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Found 151 results

  1. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  2. Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! Recording plugins are some of the most essential and fun additions for any home recording. The quality and variety of recording plugins available today is simply miraculous. With the right choice of plugins, and a little bit of skill at home recording, an experienced home recording engineer can produce recordings that sound very professional! Plugins are not just for vocal effects. They are also available to simulate vintage preamps, compressors and even recording consoles like the famed SSL console system. In the world of plugins for digital audio work stations, (DAWs), there is no company that does a better job then waves. Visit www.waves.com and learn more about how you can make your home recordings sound professional! TOP RECOMMENDED WAVES PLUGINS FOR RECORDING VOCALS! CLICK HERE TO VISIT WAVES RECOMMENDED VOCAL PLUGINS AT WAVES: CLA VOCALS * JJP VOCALS * EDDIE KRAMER VOCAL CHANNEL MASARATI VX1 * BUTCH VIG VOCALS * VOCAL RIDER * HR REVERB HR ECHO REAL ADT APHEX VINTAGE AURAL EXCITER WAVES TUNE WAVES TUNE LT DOUBLER * DEBREATH DeEsser VITAMIN * RENAISSANCE VOX THE KING'S MICROPHONES AND A LOT MORE...! * Honorable Mentions... essential! Other Vocal Gear Required for a Complete Home Recording Include The Following Recommendations: A digital Audio Workstation - DAWs: LogicProX, Reaper, ProTools. A digital audio interface: We recommend the Scarlett digital audio interfaces from focusrite. A recording, condenser microphone: RODE Microphones: NT1, K2 Pearlman Microphones See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. Headphones: Extreme Isolation x-29s. See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. A Reflextion Fliter: SE Electronics Reflexion Filter Pro Ambience. A Pop Filter: See The Vocal Gear Store for more suggestions. View full articles
  3. Dear friends, if you need lead or background vocal for your future song, CD or demo project, feel free to contact me. I can also write lyrics and create lead vocal melody. Check my latest work (Destiny). In this song I sung, created lead vocal melody and lyrics. https://soundcloud.com/iamnuri/nuri-feat-jovana-destiny-original-mix You can find my other works on my website: http://singer-for-hire.com/demo-songs/ Feel free to contact me! jovanasinger@gmail.com Website: www.singer-for-hire.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jovanademosinger
  4. Enjoy this new video that provides an overview of what vocal modes are and why they are important. If you train and study vocal modes, your understanding of the singing voice and vocal technique will be vastly superior then dealing with training methods that can't explain the physiology and acoustics of singing. The whole point about vocal mode pedagogy is to make the understanding and execution of singing better EASIER, not harder. So don't let anyone tell you that "vocal modes are necessarily too complicated". That is simply not true. If you take a little bit of time to just learn how it works, you will open up a huge door to understanding the voice and singing better. And of course we cover this in The Four Pillars of Singing 4.0! http://bit.ly/TFPOSONLINE. Enjoy this video and hope we can have some discussion about vocal modes.
  5. WHAT THE HELL IS A "SNILE"? I have formulated a new idea this morning that is great... I share with thee... This is a technique that is used to help train singing through narrowed vowels and improving the articulation of your lyrics when singing high. This technique is also great for resonating to forward positions and amplifying the "cup" of the hard palette. A snile is a cross between a sneer and a smile. It is used in singing to help narrow singing vowels to maintain intrinsic musculature support and stability with amplification, when singing pop / rock music above the passaggio. Mastery of The SNILE will greatly train your kinesthetic feel for narrowing vowels, resonating forward into an "edgier" position, and amplifying while keeping acoustic mass low and balanced. "THE SNILE" is characterized by: A lifting of the upper lip to expose the forward teeth of the embouchure.A "narrowing" of the embouchure, to prevent "splatting".A very strong, amplified, forward resonant position in the "cup" of the hard palette and "edgey pings" off the forward teeth.Must have dampened larynx or anchoring of the larynx. Notice How Geddy Lee of the prog. band, RUSH tracks "Limelight" through the "SNILE"! Who said that "FREE" Secret Tips Didn't Exist?! TRY "THE SNILE" NOW!! ... and post your results here! Video demonstration on "THE SNILE" coming soon... "THE SNILE" is just one idea and technique. It is not a "global" solution for all things singing... it you want to get a feel for forward resonance and narrowing, it is good for that. It can also help you to sing very accurately with great intonation and articulation.
