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  1. Hi. Easy arias/lieder with a strong repetive melody and short lyrics.I will soon apply to Opera Undergraduate educations around Europe.I am in a hurry. I am a soprano. 24 years old. I have b12 deficiency so a little problem with memory.I live in Sweden and wonder if you know arias and lieder that are easy to remember with a easy melody and short lyrics.Maybe something like this (repetetive) https://youtu.be/-7qYeZcOioI but arias/lieder and for a soprano soloist.Thank you in advance!Hedda Nilsson
  2. I'm a rather young Bass singer: only in my early teens, and I'm trying to improve my tone. I've been told by my teacher I have a very dark tone, so I've been working on brightening it for the past month or so. However, now that my tone has brightened significantly, I noticed that my voice sounds much less mature than other Basses that I've listened to. Now I'm confused about what gives a Bass, especially a classical soloist, that "Bass" sound other than the brightness/darkness of their voice or if I simply made my tone too bright.
  3. www.vocalizing.com By Karen Oleson and Timothy Strong The genesis for this article comes from a workshop I was asked to present for a local chapter of NATS (National Assoc. of Teachers of Singing). It is only in very recent history, that performance studies in vocal jazz have been offered in academic settings. Prior to this if one wished to be a jazz singer they learned by listening to, following and copying other singers and experimenting and performing at every opportunity. Now that jazz styles have been codified it is easier for modern educators to expose jazz singing to students at almost any age. It can be confusing for both student and teacher to try to translate the voice building techniques and exercises needed to produce desired results for both classical and jazz singing. The vocal choices one makes for singing jazz are quite different from a classical singer. My students love singing jazz and are thrilled when they are accepted into their jazz choir or ensemble but are challenged to bridge the differences between techniques. So what are these differences? Can we bridge these diverse techniques? Can they be compatible? Have we been allowing style differences to interrupt the goal of voice building? The following chart suggests some of the presumed differences in vocal technique and style. Classical Technique Voice Quality: Resonant, full bodied, clear. Breath Management: Fundamental building block for voice development. Opera singers need to sing for hours over symphony orchestra with no mic(rophone). Articulation: Pure vowels, clipped consonants, years of study in at least four languages Range: Wide range, 2 1/2 to three octaves, top notes of prime importance no matter what voice type. Flexibility: Desirable for keeping voice fresh and healthy. Necessary to negotiate challenging cadenzas. Registers: Blended, seamless connection between registers Posture: Very important consideration for breath management and voice projection. Dynamics: Requires large dynamic range from pp to ff. Messa di voce important study for voice building. Vibrato: Used extensively, integral part of the vocal quality. Jazz Technique Voice Quality: Can be earthy or breathy. Close to speaking voice. Breath Management: Singers also required to sustain long phrases and scat. But since the sound doesn’t need to as resonant, or as powerful, learning nuances of mic technique becomes essential. Articulation: Very close to speaking voice. Diphthongs are used according to singers’ choice. Range: Ranges of more than an octave unnecessary but often desired. Vocal improv takes the singer to the extremes of the voice both low and high. Flexibility: Desirable for improvisation. Registers: Breaks in voice often dramatically emphasized. Posture: Appearance often cool, dispassionate Dynamics: Fewer vocal extremes required. Vibrato: Often used minimally and at end of phrases. Classical Style Pitch: Often taught to come in on top of pitch, but to sing in middle of pitch. Rhythm: Precision is important. Runs done as meteronomically accurate as possible. Rubato done at specific places in music and according to era of music and composer. Attack: The onset of the pitch is executed gently. Letting the breath lead. The pitch needs to be precisely in tune. Musical Accuracy: Do not deviate from composers apparent intent. Sing rhythm and pitches according to what is written in the score. Improvisation: Improvisation is dictated according to current trends. Improv is allowed only in certain styles and periods of music Other features: Acting and presentation skills are important in classical singing. The quality of the sound, communicating the text and music are prime considerations. Jazz Style Pitch: Sing on lower part of pitch. Enter or scoop from under pitch. Rhythm: Fluidity within the meter is allowed and desired. Sing against or after the beat. The pause is strictly kept by the drummer so that the rest of the group can play with the rhythm. Attack: Sometimes hard onset in used, other times soft. Enter from below pitch, strong blues influence. Musical Accuracy: The whole point of singing jazz is to be a co-creator with the composer in that particular moment in time. Next time