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  1. Based in Toronto Canada, Ms. Yampolsky's coaching concentrates not just on the voice, but on the performer as a whole. Her approach can boost stage confidence by improving the voice's range, pitch and power. She believes that a singer has 25% natural talent, while 75% of a singer's performance relies on technical training. Her special exercises enable the singer to meet any combinations of pitch and duration of sound. Ms. Yampolsky views the body as an instrument whose quality of well being determines the quality of sound produced and recognizes that the voice is a reflection of the 'inner self.' All courses are customized to the unique needs of each individual singer and program the brain using visualization and vocal repetition. The Vocal Science (TM) Method alleviates strain on vocal cords and develops proper use of facial and abdominal muscles while stressing posture. Mainly, vocal cord paralysis occurs after related (and unrelated) surgeries such as, for example: Thyroid removal surgery, spinal fusion and even simple surgical procedures that require surgical intubation (Tracheotomy). Often, those tubes are inserted incorrectly and, as a result, the vocal cord(s) could be damaged and/or paralyzed. The voice could be easily jeopardized if you have experienced stroke, or even unrelated surgeries, for example, due to even any accident, which requires surgical procedure. Of course if (God forbid) the sufferer had any growths like tumor, or even a simple nodule or polyp on a vocal cord, removal of any of the above could easily cause vocal damage and vocal cord(s) paralysis. The Vocal Science™ technique is the only alternative way, which could dramatically improve ones’ speech and even singing voice for that matter. The Vocal Science method is a holistic and alternative approach to voice mechanics. By the virtue of fact, the method suggests to remove the pressure of the sound from he vocal cords and lift the voice to the alternative muscles, which once put to work together in full conjunction and coordination, will amplify the sound 4 to 5 times over and will employ the wholesome vocal mechanism to work in its fullest capacity and with no pain or strain on the vocal anatomy. The space on the bottom of the throat is also released and thus, allows the room for the natural herbal and homeopathic remedies to work in the full force, which will greatly aid to the patients’ voice/vocal recovery. Please be advised that this process of restoration of the voice (after the vocal cords/vocal folds paralysis had occurred) is extremely tedious and intense. It could be also a very emotional process on the patient’s part. Obviously, their voice is not sounding the same and, at times, it Is difficult for them to pronounce certain syllables. I have seen a lot of tears in my studio/clinic, which sometimes served a positive deed, as after a good cry, the patient had regrouped and caught a second breath, so to speak. By that point, they got their sadness out of their heart and soul by releasing their emotions and even their voice became lighter and more compliant to the instruction. A lot of the patients, understandably, possess a lot of ‘stuffed-up’ emotions. That, by itself, could be one of the reasons of their voice disorder. I receive a lot of patients with thyroid problems and even removed thyroids due to cancer. In holistic teaching, the thyroid represents suppressed emotions and hurts. So, in the first place, they were experiencing something that, emotionally, they could not comprehend. Majority of the diseases are emotionally induced and then, they manifest in the physical body. For example: A bad marriage could cause a lot of anger and anguish. The human liver (in the holistic understanding) does represent suppressed anger. When one of the spouses dies of cancer, it is almost 100 out of 100 that it would be the cancer of thyroid or, even more so, cancer of liver. That’s, of course, if the marriage was full of disagreements and fights. So, from our side, we are wishing you peace and harmony in whatever you are doing in your life path. That will keep you happy and healthy & most likely by osmosis will keep your voice intact. View full articles
  2. In Vocal Science Uk ,Our voice repair specialist give you treatment ,without any surgery . visit us or call to cure you all voice realted problem. Call us at - 416-857-8741 Mail us at- info@vocalscience.com
  3. Just getting tips on YouTube is NOT EVER going to help you to sing better. A free tip without content and your commitment to practice and train, will do nothing for you. To sing better, you have to train, practice and sing songs. TheFourPillarsofSinging.com.
