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Found 179 results

  1. A GREAT BOOK ON THE ACOUSTICS OF SINGING I just had a great discussion with Ken Bozeman, the author of the book, "Practical Vocal Acoustics - Pedagogic Applications for Teachers & Singers". We talked a lot about how the CT and TA relate to each other and specifically, what they are doing inside of contemporary belt voice. I think I am lot more clear on CT/TA involvement now and "get it". I also have this book guys. It talks a lot about the acoustics of singing, but is practical and not too difficult to follow. It comes with a CD and a web site you can check into with supporting materials. I highly recommend. I'm posting it here since there was a lot of discussion about CT/TA in here and I think Ken's publication needs to be brought to your attention. CHECK IT OUT! CLICK HERE TO GET THE BOOK! http://www.kenbozeman.com View full article
  2. A GREAT BOOK ON THE ACOUSTICS OF SINGING I just had a great discussion with Ken Bozeman, the author of the book, "Practical Vocal Acoustics - Pedagogic Applications for Teachers & Singers". We talked a lot about how the CT and TA relate to each other and specifically, what they are doing inside of contemporary belt voice. I think I am lot more clear on CT/TA involvement now and "get it". I also have this book guys. It talks a lot about the acoustics of singing, but is practical and not too difficult to follow. It comes with a CD and a web site you can check into with supporting materials. I highly recommend. I'm posting it here since there was a lot of discussion about CT/TA in here and I think Ken's publication needs to be brought to your attention. CHECK IT OUT! CLICK HERE TO GET THE BOOK! http://www.kenbozeman.com
  3. A GREAT BOOK ON THE ACOUSTICS OF SINGING I just had a great discussion with Ken Bozeman, the author of the book, "Practical Vocal Acoustics - Pedagogic Applications for Teachers & Singers". We talked a lot about how the CT and TA relate to each other and specifically, what they are doing inside of contemporary belt voice. I think I am lot more clear on CT/TA involvement now and "get it". I also have this book guys. It talks a lot about the acoustics of singing, but is practical and not too difficult to follow. It comes with a CD and a web site you can check into with supporting materials. I highly recommend. I'm posting it here since there was a lot of discussion about CT/TA in here and I think Ken's publication needs to be brought to your attention. CHECK IT OUT! CLICK HERE TO GET THE BOOK! http://www.kenbozeman.com
  4. Congratulations Shigeki Morimoto! Our new member of the TVS Certified Instructor team from Tokyo, Japan! Shigeki trained for 40 hours in Seattle, WA at TVS studios and took a very difficult TVS test... and English is NOT easy for him! My personal regards, Maestro Morimoto is great for the TVS Instructor program and will represent TVS well in Japan. He knows how to make a full commitment, has a huge work ethic and cares about learning the TVS Method ideas. Maestro Morimoto is also one of the kindest and most pleasant people to be around I have ever met. He also can sing amazing... Welcome Maestro Shigeki Morimoto, our new TVS MCI responsible for Japanese singers, our colleague and friend. Enjoy These Videos We Worked. Engineered, filmed and produced by me... DREAM THEATER TRIBUTE "THE SPIRIT CARRIES ON" SHIGEKI MORIMOTO (ORIGINAL) "WILL BE SHINE"
  5. Enjoy this new video that provides an overview of what vocal modes are and why they are important. If you train and study vocal modes, your understanding of the singing voice and vocal technique will be vastly superior then dealing with training methods that can't explain the physiology and acoustics of singing. The whole point about vocal mode pedagogy is to make the understanding and execution of singing better EASIER, not harder. So don't let anyone tell you that "vocal modes are necessarily too complicated". That is simply not true. If you take a little bit of time to just learn how it works, you will open up a huge door to understanding the voice and singing better. And of course we cover this in The Four Pillars of Singing 4.0! http://bit.ly/TFPOSONLINE. Enjoy this video and hope we can have some discussion about vocal modes.
  6. Chryssanthemis

    Chryssanthemis - Listen (Live)

    "Listen" is οne of four new songs written for the feature version of Dreamgirls (originally a 1981 Broadway musical). Ιt's lyrics make reference to tenacity, love, the refusal to defer dreams and finally rise towards fame.In the film version of Dreamgirls, Knowles portrays the character of Deena Jones, a pop singer loosely based on Motown star Diana Ross. The story explores the life of The Dreamettes (based on The Supremes), a fictional 1960s group of three female singers,whose manager Curtis Taylor (based on Berry Gordy and played by Jamie Foxx) manipulates their personal and professional relationships.I Hope you Enjoy it!Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...Video Editing: Modern Music StudiosElectric Guitar: Steve SovolosPianoAikaterini DeliyiannidouBass Guitar: Dimitris VerginisKeyboards: Kleanthis KonstantinidisDrums: Fotis Yiannopoulos
  7. Chryssanthemis

    Chryssanthemis - At Last (Cover)