  6. After studying the four pillars of singing, I was watching Nirvana unplugged, and noticed that for over 90 percent of Kurt Cobains performance, his embouchure was almost completely closed. Yet he still manages to perform, and produce a sound that is entertaining, and to my ears quite good. Even during his distortion, which he is most known for, he doesn't seem to be straining much at all, and his embouchure is still just open. So I guess my question is... is it really necessary to always use a full horizontal, or vertical Embouchure? Or as with the vowel modification, should the embouchure also be experimented with?
  7. Hey guys! Im just wondering does the following clip sounds like a full voice. I had a bit more time to practice lately (dont really have any time ussualy so im kinda not proggressing really good). NOTE: I can make this sound alot better and less airy and less shaky, BUT i wanted to share this one as this is what happens most of the time. Just wanted tips on what is wrong here. I know what to practice i have all that in Pillars but i dont know what im doing wrong! https://app.box.com/s/syjjny1vpzth1rpl06rb0oh10pc8arwl Thanks alot guys!!
  8. I recently had a breakthrough......It only took 40+years As a child and growing up I would imitate cartoon voices, High voices and Low voices.......For some dumb reason I never used them for singing, Except imitating those singers who already sound Cartoony ( Axl Rose, Brian Johnson). I guess I wanted my voice to sound cool or something, anything but cartoony. But when using some of the cartoon voices I could easily produce pitches pretty much anywhere in my range (on a spoken phrase)......I was playing with one of the Exercises in "Four Pillars of Singing" and Robert does tell you to Play with this particular one......I ended up in one of my "Cartoon Voice" configurations and there was no problem keeping the configuration through the passaggio (E4 to A4 range)........Here is the breakthrough........What causes these Cartoon Voices are an imbalance somewhere along the line...Too much compression......Too Much Twang.......Too much Larynx manipulation...... Too much lift of soft Palate.......Too much air......Or just not enough of something somewhere. SOME of these exercises are MEANT to over use some aspect or another of the Vocal package......WHILE TRAINING do not be thinking you are doing something wrong Because it sounds too cartoony.....What is making that Cartoony sound is what is being strengthened and it just may be the Week Point in your normal singing voice. I will give you One example...... Foghorn Leghorn....If you are having trouble Dampening your larynx (Dampening is slightly different than lowering) Imitate Foghorn Leghorn.
  9. I finally got my hands on a copy of 4Pillars. I wanted to do a thread where i will track proggress of my voice. Im gonna include the stuff i have recorded now and i am going to update this thread every 2-3 months with content after studiying Pillars. Just wanted for myself and you guys to hear how its going along. P.s. gonna steal 2 posts just so i keep it organised
  10. Hi everyone, I realize in the TVS methodology singing is after all the exercises and stuff. R&b and Pop head voice songs often are in breathy falsetto and not conductive to improving closure and control. Then there are super powerful high rock songs which are kind of like screaming (but still better than pure falsetto). In the frisell methodology they don't really mention singing... you'll be doing oo, ee, and aw slides for years before realizing you never learned to sing.  What are some good head voice songs to learn to get better control? Preferably within A4-E5 but if it's higher I will still try and work my way up there. I do not think there is a lot to choose from because few people have that level of control over head voice but also who are some good "role models" for male head voice.
  11. Robert Lunte, founder of The Vocalist Studio explains what the formant and the significance of acoustics in singing. For the first time, a voice coach on YouTube can properly explain vocal formants. To learn more about The Vocalist Studio training program for singers, "The Four Pillars of Singing", CLICK HERE:   Formant is also used to mean an acoustic resonance. In acoustics, it refers to a peak in the sound envelope and/or to a resonance in sound sources, notably in singing. In singing pedagogy and phonetics, it refers to the resonance of the human vocal tract. Formant is often measured as an amplitude peak in the frequency spectrum of the sound, using a spectrogram (a special instrument or software that maps vocal frequencies) or a spectrum analyzer.  Peaks in the harmonic spectrum define the tone quality of sound color in a voice, distinguish the vowels and provide vocal ‘ring’, ‘presence’ or ‘quality’.    In the simplest terms  â€œthe formant is not the resonant space itself, but the measurement of resonant energy in the resonant space (for our purposes the vocal tract)”.  Most formants are produced by “tube” and “chamber resonance”.  For example, when singing, the upper vocal tract, the resonators, the pharyngeal space, soft palette, the throat, and the mouth combine to create this chamber resonance.   By no means am I pretending that this is a complete explanation of formants in singing, it is a very complex topic. However, this is an attempt to just sort out the main ideas for students of singing, so they can grasp some basic understanding of the topic, which is all that is really needed to get some benefit for your singing.   Singing Vowels & Formants - BEST EXPLANATION ON YOUTUBE!    I partnered with Dr. Donald Miller to offer a digital download of his Voce Vista Software as well.. which allows you to better understand vocal formants. It is an application that works on PCs ONLY... and it is for purchase. I thought I would place that here as well, given the topic. Hope this is helpful.   Voce Vista Formant Software For Singers
  12. Members of TMV, As you can see, we are building the #1 community for singers on the web. The Modern Vocalist can attribute its rapid membership growth to the passion and quality of our membership. We are seeing some of the best talent from around the world join everyday from every genre'; Artists, Instructors, Hobbyists, Song-Writers, Producers, Engineers and Research/Science professionals have all heard about The Modern Vocalist and are rapidly joining. We have a vision for The Modern Vocalist.com and it is big. When we say that TMV is the #1 community for singers on the web we really mean it. There are several key factors that go into achieving our objective of becoming the number one community for singers on the web such as having a cutting-edge, interactive web site, a world-class leadership team and consistent membership growth. Membership growth is what I want to talk with you about in this blog. TMV is gaining on a very important milestone in our history, our first 1000 members! We would like to ask you to participate in a large-scale, communal campaign to push us up and beyond 1000 members by Feb. 7th. An experiment in large-scale social network badging. If you have a spare 5 minutes... Our team of community developers has discovered that simply "badging" Craigslist.com is not only very effective and attracts people from all over the world, but is easy and FREE. Here is what you do... The TMV Craigslist Badging Experiment: - Simply go to www.craigslist.com CLICK HERE >>> - Login if you have an account, if you do not you can create an account. - Pick any major city nearest to you, or any major city you choose and click on that link on the right column. - Click on "musicians" under the top left heading titled "community". - Top right corner, click on "Post". - On "pick a category" , choose "musicians" Posting Title: "New Web Site for Singers: www.TheModernVocalist.com Posting Description: "www.TheModernVocalist.com " Feel free to write anything you want in this space... tell people what you think about the site, use your native language, or just type the web address.. its up to you. Click on "Continue" Review your posting and click "Continue" type in the security word and click "Continue" Our most important partners are our members and their incredible combined talent and experience. Every new member build more value for all of us. Help us to take our membership past 1000 members and keep our star rising in the industry. Lets watch the numbers grow and see what happens... Thank you so much for being our member, sharing your talents and your passion for building something truly unique and worthy of International acclaim. Robert Lunte Founder TMV
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    If you are a voice scientist, researcher, ENT surgeon, Speech pathologist, voice coach or voice engineer - Join us on the voice specialists group: http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/ Lots of voice information to share there!
  14. Members of TMV, As you can see, we are building the #1 community for singers on the web. The Modern Vocalist can attribute its rapid membership growth to the passion and quality of our membership. We are seeing some of the best talent from around the world join everyday from every genre'; Artists, Instructors, Hobbyists, Song-Writers, Producers, Engineers and Research/Science professionals have all heard about The Modern Vocalist and are rapidly joining. We have a vision for The Modern Vocalist.com and it is big. When we say that TMV is the #1 community for singers on the web we really mean it. There are several key factors that go into achieving our objective of becoming the number one community for singers on the web such as having a cutting-edge, interactive web site, a world-class leadership team and consistent membership growth. Membership growth is what I want to talk with you about in this blog. TMV is gaining on a very important milestone in our history, our first 1000 members! We would like to ask you to participate in a large-scale, communal campaign to push us up and beyond 1000 members by Feb. 7th. An experiment in large-scale social network badging. If you have a spare 5 minutes... Our team of community developers has discovered that simply "badging" Craigslist.com is not only very effective and attracts people from all over the world, but is easy and FREE. Here is what you do... The TMV Craigslist Badging Experiment: - Simply go to www.craigslist.com CLICK HERE >>> - Login if you have an account, if you do not you can create an account. - Pick any major city nearest to you, or any major city you choose and click on that link on the right column. - Click on "musicians" under the top left heading titled "community". - Top right corner, click on "Post". - On "pick a category" , choose "musicians" Posting Title: "New Web Site for Singers: www.TheModernVocalist.com Posting Description: "www.TheModernVocalist.com " Feel free to write anything you want in this space... tell people what you think about the site, use your native language, or just type the web address.. its up to you. Click on "Continue" Review your posting and click "Continue" type in the security word and click "Continue" Our most important partners are our members and their incredible combined talent and experience. Every new member build more value for all of us. Help us to take our membership past 1000 members and keep our star rising in the industry. Lets watch the numbers grow and see what happens... Thank you so much for being our member, sharing your talents and your passion for building something truly unique and worthy of International acclaim. Robert Lunte Founder TMV View full articles
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    ArticlesJoin us!

    If you are a voice scientist, researcher, ENT surgeon, Speech pathologist, voice coach or voice engineer - Join us on the voice specialists group: http://www.themodernvocalistworld.com/ Lots of voice information to share there! View full articles
  16. Introduction TMV brings together singers and teachers representing a wide range of singing backgrounds and techniques, each with its own concepts and terminology. With the encouragement of a number of TMV members, I have volunteered to pull together a research project to collect and organize a side-by-side equivalency (or 'Rosetta Stone' if you will) of these core concepts and terminologies, incorporating the perspectives and experiences of TMV members. Our first step I am writing this blog to invite you into the first phase of this project, which is to identify terminology sources and traditions, and any particular schools, teachers, materials or training systems having their own particular verbiage that you think we should include. To participate All you need do is respond to this blog, and indicate your interest, and name a terminology source with which you have been trained, along with your most preferred genre(s), and your years of training. For example, if you are a classical choral singer that was trained for 4 years at Westminster Choir College, you could post that as 'Westminster Choir College - choral singer - 4 years'. Or, if you have been (or are currently) using one of the popular CD-based systems, Name it, your genre(s) and how long you have been using it. If you have studied with a private teacher (and feel comfortable discussing the core concepts and terminologies that they have used with you), by all means mention the teacher by name, the genre(s), and how long you have been studying with them. What I will do It will probably not take too long to collect the first round of information. In the next couple weeks or so, I will be setting up a discussion group, and inviting those who wish to help with the project to join. There, I will put up a first questionnaire, and we can begin to collect textual and sound clip examples of the concepts, and (especially interesting) clips which allow us to hear the sounds of voices using techniques and tone qualities that may have differing terminologies in the various schools/approaches. So, Let's Begin Please respond to this blog, and I will begin to build my lists! Yours in TMV, Steve