  4. Hello ! I am a 18 years old piano player. I've been playing the piano for more than eight years and that's something I really enjoy despite my many injuries, thanks to it. But nevertheless, I won't stop. I also have another hobby : I really enjoy singing. It feels so comfortable and it pleases me a lot. Singing has alwyas been different, even if I can't sing "properly" (according to singing technique standards), I'm still to enjoy it and I do. I've always noticed that unlike the piano, I'm able to feel what I sing (I'm French but speak English obviously and understand the meaning of every shing I sing) and how to say that... get into the song, let it flow throw me. I sound horrible but yet, I know I've given my all ahahah. That's something I've never achieved with the piano... Feeling the song. That's sad but I guess it'll come some day. I'll never be a star and I don't want to. I want to learn singing for myself (even if I must admit... that'd be great not to sound like a duck whenever I sing with friends, for fun) because as far as my music side tells me, I've gathered two problems : A very nasal voice (I guess it's because of a poor (inexistant) breathing training something I know is very important to singing) and I just don't know when my singing is right. I never know if it's too high, too low but I guess this problem doesn't carry on with training. I've come here to ask you guys if you had stuff for me so I can learn how to sing... correctly ? I mean... being able to sing without a nasal voice and to sing in tune (hitting the right notes) ; After that, maybe I could go further but let us not get lost. I like to enjoy myself even more! I've got a piano available 24/7 so if you've got things that involves having one. I do. I've got a little music ear. I can recognise notes but I can't play by ear for example. Anyway, I hope you'll find something for someone as beginner as me ^^ Thanks a lot
  5. Hi all, have not posted here for a while. I'm still studying and practicing and I've improved a lot but there's a big gap between what I can do and where I want to be. I had a few opportunities to sing while playing with people and I still sing out of tune more than I would want to (although I really improved in this sense), moreover, I don't always feel that I exactly understand my capabilities. When I picked up a guitar I've started playing with bands/people after two years of playing (a year and half of lessons and half a year practicing alone). With vocal training it seems like it would take much longer. I did have experience playing the piano before I picked up the guitar - so I already had fundamental for playing an instrument while singing takes some additional techniques that I never used (if that makes sense). Still, I'm writing because I'm somewhat frustrated... For the more experienced guys here: how many years of lessons and practicing did it take for you to be confident enough to actually start singing in a band/seriously recording?
  6. just wondering if anyone else suffers with this, every time i have a vocal lesson/ warm up my voice the tone and quality of my voice changes. i go from sounding very pop to sounding like a very weak opera singer. i find it very weird then about 20 minutes to half an hour later my voice goes back to a stronger better sounding pop voice. i asked my tutor about it and he's never had any other student who suffers from this i just wondering if anyone else suffers from/ can explain why this is happening. thanks
  7. At the very beginning of the song when he sings "Hold", the vocals just jump up an octave. When I try to sing like that I end up climbing up to that note. But in this video it almost sound like the that specific note is copy/pasted. I don't hear any climb, it's like the vocals just break and instantly jump an octave higher. What is this technique called and how do I learn it?
  8. If in theory you can work on your voice as much as you want and extend your range, why or when did you stop? Also, does "extending range" mean you will be able to sing a whole song in those notes or it means that you will be able to sing "one or two notes" per song at that pitch? In Fach (what I understand as Range), I see the lowest voice for female is supposed to sing at F5, but I don't think it is normal at all for females to be singing at that pitch. Is it? Edit: I've just seen in a Spanish page, the lowest female voice is said to be from C3 to C5 and the Head of that section is called "Tesitura". This makes more sense to me than F5... I was remembering this:
  9. Hi,I am a Computing Science Student at Staffordshire University, I am currently completing my final year project which will be a Vocal Warm Up application for the Windows Phone platform, below I have included the abstract of my report to add context, please do note however that this is likely to be reworded and is a draft in its current state,"The objective of this project is ultimately to create a vocal warm up mobile application, which will assist singers of all levels to properly warm up before singing. The following report details research into specific areas around mobile application development and vocal warm up exercises, it will be used to support design decisions which are made and the development platform which is used. I believe there is currently a gap in the market for such an application, specifically within the Microsoft Windows Phone environment as there are few apps available to users which provide similar features as proposed in the scope of the project."As part of the research element of my report I have created a survey posted on Survey Monkey and would greatly appreciate it if you could take 2 minutes to complete it, the link can be found below, https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/8TCXXSXIf you have any further feedback I would greatly appreciate an email at JBrian30221@yahooo.co.ukThanks