    Hello! I want to share with you my Official Cover of the song At Last. Is a song of Etta James which is one of my biggest influences in jazz singing. The song’s lyrics refer to the love of a young woman that’s finally fulfilled. This song encapsulates the youth spirit of 1960’s. First Official Release: November 15,1960 by Etta James.The song was originally written by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren for the musical film Orchestra Wives (1941), starring George Montgomery and Ann Rutherford.I Hope you enjoy it!Recorded - Produced & Mastered at Modern Music Studios Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChryssanthemisModern Music Arts Facebook Page: :https://www.facebook.com/modernmusicartsModern Music Studios Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/modernmusica...www.modernmusicstudios.comby:Chryssanthemis (Chrysanthi Papanikolaou) &Steve Sovolos Video Production: at Modern Music Studios.
  8. A video from Ken Tamplin, voice coach and follow up from Robert Lunte, Voice Coach and producer of The Four Pillars of Singing in regards to SLS and any "sing like you speak" voice training approaches. I agree with Ken on points; 1, 3, 4 The points I don't agree are: #2. "Ah" is not the only vowel that grows the voice... but it is important. We call this the "Neutral" vowel in TVS and we train it. It is great for belting and strength building, but it certainly is NOT the ONLY vowel to train with or to help you. #5. This "meow" example may of not been very helpful, however... there are two elements to that "meow" that have merit in my view. a. Ken DID in fact bridge through his vocal break! If he teacher said, "... do this meow idea to get a good bridge", and then Ken did it and it produced a nice bridge, then...? Didn't it work? But I get Ken's point... he is trying to say that its not applicable to singing... I give you b. b. This "meow" probably has a benefit to LIGHT singing... and in regards to heavier/belt/call register singing,... it does have merits for Training! Maybe not for belt singing, but for TRAINING. You see, some vocal techniques are used ONLY for training. Not all vocal techniques are applicable to singing. I make this point in "The Four Pillars of Singing" on many tables that clarify for students what is applicable for training and what is applicable for singing. Regarding to this "meow" idea for training... /m/ is a nasal consonant and as I point out below... nasal consonants are actually VERY powerful for warming up and training. Nasal consonants induce vocal fold compression and help strengthen the TA muscle and they are just GREAT vocal health. Nasal consonants have a "healing" power to them. They are not only used by voice teachers, (including Ken), but also by ENTs and doctors that are rehabilitating clients with speech problems. So... an onset that starts with any nasal consonant can ONLY be good. The "i/ee" vowel that follows the /m/ ( m + "eeow")... puts the vocal folds into a very strong compression, adduction position. "i/ee", is a good training vowel for building compression strength! In "The Four Pillars of Singing" we have identified this and "named" it. We have 8 specialized onsets (... the way you start in training and singing. Designed for strength building and coordination). One of those specialized onsets is called, "The Quack & Release Onset". The Q&R onset utilizes the i/"ee" vowel to build compression strength. So in summary, while I agree the "meow" may not be super beneficial to people that want to belt, if you look at the consonant and the vowel of "meow", and you understand the benefits of those consonants and vowels and how to utilize them for training, you see past what Ken is pointing out and understand, that there is value there. Provided that you know how to use these consonants and vowels in training. It has a lot to do with understanding consonants and vowels, not only for singing, but what they can do in training, applied to techniques. I think the "sing like you speak" approach, if not in the hands of a more experienced and knowledgeable teacher, can be lacking in several key areas, here are my observations as a coach that has trained this stuff, been teaching for over 15 years and an author and producer of a vocal training program that is a best seller, if you don't mind me saying... 1. It has never embraced research or updating ideas that have evolved. This is why all the top teachers, including your "mentor" Dave Stroud left the organization and all those other teachers. There is a reason why they left... something important to realize. 2. Because of the, "... don't feel anything in your larynx" & "sing like you speak" point of view, it tends to teach fear of the voice. Students are afraid to contract, compress, anchor the larynx and distort. All movements that are perfectly healthy and fine... and if you want to sing "big and boomy" in the head voice, you have to do do these things. 3. There seems to be little to no understanding of vowels and resonance. At least not in a formal, methodological way... any individual teacher may know about it, but as a method, its not there. 4. Relative to #2, for many people, the techniques are too light to really get after the head voice and make it belt... of course this depends on the individual teacher, but as a method, it is really light. That is fine!... but it presents a challenge for people that want to belt high.
  9. A topic where I can embed videos about belt voice... I'm starting to get a few going here... Contact me if you have any questions...
  10. Lexbrooke

    Gary Catona - Opinions?

