769099.3gpp. Thank you for answering
  10. Hello. I really like singing and I usually singing at home with karaoke near my computer, but I'm looking for a way to "upgrade" and start learning and use professional microphone for singing at home. My goal is to make "little singing studio" in my room. My questions are: 1. What I need to buy? 2. Do I need any special set ups for the room? Thank you! *Inspired by:
  11. TMV World Team

    TC Helicon Harmony Singer Review

    INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER I would argue that the TC-Helicons pedal style vocal effects are some of the best ideas to come out of their facility in Vancouver, BC. They are small form factor, intuitive to control and easy to get a great sound out of. No menu's to navigate, just simple rotary knobs, buttons and a master on/off footswitch. They are in my opinion a joy to use. The TC Helicon Harmony Singer is no different. Rotary controls for harmony type, wetness and reverb line the top along with a Tone button borrowed from the Mic Mechanic and a master switch flesh out the top. On the sides are the typical mic control switch along with instrument in and through as well as a thoughtful ground lift. On the back you'll usually find mic in/through as well as power and USB ports for firmware updates. What makes the magic happen, though, is the instrument in port. TC Helicon calls the Harmony Singer "Guitar Controlled". I imagine you could plug any kind of instrument generating tone and a line level signal but if you opt to use the TC Helicon Harmony Singer without anything you'd be selling yourself short. Why? Because the real beauty behind this TCH box is that it uses instrument pitch to perfectly dictate the harmonies produced. Aptly put your harmonies will always be in the correct key. Always. And that is what makes the Harmony Singer awesome. Don't miss the chance! Use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50 THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER: IN PRACTICE In practice, it took me little time to dial in something that sounded pretty convincing. The Harmony Singer gives you a pretty reasonable selection of harmonies from a 6th below all the way to a 5th above as well as mixes of the two so provided you don't have a lead vocal that's completely bonkers chances are you'll be able to find something that will fit. The key here to maintain realism is to use harmonies sparingly and to find the right place for them to sit in the mix in relation to the lead vocals using the Level knob. It would also help if you do have some basic understanding of chord structure to determine the optimal sounding harmony for the particular application. THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER: WRAP UP All in after spending a few weeks with the TC Helicon Harmony singer I can honestly say this is the first harmony effects box I've used that is both easy to use and produces realistic harmonies. It's not the real thing and I wouldn't use it in place of human produced harmonies in the studio but in a live situation its one more useful tool to add to your vocal toolbox. THE TC HELICON HARMONY SINGER: SPECIFICATIONS Mic Input Level @ 0 dBFS: -42dBu to +1dBu Mic input SNR: >104 dB Phantom Power: 24V (always on) Guitar Input Impedance: 1 MOhm Guitar Input Level @ 0 dBFS: -7 dBU to 17 dBu Guitar Input SNR: >115dB Dynamic Range: >104 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz Frequency Response: +0/-0.3 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz Control: USB for firmware and control Mic Control: using TC-Helicon MP-75 Microphone or Sennheiser e 835 fx mic For more info: www.tchelicon.com Review by Travis North *This product review is a courtesy of The Modern Vocalist World and is endorsed by The Vocalist Studio International.
  12. TMV World Team

    TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 Review

    INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON VOICE LIVE TOUCH 2 They call it a "Vocal-Designer". Interesting, I thought to myself while unpacking the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 from its box. As the name implies TC-Helicon has released a new version of its innovative 'Touch' series which builds upon the original Voice Live Touch. I'll be upfront and say that I never had the opportunity to try out the original Voice Live Touch so this review will strictly be based on my experience with the new unit: the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2. Gone are the colorful touch pads and diminutive LED screen. Instead, the Touch 2 is more serious wrapped in subdued grey with a much more usable LCD screen. Being this is a very menu driven device I imagine this is a welcome change to the original Touch users. TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2: Build This product can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. As with all TC-Helicon gear, the build quality of the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 makes it feel like every bit of its $500 street value. There are no manual knobs and buttons on the Touch 2. Instead, every control aside from a mic gain knob is a touch pad. It's an interesting design concept that is going to work for some but may be troublesome for others. The layout is generally straightforward and once you get a hold of the basics of how to drive into settings, the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is fairly intuitive. I wish TC Helicon had given thought to backlighting their pads as I can see having issues in a dark club environment finding the right pad to hit, especially if you prefer as I do to not stand mount it. As a workaround, I highly recommend using their 3 button foot control available for purchase separately. TC Helicon touts the VL2 as giving singers "unprecedented creative control of their live sound with state-of-the-art vocal effects and performance looping in an intuitive touch layout." This I agree with. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 packs an enormous catalog of preset effects to get you started sorted by genre such as Rock, Pop, Alternative etc. that mock the vocal effects used on a large v ariety of hit socks. If that isn't enough they are continually updating the catalog that is downloadable directly to the VLT2's using VoiceLive support. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 In Practice The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is pretty much ready to go out of the box. Built in is TC's fabulous adaptive tone which automagically applies adaptive EQ, compression and de-ess to your voice. It almost always sounds great and it certainly does on the Touch 2. Every effect is just about infinitely customizable on the Touch 2 including all the usual suspects of HardTune, tap delay, reverb, harmony, doubling, choir, and transducer. However, I generally found myself starting with one of the built-in presets and then customizing it to fit my sound. One of the more interesting features added on the Touch 2 is an effects "slider" that allows you to a choc tweak with your sound as you go. TC has come a long ways with their harmony algorithms by syncing them up with instrument input to ensure they are always on point and realistic sounding. The Touch 2 adds to the flexility of this by incorporating 8 total voices (more than you'd likely every need) and what they call "RoomSense". If one doesn't have an instrument to plug into the VoiceLive, the two onboard microphones take it the chord structures based off what its hearing in the room to decide how to apply the harmonies. I would argue there's no replacement for real harmonies, but this comes so damn close that admittedly even I have started using them. Another key feature to point out is the 6 track TC VLOOP performance looper. This is where things can really get creative with the ability to record your vocals on the fly for up to 30 seconds. The Touch 2 is so intelligent that it will even quantize those for you for perfect loops. One you have your loops you than then add Reverse, Filter, Slow Speed, Squeeze and Squeeze Auto to really make things interesting. Overall I felt that the looper was well done and simple enough that it could be used in a live situation. CONCLUSIONS about The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is without question an extremely powerful tool. At the end of the day, it does however, cater itself slightly more towards the studio and solo artist than it does to more of a rocker like myself. I felt the menu-driven design and touch interface left me spending more time in trial and error before finding a sound than I would have spent flipping a knob or hitting a switch on the Voice Tone series pedals. In my opinion, though, TC has found a niche within a niche market with the VLT2. If this looks like it might be your kinda thing I recommend you check it out.
  13. TMV World Team

    RODE NT - USB Microphone Review

    In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50
  14. SK Acoustics introduces its latest sound booth designed exclusively for singers with dynamic vocal ranges Introducing the SK Acoustics AEF Legato Vocal Booth The Soundkitz AE-F Legato Vocal Booth offers singers improved levels of acoustic support when recording dynamic vocal ranges. This is thanks in part to its Dynamic Voice System (D.V.S.) developed by SK Acoustics for capturing dynamic vocal ranges see the Soundkitz Legato's Vocal Sound Filter The Legato’s system features a series of acoustic panels that address the depth and range of a singer’s voice so you can Customize the acoustics to suit your voice To offer additional support the Legato Vocal Booth features an adjustable ceiling panel to give vocalist better control over capturing their vocals. This is especially helpful for singers with a broader voice looking to fine tune their sound. The SK Legato Vocal Booth is a universal acoustic tool. It is designed to be used in both treated and non acoustically treated rooms making it accessible to recording enthusiast at all levels of experience. We've added many features to this innovative vocal booth to provide you with the best possible recording experience (more product information available at Soundkitz Recording Equipment .
  15. Some of you guys have seen earlier preproduction of this tune. Here is the final presentation to you all... hope you enjoy. The Song is a bit about... the morning after. That feeling you get when you did something the previous evening or have been doing something that is fun, but now you have to pay the consequences in the heart. Then freeing yourself from it...
  16. Yoh L. Asurka

    THE WEEKND CHALLENGE

    Let's do a singing challenge on "The Weeknd'
  17. Robert Lunte

    What Is Vocal Twang?