  10. Three and half years ago I decided I wanted to have a deeper voice. I did some research and found an article that suggested saying your ABC's in a deeper voice everyday until your voice became that pitch. THIS WAS A HUGE MISTAKE. It has massively hurt my communication skills and left me sounding very unnatural and unpleasant . After years of trying to correct it by speaking my way back to my naturally voice, going through phases of pain and scratchiness, I think it's as good as it can be without some help from people who know what their doing. I'm coming to this great community for advice on how to get back to my original voice and get on sounding the way I was meant to sound! Sincerely- RecoveringFromTheDeep
  11. Hi, TMV-ers! I thought it would be useful today to write a bit about how I approach and talk about vocal technique, in the hope that by putting these ideas out there, you can pick and choose some of them that make sense to you, and that you will hopefully find useful. As a starting point for this, I am inspired to recall an idea I read in Cornelius Reid's book, 'Voice - Psyche and Soma'. I cannot remember the exact quote, but the gist of it is that the mind and the body are acting together to produce the singing voice. I think this means for vocal technique that singing is simultaneously psychological and physical. A survey of books written on singing over the last 200 years shows that every teacher has a different approach to working with singers, a different mix of the psychological and physical. Some favor emphasis of the physical aspects, and talk about doing things with body parts, muscle groups, tendons, nasal cavities, lower jaw, the tongue, etc. Others emphasize the sensations of the singer, i.e., 'sing so that you feel such and such a sensation in such and such location in your body'. Still others rely on metaphors and imagery, i.e., 'sing out the top of your head', or 'imagine that you are projecting the tone toward a target on the wall', or 'think of a happy memory'. I don't do any of these alone. Perhaps better stated, I do them all, cherry-picking ideas and approaches from these authors that have these characteristics: 1) are based on anatomical fact, acoustical principles, and physiologically healthy bodily action. 2) are easily expressed and understood using in common language 3) can be practiced beneficially by the student without the teacher's constant supervision 4) help the singer build their ability to sing what they desire to sing - whatever genre or style that is. When it comes to teaching, I am also an optimist. :-) I believe that most people, with very few exceptions, can learn to sing for their own & others' enjoyment if they approach it with patience. In my next posts, I will be writing about the basics of how the voice works - 'what happens where' in the mind and body to produce healthy vocal tone. Along the way, I will address some common misconceptions I've encountered, and clarify some terms that are often used by singers and teachers, but not well understood. I have no illusions that the way I approach this is the only way, or even the best way. I am very interested to hear other ways of doing it as well, as that is how I learn myself. If you have a particular area you'd like to discuss, send me an e-mail or comment to my blog, and I will pull that text forward in a response. Best Regards, Steve
  12. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>>
  13. SK Acoustics introduces its latest sound booth designed exclusively for singers with dynamic vocal ranges Introducing the SK Acoustics AEF Legato Vocal Booth The Soundkitz AE-F Legato Vocal Booth offers singers improved levels of acoustic support when recording dynamic vocal ranges. This is thanks in part to its Dynamic Voice System (D.V.S.) developed by SK Acoustics for capturing dynamic vocal ranges see the Soundkitz Legato's Vocal Sound Filter The Legato’s system features a series of acoustic panels that address the depth and range of a singer’s voice so you can Customize the acoustics to suit your voice To offer additional support the Legato Vocal Booth features an adjustable ceiling panel to give vocalist better control over capturing their vocals. This is especially helpful for singers with a broader voice looking to fine tune their sound. The SK Legato Vocal Booth is a universal acoustic tool. It is designed to be used in both treated and non acoustically treated rooms making it accessible to recording enthusiast at all levels of experience. We've added many features to this innovative vocal booth to provide you with the best possible recording experience (more product information available at Soundkitz Recording Equipment .
  14. Hi- My 11 year old daughter enjoys singing. Her electives in school are band and Spanish, she likes languages and wants to learn at least two before she graduates. She sings in a local Chorus and at church. She had voice lessons for two years, but we stopped them because she didn't have time. She plays the French Horn in band. She also takes guitar, which she enjoys, but doesn't practice. The kids in her choir are really good, and it is very competive. She is in the second or lower level group, she really wants to make the main group next year. I found a voice teacher close to our home who I think can help to motivate her to work harder. She is more expensive, but also offers opportunities to showcase her progress. My daughter has little experience with solos, and I think this is a good way to get some. I am not rich. I spend about $100 on guitar lessons a month. I can afford the voice teacher if we drop guitar. I would like her to go back to guitar over the summer. Is this unreasonable or asking too much of her teacher? I feel bad quitting, but guitar is the least important of her pursuits right now. Is getting her a higher quality voice teacher important? She doesn't have natural talent as far as an amazing tone, but she is pretty good at pitch and sight reading. She has a voice that blends well. She isn't training to sing professionally, but to sing well for enjoyment in her life. I am also a believer in music being great brain food.
  15. I’m interested in doing real-time analysis on vocals in order to rate how "in tune" they are, using a programming language called Max/MSP, which I've been working with for a couple of years now. Something that’s sophisticated enough to be able to point out when the singer hits a wrong note. I'm on this forum to address a more basic question before I can begin and that's how exactly to quantify "when the singer hits a wrong note". How would a singing professional, like a vocal coach, define a missed note? I'm talking as far as pitch only, not tempo or anything. It may seem like an obvious question, but it's really not. There are plenty of programs out there already that detect pitch and perhaps compare it to a reference melody in a karaoke sort of fashion, but that’s not exactly what I’m asking. My question is: how does one take completely freeform input and decide if there are mistakes in it? As a test, I thought I could use a clip of some a cappella singing, something professional that definitely doesn’t have any off notes. However when I run my pitch tracking analysis on it, it seems that the singer spends an equal amount of time in the gray area between pitches as near or directly on them. I suppose this is because the singer’s voice slides all over the place and rarely stays completely stationary for long. So what exactly makes a note sound bad, when a skilled singer is using vibrato and sliding through all sorts of off key pitches all the time anyway? My hypothesis is that it’s the moments that the pitch does stay stationary that count; the mind doesn’t really pin anything down as being on or off key as long as it keeps moving. Kind of like how you can vibrato your way out of a shaky landing at a pitch and still make it sound alright. Is this a sound assumption to make? Any other insights into these questions?
  16. CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ CVI vs TVS: Review of “The Four Pillars of Singing″ BY FELIX, ON APRIL 21ST, 2015 So I finally decided to buy “The Four Pillars of Singing″ by Robert Lunte (TVS, The Vocalist Studio). Some of his tutorials and lectures on YouTube caught my attention and after a few days of consideration (+200$ is a lot of money) I decided to give it a try. When I started my singing studies I had decided to look at as many different approaches as possible and learn as much as I can and Robert Luntes perspective is certainly interesting and he definitely knows what he is talking about. I will compare his training system to CVT (Complete Vocal Institute) because it seems to be aimed at the same target audience. “The Four Pillars of Singing” is a comprehensive vocal training system that includes a book, over 350 videos, audio training content, detailed training routines, guide files and a robust learning management system that allows you to take a comprehensive course to study and master the TVS Method. It offers workouts starting in the key of C and G (to make it easier for women to use), training work flows and training routines for over 64 workouts, guide files that help you learn how to perform the workouts quickly and a very useful interface that organizes this massive amount of content. A user interface like this, is not available in any other program.. Robert advertises it as being the system with "the most content in the history of mankind". That is not only marketing but certainly a fact. But what does it mean? There is a lot of data in here, that’s for sure. The content of the book is similar to what CVT teaches. Especially the TVS method for organizing the vowels of singing into what they call, "Acoustic Modes". But unlike the CVT vocal modes, the TVS Acoustic Modes have stripped out a lot of additional levels of complexity, focusing only on where the singing vowels resonate in the voice and their respective sound colors. It is a very effective and intuitive way to learn about the acoustics of singing. In addition to ideas from TVS such as training work flows (teaching students to train with "step by step" instructions), specialized onsets and vowel modification formulas, "Pillars" also offers "physical modes" which are essentially very similar to the EVTS voice qualities or Estill modes. If your looking for CVI and Estill concepts as well as the unique TVS techniques, you can only find it in The Four Pillars of Singing. The focus is on all styles of singing. The 616 page book includes descriptions and illustrations of all the important components for singing; physiology, acoustics and mental imagery. The product is very comprehensive and a lot of work has clearly been put into it. With CVT, you only get a book and some sound samples and that leaves the less skilled voice student lacking for guidance and instruction on how to train and practice. One of the strongest aspects of The Four Pillars of Singing very well may be, that it seems to not miss the important point that students of singing technique programs have to have the content and guidance that no only teaches them the method and techniques, but also teaches them how to apply the techniques with training and practice routines. The sound samples with CVT are helpful, but the value is far below what you get with The Four Pillars of Singing. Then there