    Hi all, A little while ago I stumbled on the name Gary Catona through a documentary that was on British television, where he helped a vocalist (Connie Fisher) who had been losing her voice. Ever since I have been researching him and of course his impressive client list. In essence, what he says about strengthening the muscles does seem to make sense but it still leaves me a little confused about 'where to go' and what to use moving forward and of course how it conflicts with everything I have ever been taught. IE: Feeling 'anything' in the throat is a big no no. I am classically trained and have been singing for about 10 years. I have trained using the techniques that Gary says are BAD and will ultimately lead to the destruction of my voice, which leaves a giant question mark hanging over my head. I really want to investigate what he is saying and more to the point, reviews from every day people that his technique has/hasn't worked for. I can't however find any discussions on the guy apart from testimonials that are all good and maybe a few bad Amazon reviews on his DVD. I bought his iPhone app, which seems OK so far but it leaves me confused as to where to go from there? Do I drop all of my previous vocal exercises that I have been doing? For example, he says lip trills are bad.. What about using resonance? What about diaphragm support? What about singing with slightly raised cheeks? What about mouth shape and tongue placement etc etc (he says all support should come from the larynx and that is what controls your breathing) Do I continue the exercises I have known and been doing for years but with the idea of putting more tension on the larynx to strengthen it? Do I 'ONLY' do the exercises Gary provides and then eventually sing (a song) without the added tension with what he says will be a stronger more agile larynx? It just doesn't seem totally clear. I should add, I've had a problem for a little while where the bottom of my voice disappears after I have done a full warm up. It's strong and even resonant at the beginning but as I make my way up to the middle and beyond, when I come back down, it's all over the place and not solid at all. It seems to come back a few hours later but at the time, I just can't produce low notes very well at all. Strengthening those lower muscles (muscle memory too) of course would make sense in helping such a problem. I'm looking for solutions to this and of course trying to work more on the lower notes so they are as strong as the upper. If anyone has any opinions on Gary Catona, whether you've tried his technique yourself or any other thoughts you have on the matter, it would be very interesting to hear! I'm just a singer who wants to do the best for my voice and to make sure I'm not doing myself any damage. I know there can be a lot of conflict in the vocal world with regards to 'how' to do things and what is good and bad for you and it can all get very confusing. For anyone that hasn't heard of the guy, this is his website and also a talk he did at Google. http://www.garycatona.com/ T
  11. Hi everyone I wanna start training with one of the following proggrams 1.ken tamplin 2.singing success/mastering mix Im rock singer I really like myles kennedy and chris cornell Whould like to get ur help to choose. Thanks!
  12. What do you mean by the above, you may ask? What I mean is that the person in question, immediately after recovering their speech (or their singing voice for that matter), goes on the binge marathon. It's like a person who has been on a diet for sometime, after loosing the desirable weight, goes right back to their bad eating habits and binges on everything they were deprived of. No doubts that their lost weight will come back really fast and often double their original weight. Sad? Indeed! But that’s haw the human body works. Similarly, it happens with voice repair clients. They acquire virtually a "verbal diarrhea" And in spite of all my warnings and pleadings, they cannot stop talking until they again become raspy and hoarse! Now they are, so to speak, in their "comfort zone" but upset and frustrated that they have lost their ability to communicate with no pain or strain on their vocal anatomy, like they did during the instruction. Whose fault is that? Obviously their own. They obviously have not followed the recovery protocol, which was thoroughly and strongly advised to them. Who could they blame now? Obviously themselves. However, all of us are human and it is understandable that when we become deprived of something, we want to regain it back real fast and that's where the problem begins. We do not have patience, at least the majority of us. And those who do, we applaud! Nobody would imagine the athlete with an injured leg, (with only a few treatments behind his belt) suddenly start running a marathon! To regain the normal function of any organ, especially the limbs, spine and yes, voice, requires time and a strict regimen. In the case of the voice repair, the person requires to speak much less then before (at least for some time). They have to continuously consume the natural herbs and remedies that were suggested to them. The absolute minimum amount of hours to start the rehab to concur the voice issue would be 30 consecutive hours of unique instruction and natural treatment. For some people that is enough, and they can carry on from there on their own. For others, it requires 2 or even 3 times of repetition of the same and then maintenance - In other words, “tightening the screws” should prevail. It also depends on the severity of the vocal disorder However, the strong and determined people require less repletion and less maintenance. The more healthy and fit people usually have much less struggle with the instruction, treatment and aftermath. Those (with psychological problems and poor diet) require more attention on both parts – instruction and treatment. And, as a rule, they have many more problems during and after the process. Very often, the voice repair clients suffer from many physical and emotional problems, which also contribute to their voice loss and their voice dysfunction. So the voice problem could be a very complicated and deep matter, as the voice loss might be just a symptom of something much more serious going on with the person. Therefore, the voice issue cannot be taken lightly and should be addressed immediately, as it could be an indication of something serious yet to come, for example, a stroke or heart attack. I want my readers to understand the seriousness of any voice disorder and address it, if not medically, then alternatively, as soon as possible.
  13. What an experience I had teaching two masterclasses at Mount Saint Mary's University in Brentwood, California for The Vocalizeu artist intensive week, April 10-19th, 2015. I have to admit, I was extremely nervous as I do not like public speaking. Throw a wig on me and ask me to perform for thousands- that's easy. But speaking about something as divided and controversial as singing technique, well, that's another animal. During the months leading up to the presentation, I was trying to figure out how to present my philosophies about singing not only to a room full of artists, performers, singers, and musicians, but also to a round table of "who's who" in the singing/science of singing community such as Mindy Pack, Dave Stroud, and Karin Titze Cox MA CCC/SLP/Vocologist (Daughter of Dr. Ingo R. Titze- if you don't know him, Google him. He's basically the father of science and practice of voice rehab. Nobody is more in the know of voice than this brilliant man) as well as many other professional teachers. With that being said, I wrote some notes and tried to follow a script. But in the end, I just had a blast helping a lot of singers. Everyone at the Masterclass was so understanding of my nerves. They put me at ease so I was able to explain and demonstrate the tools that I have been using onstage and in my home, scaring my neighbors to death, for the past 25 years. Not to mention my wife and daughter dealing with my ups and downs and keeping me moving forward as an artist. I would like to thank everyone for making this a great experience. A special thanks goes to Mindy Pack for asking me to do this, Dave Stroud for believing in me when I didn't believe in myself, Fawna and Ian for dealing with my horrible internet skills, and lastly Karin Titze Cox for giving me confidence by letting me know that the things I teach and believe in are solid, making it a little bit easier for me to believe in my abilities. Thank you everyone! I can't wait to do more with the VIP Crew! Daniel www.yourvocalteacher.com