    Vocal Twang is a term that refers to a physical configuration for the singing voice that is characterized by tilt of the thyroid cartilage, compression on the vocal folds and an amplification of the voice. This "vocal mode" is ESSENTIAL for great singing. It is the most important physical setup that a singer needs to train to develop to become a great singer. Vocal Twang explanations, techniques and training are all provided in The TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing". www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com. WHAT IS VOCAL TWANG?
  18. In my quest for the perfect recording setup, I was pleased to discover an audio recording solution that minimizes the amount of gear I require to produce my YouTube content. I create educational videos on an almost daily basis and having a simple and effective audio recording setup is essential to my workflow. That's why I'm pleased to have discovered the RODE NT-USB microphone. The NT-USB is a Condenser Microphone which means that it's capable of recording the human voice with far clearer quality compared to something like a lavalier or headset mic which contain a Dynamic Microphone.) There's nothing worse than listening to poor quality voice narration, so I'm a big fan of using a condenser for all of my videos. This microphone can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. To connect a condenser microphone to a computer requires a USB or Firewire audio interface or a soundcard that can receive an XLR microphone cable. Typically, the interface will also need to support Phantom Power for a condenser microphone to work properly. In my previous recording setup, I was using an M-Audio Firewire Audio Interface connected to an AudioTechnica AT2020 Condenser Mic. While this setup certainly does the trick, it has a lot of cables and individual parts. This Summer, I found myself doing a lot of recording outside my studio. In an attempt to keep my gear to a minimum, I tried recording ambient audio with my camera microphones. To my disappointment, all I got was a lot of noise from wind and not much ambient audio. My goal for my outdoor videos is to paint a landscape, but also to capture nature sounds like birds and leaves rustling. It was apparent that if I wanted to get a good audio recording outdoors, I would need to start bringing a condenser mic with me on my recording sessions. On each trip, I would have to carry my drawing tablet, easel, tripods, cameras, supplies and sometimes a camping chair. I didn't want the burden of transporting, assembling and disassembling a Firewire interface, so I was relieved to discover the RODE NT-USB which doesn't require an audio interface. It simply plugs in and is powered through USB. As far as the specs, it's a studio-quality microphone which means that you can use it not only for voice narration and podcasts, but also for recording vocals and instruments. As with most condenser mics, the polar pattern is Cardioid. The NT-USB's frequency range is 20Hz ~ 20kHz so it going to do a marvelous job of capturing a natural sounding human voice with clarity. It's dynamic range is 96dB and its Max SPL is 110dB. As I mentioned before, it's powered by USB 5V DC and its weight is 520g, which is a little on the heavy side, but not uncommon for a condenser microphone. The NT-USB is very well built using high quality electronic components. Its metal case feels rugged, but as with all condenser mics, their internal parts are delicate, so I recommend taking caution with this type of mic. You certainly can't toss it around like you would a handheld Dynamic mic. The kind you typically see performers singing into. Aside from a computer and recording software like Garageband, the NT-USB comes with everything you need to setup and record. It even works with the iPad as long as you have the USB Camera Connection Kit. Included in the box are a tabletop tripod microphone stand, a 20” long USB cable and a Pop Shield. I appreciate the inclusion of these accessories because having a stand eliminates the need fo r a mic stand which takes up a lot of space. The long USB cable reaches pretty far as USB cables go. And the Pop Shield is especially useful for protecting your recordings from being ruined by plosives which are the loud pop sounds you get when you accidentally breathe too hard on the microphone. Condenser mics are particularly sensitive to plosives, so a Pop Shield is essential. I must admit, everything is so nice and compact once you get it assembled. It's super portable and it takes a lot of the hassle out o f setting up to record audio. Now let's talk about some of the pros and cons of the NT-USB. I don't have much that's negative to say about the NT-USB so I'll start there. While RODE states that the NT-USB is pre-set to an optimal recording gain, I have to disagree. Not all recording setups are the same and in my studio, there is some fan noise from my computer which means I need to set my gain lower to get a good recording. The NT-USB does not have a volume gain knob, so I have to set the recording gain by opening the recording properties on my computer and setting the levels there. While that does work, it's kind of a hassle compared to just turning a knob. Why this knob was left out, I don't know, but I sure do wish it were there. As far as the pros, there are several. First, there is a handy on-board headphone monitoring feature which allows you to adjust the balance between your voice and the background audio while recording. What this means is that while singing or narrating, you can make the background music louder or quieter to make it easier to hear your own voice in the mix. As I mentioned earlier, the NT-USB is USB powered, so it only requires a USB cable to connect to your computer and record audio. No preamp, audio input box, phantom power or XLR cable required. Less gear means less time setting up to record and I like that. So if you're a YouTuber, Vlogger, Podcaster or Vocal Artist who is in the market for a great all-in-one recording device that's ultra compact and portable, but doesn't compromise on voice quality, the RODE NT-USB is a great option for you. If you'd like to learn more about the RODE NT-USB please visit RODE's website at www.rodemic.com. - - - - - - - - - - - - - If you want to be part of the world's largest online community for singing where great professionalists will review your singing, don't miss the chance and use the 50% Discount Code for "Review my singing" Forum: TMVWorld50 View full articles
  19. Vocal Twang is a term that refers to a physical configuration for the singing voice that is characterized by tilt of the thyroid cartilage, compression on the vocal folds and an amplification of the voice. This "vocal mode" is ESSENTIAL for great singing. It is the most important physical setup that a singer needs to train to develop to become a great singer. Vocal Twang explanations, techniques and training are all provided in The TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing". www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com. WHAT IS VOCAL TWANG? View full article
  20. TMV World Team

    What IS VOCAL TWANG?

    Vocal Twang is a term that refers to a physical configuration for the singing voice that is characterized by tilt of the thyroid cartilage, compression on the vocal folds and an amplification of the voice. This "vocal mode" is ESSENTIAL for great singing. It is the most important physical setup that a singer needs to train to develop to become a great singer. Vocal Twang explanations, techniques and training are all provided in The TVS training program, "The Four Pillars of Singing". www.TheFourPillarsofSinging.com. WHAT IS VOCAL TWANG?
  21. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles