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  1. Robert Lunte - The Wreck of The Edmund Fitzgerald I ALWAYS LOVED THIS SONG FOR ITS EXTRAORDINARY STORY-TELLING MERITS. THIS IS A TRUE STORY ABOUT THE TANKER SHIP, EDMUND FITZGERALD, A TANKER SHIP THAT SUNK IN LAKE SUPERIOR IN A STORM. IT IS A GREAT STORY TO TELL AND I HOPE YOU ENJOY IT. BTW, ANYTIME YOU WANT TO GIVE A SONG A MARITIME FEEL, PUT IT IN 3/4 TIME. WORKS EVERY TIME. ENJOY! AS ALWAYS, BE SURE TO LISTEN WITH HEADPHONES FOR MAXIMUM EFFECTS.
  2. Introduction Introduction: When it comes to writing good travel essays, there are a few things everyone should keep in mind. First and foremost, your audience is important. You want to be sure that your essay targets the right people, so make sure you’re clear about what you’re trying to achieve. Additionally, make sure you have a strong argument for your choices. If you can show readers how your travel experiences changed or informed your thinking about the world, they’ll be more likely to read and engage with your work. Finally, make sure you’re prepared for feedback—especially if you plan on submitting it for consideration. How to Write Good Travel Essays. In order to be a good travel writer for us, you have to understand the process of writing. This includes understanding the different types of writing, how to structure your essay, and how to make sure your paper is well-written. There are three main ways you can write a good travel essay: personal, historical, and analytical. Personal essays focus on the individual traveler and their experiences while traveling. Historical essays look at the history behind traveling destinations or global events. Analyses provide deep insights into a destination or topic that may be difficult for others to understand. To write a good travel essay, make sure you understand the process of writing before beginning. You should also familiarize yourself with the different types of writing so that you can create an effective paper. Finally, make sure your paper is well-written by following these tips: 1. Use clear language and concise sentences when describing your experience while traveling. 2. Be concise and informative when discussing global events or destinations. 3. Make use of strong verbs and nouns when describing your travels - this will help people understand what you’re saying more easily. How to Write a Good Travel Essay. When writing a good travelog, it’s important to find the right story. For example, if you’re writing about a trip to Japan, you might choose to focus on the culture and the unique experiences that your friends and family were able to experience. On the other hand, if you’re writing about a trip to Italy, you might choose to focus on the harsh realities of life in this ancient city. The key is to find a balance that will make your readers want to read more of your Travels. Write a Good Layout When designing your travelog, it’s important to keep things easy-to-read and concise. You don’t want your readers fighting through dense language or struggling with complex concepts. Instead, use easy-to-parse language that still makes sense overall. For example, when describing an attraction or city, use terms like “site[s] of interest” or “historic sites.” When discussing food and drink, focus on what was tasted rather than how it was prepared (e.g., “The appetizer consisted of soft boiled eggs splash of soy sauce and scallions onigiri radiata wrapped in Nori seaweed).” Write a Good Story In addition to choosing a good layout and story line, it also helps to write an engaging travelog that will capture reader attention from start to finish. Your readers should be engaged from beginning until end – try not to leave them hanging after leaving your destination! By following these tips, you can help make sure your travels are both informative and enjoyable for all involved. Tips for Writing Good Travel Essays. When writing a travel essay, make sure to use proper grammar. Use strong verbs and verb tenses, avoid common errors, and use correctly placed words. For example, when referring to another country or city: "I spent my vacation in Barcelona," "I visited Barcelona during my vacation," "Barcelona is a famous tourist destination which I enjoyed." "It was great to spend the day in Barcelona with my family." Conclusion Writing good travel essays can be a difficult task, but with the right tools and techniques you can make it a breeze. Use proper grammar, use effective expressions, and write engaging stories to make your writing stand out. Finally, make sure to provide appropriate titles so that readers will know what to look for in your essay. Thanks for reading!