  14. Hey all! I recently discovered my two favorite vocalists (Aaron Tveit and Jeremy Jordan) both went to the same music school, and I would love to go there. Unfortunately, the tuition for the school is about $35,000, and I don't think I can afford that. Could private vocal lessons with the right teacher help me just as much? For example, I'm currently trying to sing Thinking Out Loud by Ed Sheeran, and I'm doing it in Bb which is already a full one and a half steps down from the original, but I can't sing the chorus without straining. Wouldn't a vocal teacher be able to help that? Thanks in advance for the help!
  15. I found this cool web site that offers bed tracks for Classical arias and art songs! Check it out! http://www.virtualorchestra.eu
  16. Many teachers will tell you to squeeze your bum cheeks to eliminate strain and to sing higher notes. What do you guys think of this technique, does it work?
  17. For every singer, the question should be; do I possess the distinct tone and the uniqueness of the sound overall?It is easier said than done. Majority of people could carry a tune, but not too many could sing, I mean, really sing. First of all, the person who likes to call him/herself a singer should possess a proper vocal technique, which will allow the singer a freedom to vocalize to their hearts content. They should be able to do it with absolute ease and pleasure, and not to have hardship while trying to deliver their message to their audience. If they don’t know how to work smart, so to speak, and not hard, they also could ruin their voice in the process. And if that happens, their artistic tendencies would not count for anything. Just like in figure skating, the artistic merit is very important, as well as looks, costumes and presence on the ice. But if the skater lands 3 out of 4 jump combinations flat on the ice, the former will not count, and vice versa. So obviously, both technical and artistic merits should be very strong. Similarly in singing, the person might have a strong and powerful voice. That person could even have some knowledge of vocal technique, but his tone is not pleasant, and his passion is not there, so he sounds, quite often, very harsh, loud and robotic. There is nothing unique about that singer and he does not possess any identification of his persona. So his ‘biometric data’ is pretty shut down and obviously not thriving. If that singer performs at the bar, he will find that within the first few minutes, he has “lost” his audience. People are not listening, talking loud, eating and drinking and not paying attention to what’s happening on stage. On the contrary, when there is an artist singing in a bar or in a concert hall, projecting the right power and dynamics, knowledge, intelligence and proper vocal technique, the audience are captured by the singer and stop talking and stop eating….and stop drinking. Interestingly enough, many years ago, I was invited to do a presentation/workshop about the Vocal Science ™ technique in one of downtown Toronto’s venues. The pretty respectable bar was holding some kind of a music related event and I was invited to tell and show to the up and coming artists what the Vocal Science method is all about and how to apply it to the actual singing. The first 15-20 minutes, I thought, were very successful, as the audience was silent and completely taken by me. Then somebody tapped me on the shoulder and asked me to finish my presentation in a short order. I was extremely surprised, as the audience obviously loved it and wanted more. But then, I realized that I was producing an ‘opposite effect’ for the venue: I “took away” their customers, as almost everybody stopped talking, stopped eating, and mainly… stopped drinking. LOL.Obviously, I realized later, and after the fact, that the whole Idea for that bar was to invite as many drinking musicians as the capacity would allow. Go figure! In any other occasion, it would be considered as a desirable outcome, and so it should be! So if your biometrics are intact, your vocal technique is impeccable and your passion and desire is present, you will be remembered as, in this instance, your tone will be unique and your sound will be distinct. Achieving all of the above, consider your entire being (voice included, nevertheless) fully optimized!
  18. Song selection is sometimes the most important factor in an audition preparation. What type of song you pick depends entirely on what you audition for. Here is what to consider. Musical: Take time to get to know the show. Choose who you want to be and pick a difficult song from another show by a similar character. For instance, if you want to be Marian in Music Man, find a piece similar to her hardest solo, “My White Knight.” Several aspects of the song are difficult, but focus on singing something in the same vocal range and style. Opera: Whether you audition for the chorus or as a soloist makes a big difference in the world of opera. You may sing one selection to sing in the chorus, and at least two to sing solo. Pick an aria in German, Italian, English, or French. Do not audition with an art song. Typically as a soloist, you pick one aria to perform and prepare and list several others for the casting director to pick from. List at least one serious and one funny selection, represent several languages, pick arias from several periods (Mozart, Rossini, Massenet), and be prepared to sing whatever they ask you to. Jazz Gig: With jazz gigs, most managers expect you to either play the piano yourself or provide your own live accompaniment. Be proactive and ask at restaurants or department stores whether you may audition. They may want background music or a main attraction. Try to find out before the audition, so you can select music accordingly. Prepare at least 30-45 minutes of repertoire for a performance. If you are hired for a longer period of time, just take a break, and then run your set again
  19. Hello All: I thought that since I have not seen much on TMV regarding SLS or Speech Level Singing, which is the technique pioneered and taught by the master vocal teacher and one of my greatest teachers ever, Seth Riggs, I would post an introduction to the principles of SLS for everyone to read and learn from. Introduction to Speech Level Singing Overview Speech Level Singing is not new. It is a technique devised and originated by Seth Riggs of Los Angeles, California that has produced over 100 Grammy winners and many Metropolitan Opera winners. Seth Riggs is the most renowned voice teacher and vocal technician in the industry of performing arts and teaches around the world. Some names of famous singers who use this technique are Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Luther Vandross, Madonna, Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams, Michael Bolton, Janet Jackson, Bonnie Raitt, Ricky Martin, Julie Andrews, Connie Stevens, Bernedette Peters, Natalie Cole and many, many others who are in the singing industry today. Some of the groups who have worked with SLS are Kiss, The Eurythmics, Chicago, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Aerosmith, etc. Speech Level Singing is a technique that allows a person to sing with a "free voice." The only muscles that are engaged when singing with this technique are the muscles attached to the vocal cords, inside the voice box (larynx), i.e., the muscles of speech, as well as keeping the larynx at the level of speech production, hence the term "Speech Level Singing." It allows you to sing freely and clearly anywhere in your range with all your words clearly understood. Since you are not learning what to sing but rather HOW to sing, you can apply this technique to ANY type of music. Simply put, Speech Level Singing states that if the larynx stays down and the vocal cords stay together from the very bottom of the vocal range to the very top everything is fine. This also applies to all vowel and consonant combinations through out any phrase. If at any point the larynx jumps up or down or the tone becomes breathy then there is something wrong with the vocal process. The larynx is the big bump in the middle of the neck just below the chin. This houses the vocal cords and controls the process of swallowing. When the larynx moves up, the muscles around the cords act as a sphincter and closes so as to prevent swallowing down the windpipe and into the lungs. This is a very important process when you need to swallow, but it is a very poor process when you are trying to sing. If you place your hand on your larynx and yawn, you will find that you can bring your larynx down as well. This is a good way to learn what it feels like to have the larynx stay down. The end goal here is to be able to keep the larynx from moving too far down as well as too far up. It should stay in a fairly stable and speech level position as you ascend and descend. This is a very brief and condensed version of SLS, there is obviously a lot more to it. But, to give you an idea of what is correct, take these two ideas and while you are singing, monitor them. See if you can keep your larynx stable and your cords together. You will probably find that there is a certain area of your voice that is easy for you to accomplish this, and certain points of your voice that are more difficult. These harder areas are called bridges. Breathing Breathing for singing is a very relaxed process. When it is said that you can regulate it, what is meant is that you allow it to happen so that inhalation and exhalation are done in a way that best suits your musical needs. You do not have to work at breathing correctly unless you have poor posture or a tendency to raise your chest and shoulders and take shallow breaths. Your diaphragm, rib muscles and abdominal muscles are already strong enough for your needs as a singer. If you maintain good posture when you sing, and are careful not to let your chest collapse as you exhale, your diaphragm is able to move freely and be regulated by your abdominal muscles automatically. There is no need to consciously exert tension in those muscles. If you do try to directly control your breathing muscles when you sing, the extra tension in your body will only cause your vocal cords to overtense and jam up. Very little air is required to produce a good tone. Even for a loud tone, the amount of air you use need only be enough to support the vibration of your vocal cords no more, no less so that your tone is produced without any effort or strain. Just as trying to control your breathing muscles directly will cause your vocal cords to jam up, so will using too much air. That's because when you sing, your cords are instinctively committed to holding back (or at least trying to hold back) any amount of air you send their way. And the more air you send them, the tighter your cords have to get to hold it back. Also, this is when the outer muscles around your larynx will assist the cords by pulling on and tightening around your larynx in order to hold back the excess of air blasted at your cords. You know you have proper breath support when there is a balance between air and muscle. There will be a mutual and simultaneous coordination of the proper amount of air with the proper adjustment of your vocal cords. Bridges A bridge is a spot where resonation shifts from one area of your body to another (for example, from your chest to your head). Another term for a bridge is the Italian word for passage, passagie (passagio when plural). When you hear the word passagie, you are hearing a reference to a bridge. Knowing where your bridges are can really help you smooth out the resonation from one area of your body to the next. Bridges take place in different spots for men and women, but they are fairly universal within a gender. We will deal with four areas of resonation: the first is chest voice, the second is mix voice, the third is head voice, and the final is super head voice. All combine to create ONE FULL VOICE. Men's Bridges Men, with the exception of basses or dramatic baritones, start their first bridge at E-flat above a keyboard's middle C. This is the first note in the mixing or blending area of the voice (a blend of chest voice and head voice), and each chromatic move up will transition the voice toward a headier position and sound. The male vocalist will not feel completely in his head voice until an A or B-flat. This is where the second bridge is. This second bridge goes from A or B-flat above a keyboard's middle C to D above the keyboard's high C. Women's Bridges Women's bridges are similar to men's: they exist within approximately an augmented 4th interval. But they begin where a man's second bridge is. So, generally speaking, a woman's first bridge is on a A or B flat above the keyboard middle C. Below this is a woman's chest voice, and above this, up to a D, is mix voice. Once a female vocalist hits an E-flat (or sometimes an E), she is in head voice. Strictly on a technical level, a woman shouldn't sing completely in head voice until an E-flat. This area of resonation will continue up to an A or B-flat below a keyboard's double-high C. This third bridge puts the female singer in a super head voice, and she will stay in that until she reaches an E-flat above a keyboard's double-high C. When singing most songs, women don't need to go much past this fourth bridge, but there are a few more bridges beyond this fourth bridge. Once again, they are at intervals of an augmented fourth above the E-flat above a keyboard's double high C: the fifth bridge is on A, and the sixth is on the E-flat above that. These last two areas of resonation are known as the whistle range, and as I stated, most women don't use these areas, but they do exist and can be developed. Crossing Bridges You may have heard about vocal-cord adduction and the need to develop good cord closure. It is essential that the vocal cords stay together as a singer crosses the bridges. Your first bridge is the most critical. It's where the outer muscles (if they haven't done so already) are most likely to enter into the adjustment process. When they do, they pull on and tighten around the outside of the larynx in an effort to stretch the vocal cords to get the necessary tension for the pitch or volume level you require. Stretching your cords in this manner causes your entire singing mechanism tone and words to jam up! Fortunately, there is an easier and much better way to stretch your vocal cords to achieve the necessary tensions without disrupting your tone-making process or your word-making process. The key is to do less in order to do more. To be specific, the higher you sing, the less air you should use. When you reduce the amount of air you send to your vocal cords, you make it possible for the muscles inside your larynx to stretch your vocal cords by themselves. Your outer muscles are less likely to interfere because there isn't as much air to hold back. Your outer muscles will interfere in the vibration process whenever you use more air than your vocal cords and the other muscles inside your larynx are able to handle. As the pitch ascends, sound traveling from the vocal cords shifts paths. Chest voice travels to the hard palate and out of the mouth. As the pitch rises and goes over the first bridge, the sound begins to split, going behind the soft palate as well as to the hard palate. This is a balancing act of sorts. If too much sound is traveling in front of the soft palate and out of the mouth, the result will be a wide vowel and what is called pulled chest. A residual result will be a high larynx. The right balance depends on which note within the mix is being sung. By the time you're completely in head voice, much of the sound will be traveling behind the soft palate before exiting the skull. Each time a singer reaches a bridge, more sound must pass behind the soft palate and more resonation within the skull should take place. Singers resist letting sound pass behind the soft palate for a couple of reasons: The first is that they hear the tone bouncing within the skull and feel that it sounds too ringy. They don't realize that the sound they're hearing is not what the audience is hearing. They're picking up this sound through the skull, not from within the room they're singing in. One way to deal with this is to record yourself passing into mix and head voice; then play back what you've recorded. You will hear the difference between how you really sounded and the sound you heard resonating in your head. The second reason for resistance is that many singers get used to feeling that they have to muscle notes. As you learn to master the bridges, you'll feel very little pressure. There is compression from the diaphragm and resistance from the cords being held together, but there will not be any tightness in the neck or under the chin. This lack of pressure can be unfamiliar and uncomfortable for many singers and even feel a bit precarious, especially if the strength in the mix is not quite there. Once again, recording an arpeggio that ascends into the head voice and playing it back can shed some light on the relationship between what a certain note sounds like and what it should feel like as you sing it. View full articles
  20. TMV World Team

