Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'classical'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WELCOME & HOW TO GET STARTED!
    • Welcome New Members!
  • SINGING & TRAINING TECHNIQUES
    • General Discussions
  • REVIEW MY SINGING
    • Review My Singing
  • VOCAL GEAR
    • Microphones
    • Recording For Singers
    • Vocal Effects / Processing
  • SEEKING VOCALIST / VOCALIST AVAILABLE
    • Seeking Vocalist / Vocalist Available
  • ARTICLES / GEAR REVIEWS / INTERVIEWS
    • Vocal Gear Reviews
    • Singing Articles
    • Expert Interviews

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Singing Reviews, Programs & Lessons
  • Microphones (Live & Recording)
  • Vocal Pedals (Effects)
  • Home Recording Gear
  • Services For Singers
  • Singing Applications
  • Vocal Health Products
  • TMV World Exclusive Interviews

Categories

  • Product Reviews
  • Articles
  • Interviews

Product Groups

  • UNLIMITED SINGING REVIEWS
  • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
  • SINGERS TEA & INHALER

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Web Site URL

Found 33 results

  1. I thought this video was fascinating! Just had to share it! k
  2. I find it funny how I might be working on a piece with my teacher, and struggling with a part that only goes up to D4, and then I switch genres and I'm happily hitting G4 without difficulty. I almost want to classify things as 'rock high' vs. 'classical high' or 'Broadway high'. I had a piece of music that was killing me that centered around C#4 and D4 that kept going back into my throat, and I had to stop after a few minutes. But then I'm singing Karn Evil 9 by ELP, which is basically 100 G#4's and A4's in a row...and it's not a problem. Does anyone else find this to be the case? What is it about certain things that make them harder than others?
  3. As I've mentioned in other posts, I've been taking lessons for a few months with an opera/musical theater singer, and I've played a whole lot of different singers I enjoy for her to hear her opinion, and I find it interesting to hear the impressions of someone from a different world and different sensibilities. I thought I'd compile all the ones I remember into a collection because I was also curious to hear reactions: Chris Cornell: Disliked. "He's just screaming in the one part. And his high notes are very thin, but he puts all the scream and effect on it. If you heard it without that stuff it would just be a very weak sound." Bruce Dickinson(Iron Maiden): Disliked. "Sound is thin, poor technique on higher notes, badly produced vibrato." Dio: Unimpressed. "Again, just a thin tenor putting some effect on his voice." Warrel Dane(Nevermore): Liked. "Good control. He's making a choice on every note." Eric Adams(Manowar): "One of the best sounds of all the singers you've played for me. But still a thinner tenor voice." Mike Patton: Liked. "Nice voice, clearly knows how to sing. But I wish I could hear his natural sound more instead of all this 'put on' stuff he does." Tarja Turunen and Marco Hietala(Nightwish): "You can hear both these people know how to sing correctly, they're just doing some weird things because that's the style I guess. Forcing the straight tones is making her sound flat, and she knows that, but she still does it." Devin Townsend: "If I were his ENT doctor, I'd love him, because of all the money I'd make form all the damage he's doing. He has to be on steroids to be doing what he does consistently. Either that or he's just a freak." Eric Clayton (Savior Machine): "Completely different from the other stuff you've shown me. Sounds like a regular baritone stage voice." Daniel Heiman (Lost Horizon): "Not bad. He's doing some of that weird stuff again, but he sounds good otherwise." Alissa White-Gluz (Arch Enemy): "Oh God, that's a woman!? I can't listen, it's too painful, she's ripping her vocal chords to shreds." Phil Anselmo (Pantera): "I guess it's...kind of like singing." Tim "Ripper" Owens (Judas Priest, Iced earth): "His voice will probably last a bit longer because he knows what he's doing and being very controlled about it." Mikael Akerfeldt (Opeth): "He's got a nice voice." Mikael Akerfeldt growling: "There's no way he's producing that sound naturally. Either that or he's doing it very quietly and it's made to sound much bigger."
  4. Hello singers! Please give me your honest opinion and take your time for constructive criticism if needed. I did my best and have just recently switched over to softer music! Here it is, its a little about 1 minute
  5. Currently debating my existence listening to the melismas in Handel's 'See the raging flames arise.' Any tips on melismas in general?
  6. Hi Guys, I would like to welcome you to my new website where I offer accompanying services- I provide already pre-recorded tracks as well as customised ones. Don't hesitate and get in touch. https://www.pianoaccompanimentforyou.com/
  7. Dear all, It has been a while that I have visited this forum. I have been very busy with my studies—having completed my BA in Musicology and currently finalising my MA in Applied Musicology. I did keep on working on my singing, however. Yesterday, “The Music of the Night,” a song that I auditioned with at the Conservatory of Rotterdam over a decade ago and that I had used for my singing lessons with many different teachers, was one I had never actually performed—until now! Indeed, there appears to be balancing issues with volume between me and the piano. On the other hand, I asked several attendees whether they felt there were problems with it, but they all did not notice them live. While I do think we could work on balancing our instruments, I believe the recording is augmenting the issue quite a bit. I am really satisfied with the performance—especially my acting abilities, intonation, enunciation, and stage presence. I could be more confident with the fermata notes just doing them as long as I want, rather than thinking I might do them too long (I think the “soul”-note [2:32] is great, the “be”-note [3:44] is just about right, the ”night”-note [5:20] is executed pretty well, but could easily be five seconds longer). I could also definitely stabilise and pronounce my “ring” more. Manolito Mystiq
  8. I have tried searching the internet and forum for clear answers to my questions, but can't seem to find anything coherent. Here are my questions: 1. Does mixed voice (speech level singing mixed voice) belong in classical singing (please specify male and female)? 2. What are the differences between classical technique (male and female), and mixed voice? 3. How can mixed voice be applied to classical singing/teaching? They may seem like generic questions, but look it up yourself, nothing on the web is clear. These need clear concise answers for the world to understand! Thank you for your contributions.
  9. In the world of opera, male singers have much more deep, dark tones to their singing than rock singers do. Even a tenor in dramatic opera might sound like a 'deeper' voice than 90% of all rock singers. For example, this is a low tenor role, but a tenor role nonetheless (singing stars at 0:58) : My questions is, is this more because rock singers mostly consist of thinner, smaller voices, or does the rock style involve deliberately 'thinning' your sound, or at the very least not going for those deep tones classical singers do? I ask because it seems like the vast majority of rock repertoire are 'not my voice', and not even because I'm a bass or bass-baritone, but just a bigger baritone or baritenor by opera standards.
  10. Please leave a comment below if u are interested in getting ur track mastered for only $5!
  11. Do you have music on Spotify, iTunes, etc? If you do not, we offer services to post your single, albums, or EPs on up to 14 major music platforms cheap! If you have music on Spotify, we can jumpstart you with tremendous amounts of plays for very cheap prices. If you earn royalties on your music, you can actually make money off of these 100% organic plays. Lemme know what you think! 1,000 Plays - $10 ($4) 5,000 Plays- $40 ($20) 10,000 Plays- $75 ($40) 50,000 Plays- $350 ($200) 100,000 Plays- $500 ($400) 200,000 Plays- $750 ($800) 500,000 Plays- $1500 ($2000) 1,000,000 Plays- $2500 ($4000) 2,000,000 Plays- $4750($ 8000) those are our prices, the prices in the parentheses is how much you would make off of the plays if you made .004 cents per play. (.004 cents per day is the lowest amount of royalties given by spotify.