  3. Hi, I'm 26 years old. Since I went through puberty in my early teenage years I could hit quite a good F2, sometimes E2 on a good day or in the mornings, but the F#2 was always strong and consistent every single day. (Just for clarity I will say that I am going to specifically talk about full voice here, excluding vocal fry or head voice). A little over a year ago I've noticed that I had lost a large part of my low range. F#2 was basically all vocal fry and G2, once an extremely strong note in my range has become really weak. The chord closure is there in every note, it's just as if I simply lost the ability to sing that low. Also apart from the range becoming limited all the low notes now sound much weaker. What I also noticed is that it got easier for me to get up in my range, notes like F#2 or G4 which were before very strained and shouty are now way easier to sing, but it's not like I gained any range either, just the top notes of my range are now way more usable. What's interesting is that it varies a lot from day to day. Today for example I can barely sing an A2 or an A#2 without going into vocal fry, my lowest strong and full note is basically a B2. But there are days when I can sing a strong and loud A2. My question is has anyone else experienced a sudden change like this. Or maybe you have an idea about what can be the cause? Thank you all in advance. Aleksander.
  4. Mixed voice is my main problem in singing. I probably can sing very high mixed, but I cannot bridge this high mixed with chest voice. I cannot sing mixed below A4, and my high mixed is too nasal, it's not brutal enough for me. Some crying, baby sounds don't help me because I cannot make them more chest and they don't bridge with my chest voice as well. I'm attaching the examples. I can belt D4 but if I try higher notes, I just start yelling. Attempts.mp3
  5. So I just saw this video It's about the maximum resonance point which is the note range in which your voice sounds the most relaxed, confident and likeable. In order to find which notes are my maximum resonance point I'm supposed to figure out why my comfortable note range is. This sounds self explanotory but I'm not sure if I'm doing it right. Finding my deepest comfortable note is easy, but the highest is not. I'm not good at bridging so I have a comfortable note range right before I switch from chest to head voice and then a few notes after having bridged, speaking in the higher voice is comfortable again for a few notes. So I'm not sure if my comfortable range is up to the note where I have to bridge or up to my highest comfortable head note. I'd really appreaciate all yours insight into this topic
  6. Hello, I'm a baritone. I'm only 15, so that could change, who knows, but I've been looking into extending my range downwards and have had good results. My normal range is from F2-C5, although once warmed up I can get a D2 that's very unstable, but not fry. I learned about "Subharmonics", and decided to try them out. After about a week I've developed the technique to take me down to a G1, ugly it may be. The reason I'm posting here is because during this week, I've developed a strange... "partial" on my voice. (I'm a brass player, so this is the only way I know to say how it feels.) This partial starts at C2, and ends at about D1-E1, and I don't think its fry. It's not as pretty as say a full chest voice, however, its very connected and not separated like fry tends to be. Its hard to control, but it's there. Is this some type of fry I've randomly developed? Is it maybe subharmonics that I've somehow figured out? Any input? Very curious.
  7. Hello fellow singers! I've taken on this classic for my latest: If you enjoy, please share, like, and subscribe! Thank you.
  8. A study on one of my favorite songs, by my favorite singer
  9. Is "mixed voice" closer to something like A or B. A: A soft, speech-like yell. Today I felt I was shouting in my lesson and my teacher said that was my mix. I don't mean shouting as in yelling and forcing as if someone was stabbing you, but to get someone's attention across the street or at a baseball game. B: Pretty much a connected head voice sound but with a slightly raised larynx than opera. In other words just making the head voice sound chestier. So it will feel like I am singing in pure head voice with but just with a speech-like larynx or twang? Is mix literally singing in chest and head at the same time, or singing in head voice with twang so it sounds powerful and full and indistinguishable from chest voice? I would like replies from singers who are not just starting out but have experience and can actually sing in a balanced 'mix'. Thanks
  10. I am a singer (classically trained, but culturally a singer of soul/gospel/r&b). I lead worship weekly on Sundays and have realized that I find it much easier to remain pitch accurate it my head voice than in chest. Is this common? Is anyone able to share the science behind why? (Ps. In classical music I am a low voice - I sing baritone, but in popular music I vary in range as a tenor, as gospel often has tenors in high vocal ranges, and I’m pretty comfortable there as long as my technique is appropriate) Thank you!