    Introduction to Speech Level Singing

    Hello All: I thought that since I have not seen much on TMV regarding SLS or Speech Level Singing, which is the technique pioneered and taught by the master vocal teacher and one of my greatest teachers ever, Seth Riggs, I would post an introduction to the principles of SLS for everyone to read and learn from. Introduction to Speech Level Singing Overview Speech Level Singing is not new. It is a technique devised and originated by Seth Riggs of Los Angeles, California that has produced over 100 Grammy winners and many Metropolitan Opera winners. Seth Riggs is the most renowned voice teacher and vocal technician in the industry of performing arts and teaches around the world. Some names of famous singers who use this technique are Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Luther Vandross, Madonna, Janet Jackson, Bryan Adams, Michael Bolton, Janet Jackson, Bonnie Raitt, Ricky Martin, Julie Andrews, Connie Stevens, Bernedette Peters, Natalie Cole and many, many others who are in the singing industry today. Some of the groups who have worked with SLS are Kiss, The Eurythmics, Chicago, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Aerosmith, etc. Speech Level Singing is a technique that allows a person to sing with a "free voice." The only muscles that are engaged when singing with this technique are the muscles attached to the vocal cords, inside the voice box (larynx), i.e., the muscles of speech, as well as keeping the larynx at the level of speech production, hence the term "Speech Level Singing." It allows you to sing freely and clearly anywhere in your range with all your words clearly understood. Since you are not learning what to sing but rather HOW to sing, you can apply this technique to ANY type of music. Simply put, Speech Level Singing states that if the larynx stays down and the vocal cords stay together from the very bottom of the vocal range to the very top everything is fine. This also applies to all vowel and consonant combinations through out any phrase. If at any point the larynx jumps up or down or the tone becomes breathy then there is something wrong with the vocal process. The larynx is the big bump in the middle of the neck just below the chin. This houses the vocal cords and controls the process of swallowing. When the larynx moves up, the muscles around the cords act as a sphincter and closes so as to prevent swallowing down the windpipe and into the lungs. This is a very important process when you need to swallow, but it is a very poor process when you are trying to sing. If you place your hand on your larynx and yawn, you will find that you can bring your larynx down as well. This is a good way to learn what it feels like to have the larynx stay down. The end goal here is to be able to keep the larynx from moving too far down as well as too far up. It should stay in a fairly stable and speech level position as you ascend and descend. This is a very brief and condensed version of SLS, there is obviously a lot more to it. But, to give you an idea of what is correct, take these two ideas and while you are singing, monitor them. See if you can keep your larynx stable and your cords together. You will probably find that there is a certain area of your voice that is easy for you to accomplish this, and certain points of your voice that are more difficult. These harder areas are called bridges. Breathing Breathing for singing is a very relaxed process. When it is said that you can regulate it, what is meant is that you allow it to happen so that inhalation and exhalation are done in a way that best suits your musical needs. You do not have to work at breathing correctly unless you have poor posture or a tendency to raise your chest and shoulders and take shallow breaths. Your diaphragm, rib muscles and abdominal muscles are already strong enough for your needs as a singer. If you maintain good posture when you sing, and are careful not to let your chest collapse as you exhale, your diaphragm is able to move freely and be regulated by your abdominal muscles automatically. There is no need to consciously exert tension in those muscles. If you do try to directly control your breathing muscles when you sing, the extra tension in your body will only cause your vocal cords to overtense and jam up. Very little air is required to produce a good tone. Even for a loud tone, the amount of air you use need only be enough to support the vibration of your vocal cords no more, no less so that your tone is produced without any effort or strain. Just as trying to control your breathing muscles directly will cause your vocal cords to jam up, so will using too much air. That's because when you sing, your cords are instinctively committed to holding back (or at least trying to hold back) any amount of air you send their way. And the more air you send them, the tighter your cords have to get to hold it back. Also, this is when the outer muscles around your larynx will assist the cords by pulling on and tightening around your larynx in order to hold back the excess of air blasted at your cords. You know you have proper breath support when there is a balance between air and muscle. There will be a mutual and simultaneous coordination of the proper amount of air with the proper adjustment of your vocal cords. Bridges A bridge is a spot where resonation shifts from one area of your body to another (for example, from your chest to your head). Another term for a bridge is the Italian word for passage, passagie (passagio when plural). When you hear the word passagie, you are hearing a reference to a bridge. Knowing where your bridges are can really help you smooth out the resonation from one area of your body to the next. Bridges take place in different spots for men and women, but they are fairly universal within a gender. We will deal with four areas of resonation: the first is chest voice, the second is mix voice, the third is head voice, and the final is super head voice. All combine to create ONE FULL VOICE. Men's Bridges Men, with the exception of basses or dramatic baritones, start their first bridge at E-flat above a keyboard's middle C. This is the first note in the mixing or blending area of the voice (a blend of chest voice and head voice), and each chromatic move up will transition the voice toward a headier position and sound. The male vocalist will not feel completely in his head voice until an A or B-flat. This is where the second bridge is. This second bridge goes from A or B-flat above a keyboard's middle C to D above the keyboard's high C. Women's Bridges Women's bridges are similar to men's: they exist within approximately an augmented 4th interval. But they begin where a man's second bridge is. So, generally speaking, a woman's first bridge is on a A or B flat above the keyboard middle C. Below this is a woman's chest voice, and above this, up to a D, is mix voice. Once a female vocalist hits an E-flat (or sometimes an E), she is in head voice. Strictly on a technical level, a woman shouldn't sing completely in head voice until an E-flat. This area of resonation will continue up to an A or B-flat below a keyboard's double-high C. This third bridge puts the female singer in a super head voice, and she will stay in that until she reaches an E-flat above a keyboard's double-high C. When singing most songs, women don't need to go much past this fourth bridge, but there are a few more bridges beyond this fourth bridge. Once again, they are at intervals of an augmented fourth above the E-flat above a keyboard's double high C: the fifth bridge is on A, and the sixth is on the E-flat above that. These last two areas of resonation are known as the whistle range, and as I stated, most women don't use these areas, but they do exist and can be developed. Crossing Bridges You may have heard about vocal-cord adduction and the need to develop good cord closure. It is essential that the vocal cords stay together as a singer crosses the bridges. Your first bridge is the most critical. It's where the outer muscles (if they haven't done so already) are most likely to enter into the adjustment process. When they do, they pull on and tighten around the outside of the larynx in an effort to stretch the vocal cords to get the necessary tension for the pitch or volume level you require. Stretching your cords in this manner causes your entire singing mechanism tone and words to jam up! Fortunately, there is an easier and much better way to stretch your vocal cords to achieve the necessary tensions without disrupting your tone-making process or your word-making process. The key is to do less in order to do more. To be specific, the higher you sing, the less air you should use. When you reduce the amount of air you send to your vocal cords, you make it possible for the muscles inside your larynx to stretch your vocal cords by themselves. Your outer muscles are less likely to interfere because there isn't as much air to hold back. Your outer muscles will interfere in the vibration process whenever you use more air than your vocal cords and the other muscles inside your larynx are able to handle. As the pitch ascends, sound traveling from the vocal cords shifts paths. Chest voice travels to the hard palate and out of the mouth. As the pitch rises and goes over the first bridge, the sound begins to split, going behind the soft palate as well as to the hard palate. This is a balancing act of sorts. If too much sound is traveling in front of the soft palate and out of the mouth, the result will be a wide vowel and what is called pulled chest. A residual result will be a high larynx. The right balance depends on which note within the mix is being sung. By the time you're completely in head voice, much of the sound will be traveling behind the soft palate before exiting the skull. Each time a singer reaches a bridge, more sound must pass behind the soft palate and more resonation within the skull should take place. Singers resist letting sound pass behind the soft palate for a couple of reasons: The first is that they hear the tone bouncing within the skull and feel that it sounds too ringy. They don't realize that the sound they're hearing is not what the audience is hearing. They're picking up this sound through the skull, not from within the room they're singing in. One way to deal with this is to record yourself passing into mix and head voice; then play back what you've recorded. You will hear the difference between how you really sounded and the sound you heard resonating in your head. The second reason for resistance is that many singers get used to feeling that they have to muscle notes. As you learn to master the bridges, you'll feel very little pressure. There is compression from the diaphragm and resistance from the cords being held together, but there will not be any tightness in the neck or under the chin. This lack of pressure can be unfamiliar and uncomfortable for many singers and even feel a bit precarious, especially if the strength in the mix is not quite there. Once again, recording an arpeggio that ascends into the head voice and playing it back can shed some light on the relationship between what a certain note sounds like and what it should feel like as you sing it.
  21. TMV World Team