is Robert. He sure is an interesting voice coach, he sounds very credible and his way of teaching is captivating. In a real-life coaching situation, that might be great and it certainly is important if you want to reach your full potential as a singer quickly. What is better, CVT or TVS? Should I buy Complete Vocal Technique or The Four Pillars of Singing?... or BOTH? It is important to point out that both systems are actually compatible together, but if you had to make a choice, given that "Pillars" already includes the main CVT premise, vocal modes oriented around singing vowels, then The Four Pillars of Singing is the way to go, given that they cover that topic with the "TVS Acoustic Modes". If you are a person who needs or learns faster with video tutorials and audio files to listen to in the care and practice with, then "Pillars" might be the better choice for you. Learn more about "The Four Pillars of Singing". Read reviews on Amazon.com. CLICK HERE FOR AMAZON.COM REVIEWS >>> View full articles
  17. Hi, I'm practicing since a year now. And I can sing quite good now. But whenever I perform in public, most of time I feel my voice very shallow and hallow kind of. I find certain strength lacking in my voice. When I practice alone, and with my friends, then I'm OK. I feel lake of connection when singing in public. Even sometimes I hit wrong notes, which sounds weird. I don't get too nervous, at least physically. I don't shiver so I'm unable to find the reason of this. Please help me out. What kind of practice should I do to rectify this problem. Thanks is advance!
  18. A GREAT BOOK ON THE ACOUSTICS OF SINGING I just had a great discussion with Ken Bozeman, the author of the book, "Practical Vocal Acoustics - Pedagogic Applications for Teachers & Singers". We talked a lot about how the CT and TA relate to each other and specifically, what they are doing inside of contemporary belt voice. I think I am lot more clear on CT/TA involvement now and "get it". I also have this book guys. It talks a lot about the acoustics of singing, but is practical and not too difficult to follow. It comes with a CD and a web site you can check into with supporting materials. I highly recommend. I'm posting it here since there was a lot of discussion about CT/TA in here and I think Ken's publication needs to be brought to your attention. CHECK IT OUT! CLICK HERE TO GET THE BOOK! http://www.kenbozeman.com
  19. It sounds completely absurd, doesn’t it? Believe it or not, in some cases, it is completely true. At first, when the person gets diagnosed with any kind ofvoice problems, they become devastated, then frustrated; after that, depressed and then, believe it or not, they get used to it and, in some cases, they truly embrace it. They have no other choice, you may exclaim! Yes, partially you are right, my reader. They have to embrace it and get into balance to be able to deal with their voice issues accordingly and promptly. However, a lot of people, after conducting a short search, give up on getting better and soon give up on even claiming their life back. Moreover, they discover support groups where they get “support”, but not how to fix their voice problem, but how to learn to live with it; and yes, “love” it. So now, they are caught in a catch 22 situation, so to speak.They have found, so called support, from group members. They also seem to have found emotional support from their family members and friends. Everybody is feeling sorry for them and expressing their sympathy. And before they know it, they, very quickly, get use to it. Then, sometime down the road, they discover the real help, which could actually suggest and lead them, in majority of cases, to the full recovery of their normal, or even better voice then they originally owned. And then, believe it or not, instead of getting excited, they are getting scared. . ? Of what, you may ask? The answer is; they are afraid of taking action towards becoming better and conquering their voice issues. And why? Because once they are back to normal, they might lose the attention of those who originally were expressing their sympathy and feeling sorry for them. They got use to it and they do not want to lose it. Having a voice disorder, they feel, somewhat “special” and expect special treatment by the people surrounding them. I am just going to give you one example from my 40+ years of practice dealing with all sorts of people with and without vocal disorders, issues or problems.