it will be different (hopefully). Improvisation: Scat syllables and improvisations are influenced by current trends. Improv is the name of the game. Other features: Presentation is secondary to listening and responding to other participants while performing. Everything is new, so that cultivating awareness of what's going on around you is of primary importance. Being in the musical moment. The chart shows how singers make choices about how they use their voices depending on the style of music. So how does this affect their training? How do we bridge these diverse techniques and can they be compatible in voice building? Most music educators will agree that we want our students to sing well, no matter what the style. Breath management is an essential part of voice building and good singing. However, because classical singers sing without a mic and have to maintain a fuller resonance they are unable to play with the subtle vocal nuances that the jazz singers enjoy. The microphone assists the jazz singer in singing with a breathy tone, growling, and singing very lightly if they wish. Still, all of those choices need breath management. Articulation is an important ingredient for both types of singing. The jazz singer can be more speech-like and casual in their approach. Ex. My = ma-i. They can play with diphthongs according to their will. Classical singers are more formal in their use of language most often stay longer on the first half vowel of a diphthong. Ex. My=mah-i. It might seem that clarity of text and understandability should have priority but both classical and jazz singers may sacrifice this for a certain type of vocal sound. Classical singers spend years learning to blend the natural occurring register breaks in the voice. Although somewhat important in the jazz singer, it is minimal. The mic can assist the jazz singer with this so that they are able to play with subtle qualities and ranges that wouldn't be heard if a classical singer tried it. Today when students enter my private studio, I ask them about their musical goals. As they are exposed to voice building techniques their goals may change but the important thing for us is to help them find their way efficiently. I've experienced having younger students wanting to be country singers develop into prize winning classical singers. I've also encountered classical trained singers who were relieved to find that there are other techniques that would help them sing musical theatre or jazz. If they are interested in both aspects of singing, the lesson time needs to be subtly managed to address different musical goals. They will need to educate their ear about pitch, vibrato, and the volume of sound and resonance of the voice. A classical singer needs to hear their voice in a natural acoustical environment without artificial support. Jazz singers needs to become accustomed to hearing themselves through amplification. As pointed out in the chart, the use of vibrato, dynamics, pitch onset, voice coloring, rhythm, and many other aspects of these two diverse styles are for the most part at odds with one another. When these considerations are pointed out to the students, they have a better chance of making appropriate choices without confusion and with an appreciation of the differences. Our studio has developed publications that present voice building exercises encompassing various musical styles.* In the example presented below, the purpose of the exercise is rich and deep: ear training, pitch accuracy, flexibility, and singing in contrasting styles. In my opinion, you get the best of both worlds here - a classical warm-up, learning to sing in a major and then a minor key (great ear training), and then scat improv in both major and minor keys. With this exercise, you have an opportunity to show off your classical voice and quickly switch to jazz. These contrasting styles require different ways of using your voice. The classical style requires a more fully resonant sound including vibrato, whereas in jazz vocals, a more speech like quality is appreciated. In conclusion, clear and meaningful communication as to the differences in vocal usage and styles can make all the difference in your students’ abilities to enjoy and perform different styles of music. I have found that presenting them with practical models for bridging the gap can do wonders for their understanding and enjoyment of music making.
  4. Hello all! I am a Toronto-based actor, singer, and musical theatre performer. I've performed in various musicals all across Ontario, Canada, such as Jekyll & Hyde, West Side Story, Beauty and the Beast, Sweeney Todd, Evita, and Mamma Mia in leading roles. Also, I've another coming up in March 2020: Phoebus in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.The other day, I launched my first YouTube channel (a task long overdue), on which I'll be posting covers of songs that are personal favorites, as well as clips and highlights from my live performances. To begin with, here's my cover of the Scorpions' "Still Loving You":www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOwFsg6Qzu0I'd love to know your thoughts, and, if you enjoy the video, please feel free to share it and subscribe to my channel, as there'll be plenty more where that came from. Thank you!