  12. ROBERT LUNTE AXIOM FOR THE DAY: I sang this beautiful classic love song by Handel at the University of Miami "back in the day". Although I doubt as nicely as Richard Lewis does on this performance. While enjoying Richard's rendition, it suddenly dawned on me the following... Take the most beautiful man and compare him to the most beautiful woman in a beauty contest, and no gent has ever had a chance. In spite of our merits guys, we just are not as "inspiring" for eyes to gaze upon in regards to physical attraction. And that is ok, that is the way nature has set it up. But to my point... "Humankind" doesn't write songs like this about men... only women get songs like THIS. Oh sure, there is the occasional Pat Benatar, "Fire & Ice" or Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man", we do get a few bones tossed our way fellas, but let's be honest, we never get songs like "Faithfully" by Journey, or "When I Was Your Man" by Bruno Mars, or song like "Where'er You Walk" that has been playing for hundreds of years. Guys get, "You Broke My Heart" songs... but women truly get LOVE songs of such great adoration from us smitten clunky fumbling males. In Summary, the power of female attributes, which certainly would include aesthetic beauty, arguably has inspired a greater inspiration to write the greatest love songs through the ages. Thus, nature, or evolutionary biology of the sexes, influences observable and apparently evident differences art of love song composition. I just find that to be an interesting observation. This song by Handel is what?... 400 years old? Chances are, prior to it being published at the time, it likely existed in an earlier version as a folk song that people ( or guys...), sang around the camp fire, or to try to serenade a woman. Guys, Listen to this song and follow the lyrics and tell me that you have never felt this way about a woman? BTW... ladies in case it isn't obvious, this is a compliment to you and yours.
  13. WOMEN VS. MEN WHY MEN DON'T HAVE A CHANCE WITH LOVE SONGS! I sang this beautiful classic love song by Handel at the University of Miami "back in the day". Although I doubt as nicely as Richard Lewis does on this performance. While enjoying Richard's rendition, it suddenly dawned on me the following... Take the most beautiful man and compare him to the most beautiful woman in a beauty contest, and no gent has ever had a chance. In spite of our merits guys, we just are not as "inspiring" for eyes to gaze upon in regards to physical attraction. And that is ok, that is the way nature has set it up. But to my point... "Humankind" doesn't write songs like this about men... only women get songs like THIS. Oh sure, there is the occasional Pat Benatar, "Fire & Ice" or Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man", we do get a few bones tossed our way fellas, but let's be honest, we never get songs like "Faithfully" by Journey, or "When I Was Your Man" by Bruno Mars, or song like "Where'er You Walk" that has been playing for hundreds of years. Guys get, "You Broke My Heart" songs... but women truly get LOVE songs of such great adoration from us smitten clunky fumbling males. In Summary, the power of female attributes, which certainly would include aesthetic beauty, arguably has inspired a greater inspiration to write the greatest love songs through the ages. Thus, nature, or evolutionary biology of the sexes, influences observable and apparently evident differences art of love song composition. I just find that to be an interesting observation. This song by Handel is what?... 400 years old? Chances are, prior to it being published at the time, it likely existed in an earlier version as a folk song that people ( or guys...), sang around the camp fire, or to try to serenade a woman. Guys, Listen to this song and follow the lyrics and tell me that you have never felt this way about a woman? BTW... ladies in case it isn't obvious, this is a compliment to you and yours. View full articles
  14. Robert Lunte