  17. Introduction TMV brings together singers and teachers representing a wide range of singing backgrounds and techniques, each with its own concepts and terminology. With the encouragement of a number of TMV members, I have volunteered to pull together a research project to collect and organize a side-by-side equivalency (or 'Rosetta Stone' if you will) of these core concepts and terminologies, incorporating the perspectives and experiences of TMV members. Our first step I am writing this blog to invite you into the first phase of this project, which is to identify terminology sources and traditions, and any particular schools, teachers, materials or training systems having their own particular verbiage that you think we should include. To participate All you need do is respond to this blog, and indicate your interest, and name a terminology source with which you have been trained, along with your most preferred genre(s), and your years of training. For example, if you are a classical choral singer that was trained for 4 years at Westminster Choir College, you could post that as 'Westminster Choir College - choral singer - 4 years'. Or, if you have been (or are currently) using one of the popular CD-based systems, Name it, your genre(s) and how long you have been using it. If you have studied with a private teacher (and feel comfortable discussing the core concepts and terminologies that they have used with you), by all means mention the teacher by name, the genre(s), and how long you have been studying with them. What I will do It will probably not take too long to collect the first round of information. In the next couple weeks or so, I will be setting up a discussion group, and inviting those who wish to help with the project to join. There, I will put up a first questionnaire, and we can begin to collect textual and sound clip examples of the concepts, and (especially interesting) clips which allow us to hear the sounds of voices using techniques and tone qualities that may have differing terminologies in the various schools/approaches. So, Let's Begin Please respond to this blog, and I will begin to build my lists! Yours in TMV, Steve View full articles
  18. Many singers identify themselves based on their voice type, such as I'm a soprano, I'm a tenor, etc. Voice type is really based on two separate ingredients: range (which notes your vocal folds can produce) and timbre (the sound of your voice). But I bet that if you ask a singer what their range is, very few will actually have the answer. That's really odd if you think about it. Athletes know their height AND weight but singers can't tell you the highest or lowest note of their range. What determines your range is the diameter of your vocal cords: the smaller the diameter (and hence) length, the higher your vocal range. An easy way to demonstrate this is to use coins as a visual example. Our smallest coin, the dime, illustrates the size of the vocal cords of the highest soprano; a penny works for the average female; for the average man, think nickel and for the lowest bass, a quarter.. Want to discover your range? It's pretty easy. First make the sound aw as in the word law or dog. Pucker your lips and allow your chin to go down at the same time. Now start on a lowish note and descend on a 5-note melody, 5-4-3-2-1 of the major scale to be exact. If you can hear your low note clearly, then adjust the pattern down a half-step (or semi-tone) and repeat the 5-4-3-2-1 pattern until your reach your lowest note. It doesn't have to be loud or even sound great. It just has to be there for it to count. When you find the note, write it down! Since most singers have 3 and 1/3 octave ranges, even beginners, your high note can be estimated by knowing your lowest note. Even if you have actually less than 3 1/3 octaves, you'll probably discover that you can produce more notes than you had expected. Here are some rough low notes and how they correspond to voice type: F (below middle C) - high soprano (expect a high A on top) D (below middle C) - regular soprano (I see this note ALL the time) A/Bb - mezzo-soprano F (2 below middle C) - alto (very rare voice type) A (2 below middle C) - high tenor E (2 below middle C) - tenor C (2 below middle C) - 2nd tenor/high baritone G (3 below middle C)- baritone E ( 3 below middle C) - bass/baritone C (3 below middle C) - bass These are of course approximate. So how low can you go?
  19. Many singers identify themselves based on their voice type, such as I'm a soprano, I'm a tenor, etc. Voice type is really based on two separate ingredients: range (which notes your vocal folds can produce) and timbre (the sound of your voice). But I bet that if you ask a singer what their range is, very few will actually have the answer. That's really odd if you think about it. Athletes know their height AND weight but singers can't tell you the highest or lowest note of their range. What determines your range is the diameter of your vocal cords: the smaller the diameter (and hence) length, the higher your vocal range. An easy way to demonstrate this is to use coins as a visual example. Our smallest coin, the dime, illustrates the size of the vocal cords of the highest soprano; a