    ArticlesTraining vs. Teaching

    So what does a student need? They need to be able to do all of the physical tasks that constitute the singing activity required by their goals. This requires training, even if no trainer is available. In addition, their goals will require them to develop the musicianship and experience to handle styles, inflection, and ornamentation appropriate for the music they want to do. This requires learning, even if no teacher is available. In school and at home, we were told many times to "Think about what you are doing!" That approach is almost completely counter-productive for musicians and high wire walkers. Imagine the effect of yelling "Think about what you're doing!" to a person walking a wire across the Grand Canyon. The free-flow execution of skills is managed by a part of the brain that is totally different from the part of the brain where knowledge and understanding are applied to currently executing skills. Once a performer starts thinking about what they are doing, the analytical part of the brain begins to interfere with the free-flow part of the brain. If you as a teacher explain everything, you are implying that singing skills can be managed by the intellect, which is actually impossible beyond a beginner level. I'm not saying that teaching about the subject of singing technique has no value. A voice teacher needs to really know and understand the subject. However, I am suggesting that you carefully consider how much and when to teach a student "about" singing technique. My friend, Robert Lunte, says that singers need to train as "vocal athletes," and I totally agree. The great athletes don't become great by approaching their skills analytically. Their trainers focus on the physical and mental demands of specific skills, and they train the muscles to do the job. The great trainers also train the athlete's mind to concentrate in ways that don't interfere with the fluency of their physical skills. Princeton says that "training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies." I like that definition, but I would boil it down a bit and say that personal voice training is leading someone through exercises and experiences that develop the skills to achieve specific goals and acquire the knowledge required to execute those skills in the required styles. For more information about The Performing Mind, go to http://www.pfco.com. Michael Kysar The Performing Mind http://www.pfco.com View full articles
  22. TMV World Team

    Training vs. Teaching

    So what does a student need? They need to be able to do all of the physical tasks that constitute the singing activity required by their goals. This requires training, even if no trainer is available. In addition, their goals will require them to develop the musicianship and experience to handle styles, inflection, and ornamentation appropriate for the music they want to do. This requires learning, even if no teacher is available. In school and at home, we were told many times to "Think about what you are doing!" That approach is almost completely counter-productive for musicians and high wire walkers. Imagine the effect of yelling "Think about what you're doing!" to a person walking a wire across the Grand Canyon. The free-flow execution of skills is managed by a part of the brain that is totally different from the part of the brain where knowledge and understanding are applied to currently executing skills. Once a performer starts thinking about what they are doing, the analytical part of the brain begins to interfere with the free-flow part of the brain. If you as a teacher explain everything, you are implying that singing skills can be managed by the intellect, which is actually impossible beyond a beginner level. I'm not saying that teaching about the subject of singing technique has no value. A voice teacher needs to really know and understand the subject. However, I am suggesting that you carefully consider how much and when to teach a student "about" singing technique. My friend, Robert Lunte, says that singers need to train as "vocal athletes," and I totally agree. The great athletes don't become great by approaching their skills analytically. Their trainers focus on the physical and mental demands of specific skills, and they train the muscles to do the job. The great trainers also train the athlete's mind to concentrate in ways that don't interfere with the fluency of their physical skills. Princeton says that "training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relate to specific useful competencies." I like that definition, but I would boil it down a bit and say that personal voice training is leading someone through exercises and experiences that develop the skills to achieve specific goals and acquire the knowledge required to execute those skills in the required styles. For more information about The Performing Mind, go to http://www.pfco.com. Michael Kysar The Performing Mind http://www.pfco.com
  23. TMV World Team

    Who is THE BEST TEACHER In The World?