……………………………………………………………………………………………...About a couple of years ago, a young girl of 26 years of age, walked into my studio/clinic with a horrible voice disorder known as muscle tension dysphonia. She hardly could speak and told me in despair that she used to be a medical assistant for ophthalmologists. When she lost her voice due to her very erratic behavior, (smoking, drinking, drugs and loud late night parties), she was let go from her position, as she could no longer communicate with the clients. At that point, she was collecting employment insurance. Nevertheless, I offered a huge discount for my non-surgical voice repair program, consisting of psychological counseling, diet and nutrition counseling, my unique voice instruction coupled with certain body movements which help to lift the voice off of the injured area (the neck muscles and the vocal box); and lastly, natural herbal and homeopathic treatments to heal the throat flora by also removing all of the impurities (like acid and mucus) from the bottom of the throat. After I explained to her all of this, which took about 2 hours, she left with no charge from my side and with tears in her eyes and promise that she will be back as soon as possible to take me up on my generous offer. Sometime after, she called a couple of times, arranged appointments and payment schedules, and never showed up once. Eventually, after about a year and a half from our initial meeting, she called again and now said that she is definitely coming to pay me and pick up a set of herbs so she could start her instruction and treatment with me almost right away. She showed up a couple of times; each time late for at least an hour or longer. She did half of the instruction, as she always had to go somewhere; and also she was, according to her, feeling tired. Out of 10 hours she arranged with me, she took only a maximum of 6 hours in total, which she had stretched for over a year period of time and canceled her appointments with me, at least 10 times in the process. Then she disappeared for another year and, as usual, being apologetic and blaming herself, she almost “swore on the bible” that this time around, she would finish her remaining hours, as she wanted to go back to work. (All this time, she was collecting government assistance and gotten used to staying up late and getting up at 3:00PM). Nevertheless, by now, she was loving it all the way. However, (not being stupid, by far), she intellectually knew that it was all wrong and she should get better and get back to her normal life. She also kept confirming that I was her one and only vehicle to bring her to victory. By now, it is shooting close to 3 years from the beginning of this ordeal. She contacted me at the beginning of this year again and promised to restart the program with me no later then, now, past April/May. Ever since then, I have not heard from her for about 8 or 9 months. Go figure! She is in her late 20s by now and, as far as I am concerned, her young life is ruined. She fell in love with her present lifestyle on a physical and psychological level and constantly fighting with her intellectual understanding of the matter. However, it does not prosper her forward and frankly, I don’t think that it ever will. How sad is that? To conclude: Please don’t get used to your voice disabilities. Please don’t fall in love with it and with the newfound “lifestyle”. The longer you are in it, the harder it will be to snap out of it. And if you don’t, it will be a complete waste of your, once precious, life. I have numerous examples of that happening which I will reiterate to you in my future upcoming blogs.
  20. In the light of the recent thread about people being born with singing ability and another thread regarding Vocal Coaching getting low PR. Myles is talking here about how he learned to sing (well not really how he learned but some info on his singing journey). Take a listen!
  21. iv always liked singing but im not good at it. so i picked up the singing for dummies book. doesnt seem like a bad book for some one new like me, but it doesnt go into details on somethings so that why im here and would like to use this fourm as huge help with my singing so hopefully you guys can help me out. I have figured out how to lower my larnix and drop my jaw. thats about all the farther i got in the book that i need help on. so my questions are you suppose to keep your jaw in the dropped postion all the time. and is your larnix suppose to be neutral all the time. im assuming since im new to this all these new processes are over whelming me. trying to push your jaw back and hold your voice box down is creating more tension then helping right now(my neck and the back of my skull muscles hurt pretty good from trying this stuff. not a bad hurt just like working your muscle hurt) . when i try to sing it feels like some one just run a poll down the back of my head down my neck and spine and locked it. that how tense i get to try to do all these techniques at once and i dnt even think its helped my voice much yet. anyone with any sugguestions please help me out. even if you have a video links to help anything would be awesome thank you
  22. Enjoy this new video that provides an overview of what vocal modes are and why they are important. If you train and study vocal modes, your understanding of the singing voice and vocal technique will be vastly superior then dealing with training methods that can't explain the physiology and acoustics of singing. The whole point about vocal mode pedagogy is to make the understanding and execution of singing better EASIER, not harder. So don't let anyone tell you that "vocal modes are necessarily too complicated". That is simply not true. If you take a little bit of time to just learn how it works, you will open up a huge door to understanding the voice and singing better. And of course we cover this in The Four Pillars of Singing 4.0! http://bit.ly/TFPOSONLINE. Enjoy this video and hope we can have some discussion about vocal modes.