penny works for the average female; for the average man, think nickel and for the lowest bass, a quarter.. Want to discover your range? It's pretty easy. First make the sound aw as in the word law or dog. Pucker your lips and allow your chin to go down at the same time. Now start on a lowish note and descend on a 5-note melody, 5-4-3-2-1 of the major scale to be exact. If you can hear your low note clearly, then adjust the pattern down a half-step (or semi-tone) and repeat the 5-4-3-2-1 pattern until your reach your lowest note. It doesn't have to be loud or even sound great. It just has to be there for it to count. When you find the note, write it down! Since most singers have 3 and 1/3 octave ranges, even beginners, your high note can be estimated by knowing your lowest note. Even if you have actually less than 3 1/3 octaves, you'll probably discover that you can produce more notes than you had expected. Here are some rough low notes and how they correspond to voice type: F (below middle C) - high soprano (expect a high A on top) D (below middle C) - regular soprano (I see this note ALL the time) A/Bb - mezzo-soprano F (2 below middle C) - alto (very rare voice type) A (2 below middle C) - high tenor E (2 below middle C) - tenor C (2 below middle C) - 2nd tenor/high baritone G (3 below middle C)- baritone E ( 3 below middle C) - bass/baritone C (3 below middle C) - bass These are of course approximate. So how low can you go? View full articles
  20. Greetings, Fellow Musicians; This will be my first weblog. Please wish me well at this. I like this aphorism: A LIFE WITHOUT PASSION IS JUST ANOTHER JOB I am a passionate sort; one of my greatest passions is good singing. Over time I expect to elaborate on just what I think good singing to be. For me, I like a lyric message construed and presented with human emotion delivered with a sound quality that convincingly supports the feeling of the music. I enjoy music of many styles, of serious, dramatic, lighthearted or comic content, but with major emphasis on THE SONG. More on that topic in the future. That's enough of a beginning for now. Of several statements on TMV I've read, I'd like to expand on Steven Fraser's description of formants and vowels. Well done! Let me amplify that message with attention to the needs of singing groups who wish to sound well. I regard Mr. Fraser's description as most worthily presented, and hope my comments reflect appreciation of his knowledge. When I talk about formants and vowels, I care to begin with a brief recognition of the work of Hermann Helmholtz. On the Sensations of Tone (1885), wherein he makes clear that a fundamental tone struck, blown or voiced also creates many upper harmonics, all integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. (Stick with me here, we're going somewhere important soon). In producing vowels, as Fraser mentioned, certain of these upper partial tones are emphasized by conscious and unconscious configurations of the vocal tract heard as a group of tones we call vowels. So, when you sing the fundamental, the pitch you want to sing, many other pitches are also heard. (We're almost there!) These various additional pitches comprise what we call vocal quality or timbre. When several singers produce the same vowel sound, it sounds great if they are all on the pitch intended and if THEY ALL SING THE VOWELS EXACTLY THE SAME! If they don't, the singing sounds out of tune. In fact, it is; some of the upper partials may be so close to another partial, that dissonance results. Not good; unless that's what you want. This is why many a cappella singers care to practice singing duets and listening to the vowel matching. The whole group: chorus, quartet or choir wants to do this. When this is done well, it's magic, and often a sound other singers have not yet heard. Try this: get a friend to sing a vowel with you at the same pitch (AH, perhaps). Listen to find if you sound good together. Listen intently as you try to make your vowel sounds exactly the same. Play around with this a little, maybe with another listener to give an opinion. Then you're on your way to better singing. Thanks for Listening.......... Musiker
  21. Greetings, Fellow Musicians; This will be my first weblog. Please wish me well at this. I like this aphorism: A LIFE WITHOUT PASSION IS JUST ANOTHER JOB I am a passionate sort; one of my greatest passions is good singing. Over time I expect to elaborate on just what I think good singing to be. For me, I like a lyric message construed and presented with human emotion delivered with a sound quality that convincingly supports the feeling of the music. I enjoy music of many styles, of serious, dramatic, lighthearted or comic content, but with major emphasis on THE SONG. More on that topic in the future. That's enough of a beginning for now. Of several statements on TMV I've read, I'd like to expand on Steven Fraser's description of formants and vowels. Well done! Let me amplify that message with attention to the needs of singing groups who wish to sound well. I regard Mr. Fraser's description as most worthily presented, and hope my comments reflect appreciation of his knowledge. When I talk about formants and vowels, I