  11. Hello fellow artists! Here's my latest: I hope you enjoy, and if so, don't forget to share, like, and subscribe! Thank you all.
  12. Hello, fellow singers! Here is my next cover: If you like what you see, please share and like the video, and subscribe to my channel! Thank you all.I hope you enjoy!
  13. https://vocaroo.com/19hOp3YHxi9C here is my recording of Versace on the floor (chorus), and the bland mixed voice that I'm talking about starts from the lyrics "door, oooh I love that dress" till "anymore". I can transition seamlessly through my pasaggio but when I sing with it, I can't bring my chest voice even just a little starting from a#4 and above, example is the "Turn down the lights" is my chest voice and the close the "DOOR" sounds like my chest voice get left behind, I can't bring it up and dunno what can I do here. Any advice and also solutions to my particular problem. TYIA
  14. I've been listening to BTS "Dynamite" and looking at their Tiny Desk (Home) Concert. Most of the singers seem to hit the high B4 with ease, even though some have more vocal strain. On other songs, I'm able to hit a B4 without much vocal strain, but not in Dynamite. I find this particular sentence hard to sing and struggle with my vowels. I'm experiencing with different ways to approach the note, but I can't seem to get it right. Yes, there are some processing on the vocals in their performance, I already know that. I'm looking for some tips to help me hit the B4 with less straining. Here are all the timestamps refering to the sentence "Shining through the city with a little funk and soul": B4 => 0:55, 1:45, 2:02, 2:36 C#5 => 2:53, 3:09
  15. So, I am a rather young baritone/bass (depends who you ask) and I'm just trying to sound better singing my favorite songs. However, I don't really have the range to sing most of them, and I want to fix that lol. I feel like I have 3 modes that I can sing in, but 1 of them is unusable, and that happens to be the one in the range that I'm looking to use. I'll start with range, my comfy chest voice on a normal day is around D2 - D4 and I can occasionally get that pesky E4 on good days. My head voice on a good day can get up to F5 and can be taken down to around C4 ish. Now, the fun thing is I have a middle thing that sounds a lot like falsetto but weaker, and it covers from around F4-D5. Now, this middle thing would be incredibly useful if it was strong, but like I said it's lighter than a falsetto currently. I think this is some form of mixed voice that I'm just not putting the right finesse into. Does anyone have some exercises or tips that I could try to get that mode of my voice to sound more full so I could use it in songs? As it is currently, I have no clue how to train that, and neither does my vocal coach. Thanks in advance for any help. :)
  16. Hey guys, so I've come to bit of a dilemma recently. My private vocal coach whom I've seen for almost ten years now always suggested to breathe through the nose. When I studied clasiccal/opera in college I was told to breathe through the mouth. Went to my private voice teacher with this topic and he said that mouth-breath is an old pedagogical school of thought, and breathe through nose is the proper way. What I was told by college professor: Breathe through mouth because it raises the soft palate and you can prepare your mouth/throat for the onset of the coming phrase. What I was told by my private vocal coach: Breathe through nose because through the mouth dehydrates the vocal cords at a faster rate and you with proper technique you'll have the raised soft-palate/prepared throat without needing to open my mouth. Conflicting articles: Nose: https://www.ceenta.com/news-blog/sing-strongly-with-nasal-breathing Mouth: https://www.oxfordsinginglessons.co.uk/breathing-for-singers-is-different-from-normal-breathing/ Which is the proper way? I admit I do feel the mouth breath sets my vocal mechanism up for the onset of the coming note a little better than nose-breath but mouth breathing does dry out the chords and when I have a four hour gig I can't really afford to do that.
  17. Hello, fellow singers! My next cover is here: If you like it, please share the video and subscribe to my channel! Thank you all.I hope you enjoy!
  18. The last part of our tribute, we´ve choosen the epic Rainbow in the Dark, second single Dio released on his solo band, in 1983. Enjoy!!! Long Live Rock n Roll \m/
  19. Very fun song that has alternating characters, from the musical Jekyll and Hyde: Alternating head voice and chest voice with more compression to get the different vibes. Cheers!
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