  23. Set your Destination! “Drive” to it.Arrive and save your route in memory for future reference!What do you mean by “Vocal GPS”, you, my reader, may ask?What I mean is that, first and foremost, you have to establish a frame of reference of how to make your voice work upon design and inner-command. Recently, I received a singing client who happened to be very talented and even possesses absolute pitch, (perfect pitch).Being a musician since an early age, playing a few different instruments, it was an absolute pleasure to start a Private Master Vocal Coaching Sessionwith him. However and evidently, his singing and, for that mater, speaking voice, does require a lot of work.Being in his late 30’s, he adapted a lot of bad habits on his own and with “help” of his previous teachers. I told him that if I had compared his singing to a puzzle, then his puzzle would consist of a head of a cat, body of a snake and the tale of a dog (of course, figuratively speaking). It was very difficult to make heads or tales of his singing (no pun intended).In other words, what he heard in his head and with his ears was completely incongruent with the sound he was producing. Even in spite of having perfect pitch, he hit quite a few flat and sharp notes and his timing was definitely quite speedy. In other words, the whole voice thing was out of balance, so to speak.So starting the first session, I had to show him how to set his “vocal GPS”, i.e., how to program it and how to properly map it using my wall-based diagrams, which portray the exact message about the physical sound and its movement and direction based on the law of physics and geometry. Once the student understands it intellectually, the physical application of the sound is next. Now that the “vocal GPS” is on, I begin to play the role of a “driving instructor” and navigate my student, not only via “GPS”, but also verbally explaining to him, “along the road”, how not to “fall out of the road” and achieve an aimed delivery of his sound.Finally, after a number of hours spent, we collectively and separately arrive to the destination preset by the “Vocal GPS”.You would think that our journey is over which actually, granted, physically, it is. But, little that you know that, if the “destination” is not set in memory, the “driver” will not be able to embark on the same road again without reprogramming the destination back to the GPS. Sometimes, since the “driver” is new, he might have difficulties to recall the route back on his own, and again might need professional help to get back on the “driving seat”. I hope you, my reader, is getting my drift and fully understanding my figurative and allegoric manner of speaking.In other words, It takes approximately 30 hours of instruction to “seal the deal”.That also, and furthermore, applies to the non-surgical voice repair cases when the 30 hours of instruction and natural herbal and homeopathic treatment is a must.Let’s break it down…The first 10 hours, it allows us to set the vocal GPS.The Next 10 hours will take the “actual driving” to the set destination.And finally, the last 10 hours, (which is now 30 hours in total), will take to confirm the destination and lock it in the human psyche, brain and every conceivable muscle of the body and the vocal box appropriate muscles, in particular.So to conclude, the 30 hours is the protocol for success - singing, speaking or non-surgically repairing the voice.
  24. WHAT THE HELL IS A "SNILE"? I have formulated a new idea this morning that is great... I share with thee... This is a technique that is used to help train singing through narrowed vowels and improving the articulation of your lyrics when singing high. This technique is also great for resonating to forward positions and amplifying the "cup" of the hard palette. A snile is a cross between a sneer and a smile. It is used in singing to help narrow singing vowels to maintain intrinsic musculature support and stability with amplification, when singing pop / rock music above the passaggio. Mastery of The SNILE will greatly train your kinesthetic feel for narrowing vowels, resonating forward into an "edgier" position, and amplifying while keeping acoustic mass low and balanced. "THE SNILE" is characterized by: A lifting of the upper lip to expose the forward teeth of the embouchure.A "narrowing" of the embouchure, to prevent "splatting".A very strong, amplified, forward resonant position in the "cup" of the hard palette and "edgey pings" off the forward teeth.Must have dampened larynx or anchoring of the larynx. Notice How Geddy Lee of the prog. band, RUSH tracks "Limelight" through the "SNILE"! Who said that "FREE" Secret Tips Didn't Exist?! TRY "THE SNILE" NOW!! ... and post your results here! Video demonstration on "THE SNILE" coming soon... "THE SNILE" is just one idea and technique. It is not a "global" solution for all things singing... it you want to get a feel for forward resonance and narrowing, it is good for that. It can also help you to sing very accurately with great intonation and articulation.