care to begin with a brief recognition of the work of Hermann Helmholtz. On the Sensations of Tone (1885), wherein he makes clear that a fundamental tone struck, blown or voiced also creates many upper harmonics, all integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. (Stick with me here, we're going somewhere important soon). In producing vowels, as Fraser mentioned, certain of these upper partial tones are emphasized by conscious and unconscious configurations of the vocal tract heard as a group of tones we call vowels. So, when you sing the fundamental, the pitch you want to sing, many other pitches are also heard. (We're almost there!) These various additional pitches comprise what we call vocal quality or timbre. When several singers produce the same vowel sound, it sounds great if they are all on the pitch intended and if THEY ALL SING THE VOWELS EXACTLY THE SAME! If they don't, the singing sounds out of tune. In fact, it is; some of the upper partials may be so close to another partial, that dissonance results. Not good; unless that's what you want. This is why many a cappella singers care to practice singing duets and listening to the vowel matching. The whole group: chorus, quartet or choir wants to do this. When this is done well, it's magic, and often a sound other singers have not yet heard. Try this: get a friend to sing a vowel with you at the same pitch (AH, perhaps). Listen to find if you sound good together. Listen intently as you try to make your vowel sounds exactly the same. Play around with this a little, maybe with another listener to give an opinion. Then you're on your way to better singing. Thanks for Listening.......... Musiker View full articles
  22. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. THE VOCALIST GIG BAG TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY FOR SINGERS: FROM ROBERT LUNTE & THE VOCALIST STUDIO: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD TVS VOCALIST'S GIG BAG VIDEO OR WATCH BELOW! Microphones: - RODE M1 - RODE M2 http://www.rode.com/ - Electro-Voice 767a http://www.electrovoice.com - HEIL PR-35 http://www.heilsound.com - Telefunken M-80 http://www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com - Sennheiser 935 http://www.sennheiserusa.com - TC-Helicon MP-75 http://www.tc-helicon.com - AKG D7 http://www.akg.com Processing: TC-Helicon VoiceTone Pedals http://www.tc-helicon.com/voicetone-create-xt.asp - Create (EFX) - Doubler (simulates studio doubling) - Correct (compression) - Singles Pedals Wireless Microphone Solution - Samson Airline 77 http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=2018 Check That Mic Sanitary Wipes for Microphones http://www.checkthatmic.com VocoPro (HERO – RV) For Practicing and Writing: http://www.vocopro.com/products/product_info.php?ID=649 Extreme Isolation Headphones – X-29s: http://www.extremeheadphones.com/ex-29.html Vishudda Singer's Tea: http://aromatherapyinhaler.net/product/vishudda-singers-tea-kit-2/ Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS Series): http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_voicerecorders.asp Etymotic Ear Protection for Singers http://www.etymotic.com Hercules Mic Stand: http://www.herculesstands.com/mics/micstands.html PocketTone Pitch Pipe: www.PocketTones.com *Add this code to save $1. Special TVS Deal! (TMV08pt) Lyric Writing Software: www.masterwriter.com *Add this code to save $20. Special TVS Deal! (3059) Pen & Paper: Binder with all your bed tracks & lyrics: View full articles
  23. If you have any questions about these products, please feel free to contact me on The Modern Vocalist or send me an email at robert@thevocaliststudio.com and we can talk your specific application. THE VOCALIST GIG BAG TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY FOR SINGERS: FROM ROBERT LUNTE & THE VOCALIST STUDIO: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD TVS VOCALIST'S GIG BAG VIDEO OR WATCH BELOW! Microphones: - RODE M1 - RODE M2 http://www.rode.com/ - Electro-Voice 767a http://www.electrovoice.com - HEIL PR-35 http://www.heilsound.com - Telefunken M-80 http://www.telefunken-elektroakustik.com - Sennheiser 935 http://www.sennheiserusa.com - TC-Helicon MP-75 http://www.tc-helicon.com - AKG D7 http://www.akg.com Processing: TC-Helicon VoiceTone Pedals http://www.tc-helicon.com/voicetone-create-xt.asp - Create (EFX) - Doubler (simulates studio doubling) - Correct (compression) - Singles Pedals Wireless Microphone Solution - Samson Airline 77 http://www.samsontech.com/products/productpage.cfm?prodID=2018 Check That Mic Sanitary Wipes for Microphones http://www.checkthatmic.com VocoPro (HERO – RV) For Practicing and Writing: http://www.vocopro.com/products/product_info.php?ID=649 Extreme Isolation Headphones – X-29s: http://www.extremeheadphones.com/ex-29.html Vishudda Singer's Tea: http://aromatherapyinhaler.net/product/vishudda-singers-tea-kit-2/ Olympus Hand held Digital Recorder (The WS Series): http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_voicerecorders.asp Etymotic Ear Protection for Singers http://www.etymotic.com Hercules Mic Stand: http://www.herculesstands.com/mics/micstands.html PocketTone Pitch Pipe: www.PocketTones.com *Add this code to save $1. Special TVS Deal! (TMV08pt) Lyric Writing Software: www.masterwriter.com *Add this code to save $20. Special TVS Deal! (3059) Pen & Paper: Binder with all your bed tracks & lyrics:
  24. INTRODUCING THE TC HELICON VOICE LIVE TOUCH 2 They call it a "Vocal-Designer". Interesting, I thought to myself while unpacking the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 from its box. As the name implies TC-Helicon has released a new version of its innovative 'Touch' series which builds upon the original Voice Live Touch. I'll be upfront and say that I never had the opportunity to try out the original Voice Live Touch so this review will strictly be based on my experience with the new unit: the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2. Gone are the colorful touch pads and diminutive LED screen. Instead, the Touch 2 is more serious wrapped in subdued grey with a much more usable LCD screen. Being this is a very menu driven device I imagine this is a welcome change to the original Touch users. TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2: Build This product can be purchased at The Vocal Gear Store. As with all TC-Helicon gear, the build quality of the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 makes it feel like every bit of its $500 street value. There are no manual knobs and buttons on the Touch 2. Instead, every control aside from a mic gain knob is a touch pad. It's an interesting design concept that is going to work for some but may be troublesome for others. The layout is generally straightforward and once you get a hold of the basics of how to drive into settings, the TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is fairly intuitive. I wish TC Helicon had given thought to backlighting their pads as I can see having issues in a dark club environment finding the right pad to hit, especially if you prefer as I do to not stand mount it. As a workaround, I highly recommend using their 3 button foot control available for purchase separately. TC Helicon touts the VL2 as giving singers "unprecedented creative control of their live sound with state-of-the-art vocal effects and performance looping in an intuitive touch layout." This I agree with. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 packs an enormous catalog of preset effects to get you started sorted by genre such as Rock, Pop, Alternative etc. that mock the vocal effects used on a large v ariety of hit socks. If that isn't enough they are continually updating the catalog that is downloadable directly to the VLT2's using VoiceLive support. The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 In Practice The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is pretty much ready to go out of the box. Built in is TC's fabulous adaptive tone which automagically applies adaptive EQ, compression and de-ess to your voice. It almost always sounds great and it certainly does on the Touch 2. Every effect is just about infinitely customizable on the Touch 2 including all the usual suspects of HardTune, tap delay, reverb, harmony, doubling, choir, and transducer. However, I generally found myself starting with one of the built-in presets and then customizing it to fit my sound. One of the more interesting features added on the Touch 2 is an effects "slider" that allows you to a choc tweak with your sound as you go. TC has come a long ways with their harmony algorithms by syncing them up with instrument input to ensure they are always on point and realistic sounding. The Touch 2 adds to the flexility of this by incorporating 8 total voices (more than you'd likely every need) and what they call "RoomSense". If one doesn't have an instrument to plug into the VoiceLive, the two onboard microphones take it the chord structures based off what its hearing in the room to decide how to apply the harmonies. I would argue there's no replacement for real harmonies, but this comes so damn close that admittedly even I have started using them. Another key feature to point out is the 6 track TC VLOOP performance looper. This is where things can really get creative with the ability to record your vocals on the fly for up to 30 seconds. The Touch 2 is so intelligent that it will even quantize those for you for perfect loops. One you have your loops you than then add Reverse, Filter, Slow Speed, Squeeze and Squeeze Auto to really make things interesting. Overall I felt that the looper was well done and simple enough that it could be used in a live situation. CONCLUSIONS about The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 The TC Helicon VoiceLive Touch 2 is without question an extremely powerful tool. At the end of the day, it does however, cater itself slightly more towards the studio and solo artist than it does to more of a rocker like myself. I felt the menu-driven design and touch interface left me spending more time in trial and error before finding a sound than I would have spent flipping a knob or hitting a switch on the Voice Tone series pedals. In my opinion, though, TC has found a niche within a niche market with the VLT2. If this looks like it might be your kinda thing I recommend you check it out. View full articles