    For the starting out vocalist, or even for the professional at anything, I don't think there is one bestanyone. Vocalists, Performers, Teachers/Coaches, and most anyone I know has had their dreams. In our youth the dreams are, for the most part, grandiose. For a very small few, they aren't. For whatever reasons, those people hit it big. I like to think it's destiny, but who knows? Ego deflation has taken its time on me. I don't know about anyone else, but I am one of those people who had to be brought down to what I call "right size." Yes, okay, it wasn't pretty, but I came to accept something that made me very happy. I am THE BEST teacher for those who find their way to me. It's that simple. For those singers who come to learn from me in my 'lab,' I invest everything I have to give. For myself, I've learned I really can't afford to take students on just for money. I want to be teaching those who are sincerely hungry to learn. In my practice, I've noticed many 'a confused' student. They come not having been able to understand so many things after so many lessons with other instructors.Often its' because of misperception with semantics when, in reality, we are all trying to teach right way. With my own clientele, I've found it important to not only learn how to explain things using the right words, but to also learn how to communicate on different levels. My dictionaries have been quite useful with this. The "just do it" method never worked for me, so why would I think it would work for my students? In my mind, it's like when I was a kid and asked my parents, "Why?" and they came back at me with "because I said so." Some students don't even understand why they even have to bother practicing vocalises just because they've never understood the reasoning behind it. "Learn by do" is one of my mottos, but we also have to have some intellectual understanding of how things work or the puzzle pieces won't come together when physically experienced. It all has to make sense. The AH HA moments come when someone has repeatedly physically experienced right way. I teach a lot of foreigners. There are a lot of words they don't understand. This is where my acting (used to be an actress -- long story) and my willingness to look ridiculous comes in handy. Often I have to imitate the unnatural ways in which a singer is trying to go after something, exxagerate it so much that they get the point. It never fails that we both end up laughing hysterically in these moments. And to me, laughter is so healing, so important. It's also surprising ( at least to me) that those who are famous, have the money to spend, and don't sing well 'live' aren't doing the research to find the teachers who are equipped to fix such problems. I'd be embarrassed to have someone running around telling people, "I took lessons with Dena Murray" if I hadn't corrected such things. Additionally, it's such a let-down for fans to hear that their favorites need so much technology just to be able sound as good as they do on their CDs. It leaves those who are really trying to learn something feeling badly about themselves (their investment), and wondering about their own journeys. I don't like to judge whey anyone has chosen to take voice lessons. There may be reasons that none of us may know until it's time to part ways --and personally, I don't want to be the type who tries to hang on to someone just because I might need money. At that point, there would not only be an undercurrent of resistance, but trying to learn anything would prove unproductive. Besides, it doesn't make room for someone else who might need my service. As instructors, most all are trying to teach the same things and not hurt anyone's voice. In that way, we are all one. I also believe it to be very true that each and every one of has something very unique to bring to the table and that this is what separates us. I have not only learned multitudes from other teachers, methods, and books, I have also learned from my students. I'm not just a professional instructor of voice, I am also still a professional student. I love the challenge of learning new things; challenging my own self. All of that said, it is a privilege to be on this site, an honor to be able to work with such a supportive, professional, gifted, and accomplished group of people. And, if any of you singers find yourself with a teacher who doesn't necessarily 'click 'for you, remember that sometimes it takes having a 'wrong fit' to realize when you've found the right one. I thank all of you for your gifts and the willingness to share them.
  24. For the starting out vocalist, or even for the professional at anything, I don't think there is one bestanyone. Vocalists, Performers, Teachers/Coaches, and most anyone I know has had their dreams. In our youth the dreams are, for the most part, grandiose. For a very small few, they aren't. For whatever reasons, those people hit it big. I like to think it's destiny, but who knows? Ego deflation has taken its time on me. I don't know about anyone else, but I am one of those people who had to be brought down to what I call "right size." Yes, okay, it wasn't pretty, but I came to accept something that made me very happy. I am THE BEST teacher for those who find their way to me. It's that simple. For those singers who come to learn from me in my 'lab,' I invest everything I have to give. For myself, I've learned I really can't afford to take students on just for money. I want to be teaching those who are sincerely hungry to learn. In my practice, I've noticed many 'a confused' student. They come not having been able to understand so many things after so many lessons with other instructors.Often its' because of misperception with semantics when, in reality, we are all trying to teach right way. With my own clientele, I've found it important to not only learn how to explain things using the right words, but to also learn how to communicate on different levels. My dictionaries have been quite useful with this. The "just do it" method never worked for me, so why would I think it would work for my students? In my mind, it's like when I was a kid and asked my parents, "Why?" and they came back at me with "because I said so." Some students don't even understand why they even have to bother practicing vocalises just because they've never understood the reasoning behind it. "Learn by do" is one of my mottos, but we also have to have some intellectual understanding of how things work or the puzzle pieces won't come together when physically experienced. It all has to make sense. The AH HA moments come when someone has repeatedly physically experienced right way. I teach a lot of foreigners. There are a lot of words they don't understand. This is where my acting (used to be an actress -- long story) and my willingness to look ridiculous comes in handy. Often I have to imitate the unnatural ways in which a singer is trying to go after something, exxagerate it so much that they get the point. It never fails that we both end up laughing hysterically in these moments. And to me, laughter is so healing, so important. It's also surprising ( at least to me) that those who are famous, have the money to spend, and don't sing well 'live' aren't doing the research to find the teachers who are equipped to fix such problems. I'd be embarrassed to have someone running around telling people, "I took lessons with Dena Murray" if I hadn't corrected such things. Additionally, it's such a let-down for fans to hear that their favorites need so much technology just to be able sound as good as they do on their CDs. It leaves those who are really trying to learn something feeling badly about themselves (their investment), and wondering about their own journeys. I don't like to judge whey anyone has chosen to take voice lessons. There may be reasons that none of us may know until it's time to part ways --and personally, I don't want to be the type who tries to hang on to someone just because I might need money. At that point, there would not only be an undercurrent of resistance, but trying to learn anything would prove unproductive. Besides, it doesn't make room for someone else who might need my service. As instructors, most all are trying to teach the same things and not hurt anyone's voice. In that way, we are all one. I also believe it to be very true that each and every one of has something very unique to bring to the table and that this is what separates us. I have not only learned multitudes from other teachers, methods, and books, I have also learned from my students. I'm not just a professional instructor of voice, I am also still a professional student. I love the challenge of learning new things; challenging my own self. All of that said, it is a privilege to be on this site, an honor to be able to work with such a supportive, professional, gifted, and accomplished group of people. And, if any of you singers find yourself with a teacher who doesn't necessarily 'click 'for you, remember that sometimes it takes having a 'wrong fit' to realize when you've found the right one. I thank all of you for your gifts and the willingness to share them. View full articles