    Why Women Get Better Love Songs Than Men!

    WOMEN VS. MEN WHY MEN DON'T HAVE A CHANCE WITH LOVE SONGS! I sang this beautiful classic love song by Handel at the University of Miami "back in the day". Although I doubt as nicely as Richard Lewis does on this performance. While enjoying Richard's rendition, it suddenly dawned on me the following... Take the most beautiful man and compare him to the most beautiful woman in a beauty contest, and no gent has ever had a chance. In spite of our merits guys, we just are not as "inspiring" for eyes to gaze upon in regards to physical attraction. And that is ok, that is the way nature has set it up. But to my point... "Humankind" doesn't write songs like this about men... only women get songs like THIS. Oh sure, there is the occasional Pat Benatar, "Fire & Ice" or Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man", we do get a few bones tossed our way fellas, but let's be honest, we never get songs like "Faithfully" by Journey, or "When I Was Your Man" by Bruno Mars, or song like "Where'er You Walk" that has been playing for hundreds of years. Guys get, "You Broke My Heart" songs... but women truly get LOVE songs of such great adoration from us smitten clunky fumbling males. In Summary, the power of female attributes, which certainly would include aesthetic beauty, arguably has inspired a greater inspiration to write the greatest love songs through the ages. Thus, nature, or evolutionary biology of the sexes, influences observable and apparently evident differences art of love song composition. I just find that to be an interesting observation. This song by Handel is what?... 400 years old? Chances are, prior to it being published at the time, it likely existed in an earlier version as a folk song that people ( or guys...), sang around the camp fire, or to try to serenade a woman. Guys, Listen to this song and follow the lyrics and tell me that you have never felt this way about a woman? BTW... ladies in case it isn't obvious, this is a compliment to you and yours.
  15. Hello ! I am a 18 years old piano player. I've been playing the piano for more than eight years and that's something I really enjoy despite my many injuries, thanks to it. But nevertheless, I won't stop. I also have another hobby : I really enjoy singing. It feels so comfortable and it pleases me a lot. Singing has alwyas been different, even if I can't sing "properly" (according to singing technique standards), I'm still to enjoy it and I do. I've always noticed that unlike the piano, I'm able to feel what I sing (I'm French but speak English obviously and understand the meaning of every shing I sing) and how to say that... get into the song, let it flow throw me. I sound horrible but yet, I know I've given my all ahahah. That's something I've never achieved with the piano... Feeling the song. That's sad but I guess it'll come some day. I'll never be a star and I don't want to. I want to learn singing for myself (even if I must admit... that'd be great not to sound like a duck whenever I sing with friends, for fun) because as far as my music side tells me, I've gathered two problems : A very nasal voice (I guess it's because of a poor (inexistant) breathing training something I know is very important to singing) and I just don't know when my singing is right. I never know if it's too high, too low but I guess this problem doesn't carry on with training. I've come here to ask you guys if you had stuff for me so I can learn how to sing... correctly ? I mean... being able to sing without a nasal voice and to sing in tune (hitting the right notes) ; After that, maybe I could go further but let us not get lost. I like to enjoy myself even more! I've got a piano available 24/7 so if you've got things that involves having one. I do. I've got a little music ear. I can recognise notes but I can't play by ear for example. Anyway, I hope you'll find something for someone as beginner as me ^^ Thanks a lot
  16. Hey there we require an experienced vocalist male or femal for our active acoustic band. We are hard to describe but things like Gypsy, classical, alternative, Neo folk have been used. We gig regularly and are keen to play as much as possible and get into the festivals here and overseas. We are Double bass/ violin/ classical guitar/ djembe. We have had a few vocalist but other projects have gotten in the way and we are looking for someone who is reliable, versatile, and enjoys playing shows. We are very original and engaging. Make contact with some info about yourself or links and we will hook you up with some of our music. Thanks.
  17. Hi, I am a sixteen year-old classical singer aspiring to study opera. I have a "serious" (I don't really know what qualifies as serious) vibrato problem, and I would really appreciate any advice! I have a wonderful teacher, a former professional opera singer, but she is a bit too nice and hesitates to criticize me, even when I can hear my vibrato issue clearly in recordings of my singing. I'll tell you about my voice, if that info would be helpful. I'm a soprano, range Eb3 to G#6. My voice is extremely loud and very resonant (though sometimes the resonance is a bit nasal in my low range). If I had a fach, it would most likely be lyric, as the quality is very bright, but also has a thick and almost heavy (but not certainly dark) quality to it. I have pretty good coloratura abilities, but nothing very special. When I was younger, my voice was very breathy and mostly straight-toned, with a fluttery vibrato at the end of each note. When I developed a consistent vibrato, however, it ended up being very slow. It is usually quite (but not horribly) wide as well. I've been told that it will get better as my voice develops and I get older, as I'm only sixteen, but I'm worried this will prevent me from getting training opportunities now and getting into a college vocal program. Also, please tell me if it's true that this will get better!! Here are some things about my vibrato that may help you identify the issue: It is much better in fast songs than slow songs. It improves if I take a slow song at a faster tempo. It is the slowest in the bottom of my head voice (F4-B4) and the particular notes D5, G5, and B5. It's pretty funny, really. E5, A5, and C6 spin much faster. I am an athlete and have very good abdominal muscle tone. I am not at all heavy (I run track) but I do have a pretty curvy figure. That's not important, I think, but TBH I'll include anything I think might help with the advice! I usually can't tell when my vibrato is slow until I listen to it later. I can sing very long phrases and generally have good breath control I have a GI disorder which sometimes gives me severe abdominal bloating. If I try to sing with this bloating, the vibrato is slower than ever. Hopefully I will find a medication or diet that works. Please please please any advice! I love singing, and other than my vibrato, my voice has good assets. I'd so appreciate anything. Thank you
  18. In the Spanish wikipedia article for Falsete (I'm learning it by heart ) I've read this: The first sentence says: In the Bel Canto (opera) technique, Head Voice and Chest Voice are mixed and that way Passagio is camouflaged. Since my main interest is in improving some voice similar to this, I should have a clear idea about it but I don't right now... I'll keep thinking and investigating, and will be very much interested in reading what you think about it.
  19. http://www.kxii.com/news/paris/headlines/Opera-singer-visits-former-high-school--329317201.html Cool article and vid about an opera singer who was originally from Paris, Texas and returned their to visit. Paris is north and east of Dallas, close to the border if southeast Oklahoma.
  20. Robert Lunte

    Bel Canto - The Secret Exposed

    Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/. Visit the world's highest rated vocal training program! One of the problems with “Bel Canto” is that it is a term that a lot of voice teachers use because it sounds interesting. “Bel Canto” sounds serious or, as if it is the ultimate in singing techniques or possesses the secrets of singing from a time long forgotten! Unfortunately, “Bel Canto” has become a “buzz” word that people use to impress students, simply stated. “Bel Canto” just means beautiful singing? It essentially is referring to a style of singing that has a lot of legato in it, that came from a specific region of Italy in the 18th century. Thats it, there is nothing magical about “Bel Canto”, unless you are led to believe that it is something more then what you could get with any other good teacher. Don’t believe me? Here is wikipedia’s definition. Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. So this simple less is, do not be fooled that “Bel Canto” means something “high brow” or a set of techniques that come from the ancient past when people were more wise and magical. The truth is, there has never been a time in the history of voice training where there has been more innovation, understanding and great techniques to help singers then the present. I would much rather be training my voice in the present era, then in the ancient past. For sure! Bel Canto is not a rare, ancient method of singing that supersedes anything that The Four Pillars of Singing is not already offering, or any other great vocal training program. Be careful not to get bamboozled by the “Bel Canto” buzz word hype. https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/ View full article
  21. TMV World Team

    Bel Canto - The Secret Exposed

    Singing Secrets From The Ancient Past Are DEAD! https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/. Visit the world's highest rated vocal training program! One of the problems with “Bel Canto” is that it is a term that a lot of voice teachers use because it sounds interesting. “Bel Canto” sounds serious or, as if it is the ultimate in singing techniques or possesses the secrets of singing from a time long forgotten! Unfortunately, “Bel Canto” has become a “buzz” word that people use to impress students, simply stated. “Bel Canto” just means beautiful singing? It essentially is referring to a style of singing that has a lot of legato in it, that came from a specific region of Italy in the 18th century. Thats it, there is nothing magical about “Bel Canto”, unless you are led to believe that it is something more then what you could get with any other good teacher. Don’t believe me? Here is wikipedia’s definition. Wikipedia States: Bel canto (bel-canto) (Italian, “beautiful singing” or “beautiful song”), along with a number of similar constructions (“bellezze del canto”/”bell’arte del canto”), is a term relating to Italian singing. It has several different meanings and is subject to a wide variety of interpretations. “Bel Canto” and is unfortunately used as a marketing “buzz” word too often and in many regards, there is nothing particularly unique about it. I can call many of the things I teach at The Vocalist Studio, “Bel Canto” and so can many other good teachers. Any good teacher that teaches legato and appoggio and beautiful resonance can call themselves “Bel Canto” or could claim that they are teaching “Bel Canto”. So this simple less is, do not be fooled that “Bel Canto” means something “high brow” or a set of techniques that come from the ancient past when people were more wise and magical. The truth is, there has never been a time in the history of voice training where there has been more innovation, understanding and great techniques to help singers then the present. I would much rather be training my voice in the present era, then in the ancient past. For sure! Bel Canto is not a rare, ancient method of singing that supersedes anything that The Four Pillars of Singing is not already offering, or any other great vocal training program. Be careful not to get bamboozled by the “Bel Canto” buzz word hype. https://www.thefourpillarsofsinging.com/reviews/
  22. Hi! For the ones that are new to my name, I am Francis. 15 years of age. i like singing classical, rnb and opera. Maybe some rock too. It's been a long time since I last posted and I was like a newbie way back then. And I am coming back with a song of G. Puccini popularized by Luciano Pavarotti. This is Nessun Dorma. http://picosong.com/Sbbw I had a break somewhere at "Il nome mio nessun sapra" and I really want to ask about that. First, about what the title says. What resonation am I using? Is it chest, head, or mixing? WARNING: The very first part of the clip where I was speaking is very soft. The singing part is VERY loud. So, I recommend turning down the volume for the part after "Here it goes". And, is this proper or not? Do I need to address something first before continuing and finishing the song? All replies will be appreciated. Thanks in advance! -Slash
  23. This Guy Trained Onsets & Vowels He's Good...