  5. I am looking for suggestions to work on passaggio improvement and techniques in vocal lessons.
  6. What caught my attention here was the statement that modern day tenors tend to emphasize the SIXTH as the dominant harmonic. I recall an argument in which someone was trying to convince me that asymmetric vocal fold closure (due to high closed quotient) was critical for full projection, and that that is why the THIRD and FIFTH harmonic are dominant. Well, that is not consistent with what we have here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzGITC_PRWw (I am aware that Livigni has done a video on the "importance of" the closed quotient, but I still think that the science behind it is shaky.)
  7. Here is a topic I have always thought was interesting. Would love to hear people's input on this. Maybe @Pcastagner might have some interesting things to share here. Thoughts Phillip?...
  8. [Twitter] [Youtube] [Soundcloud] [Memberlist] Please visit memberlist for individual vocal samples, composer and producer samples, as well as art samples! I am currently looking for male vocalists and potentially one female, for a long term, dedicated music circle and collaboration group We operate on an opt in or out basis, as long as you stay up to date with what's going on. We would like people that are able to write their own lyrics, or contribute vocal melody and harmonies, or can double as a staff position (audio, video, art, composition.) To audition please send a sample of a ballad or classical song as well as a pop, rock, or r&b song, tell us a bit about yourself, why you want to join, and gear you use to record audio/video. If you have anything else to offer the group in terms of positions, please let us know. We are also looking for staff, such as composers/producers who work with any of the following: classical, orchestral, edm, pop, symphonic metal/rock, artcore, new age, r&b. Must be willing to collab with other composers/producers on occasion. Currently also seeking mixers, tuner/timers, video editors, and artists as well. Please send auditions to our Twitter or Danielle#5039 on Discord! Here is a bit about us: Quintessence is an upcoming music circle, and music group. We will mainly create original songs and content, however we will occasionally do covers. Quintessence will release music that can focus one, multiple, or all of our vocalists. We strive to create music that is deeper that people can relate to, but also that takes us to another world, and revolves around fantasy. Genres we will focus on include pop, folk, classical, orchestral, ambient, new age, r&b, and experimental. We will also do a lot of crossovers within genres. We take inspiration from Wave, Akiko Shikata, Kokia, Kaoling, Sam Smith, Ed Sheeran, Jojo, Epica, and more. We are seeking people that are creative, genuine, like to experiment, and don’t like to limit themselves. Members of Quintessence are expected to commit and be active, this is a permanent group, and you will be expected to meet tight deadlines, and take an active part in insuring our success. Inability to communicate and meet deadlines, will result in potential kick from the group. All members are expected to take part in the creative process as well, and grow as individuals. It will be mandatory for vocalists to adapt themselves and learn how to sing within various genres. For vocalists, they will need to be comfortable being on camera, majority of our videos and pictures will feature the vocalists, and other staff, themselves. Those chosen will be temporarily in a trial position, to see if they work well with the current members. Values: Kindness, humility, camaraderie, compassion, authenticity, creativity, knowledge, fortitude, introspection, free thinking, bravery. Member Musts Respectful and helpful to other members. Acts professional but can also be casual, also approachable and genuine, we want everyone to be able to be themselves. Upholds a positive attitude and image for both themselves and the group, not just with us, but around others, and all social medias. Has a can do attitude, and is always willing to jump in and help. Is able to take constructive criticism and is introspective. Is able to work with other’s creative ideas, but can also contribute their own. Is a team player. Is willing to learn and improve, doesn’t believe they know all the answers.
  9. What are some techniques that will help a student learn how to use good breath support?
  10. I find it funny how I might be working on a piece with my teacher, and struggling with a part that only goes up to D4, and then I switch genres and I'm happily hitting G4 without difficulty. I almost want to classify things as 'rock high' vs. 'classical high' or 'Broadway high'. I had a piece of music that was killing me that centered around C#4 and D4 that kept going back into my throat, and I had to stop after a few minutes. But then I'm singing Karn Evil 9 by ELP, which is basically 100 G#4's and A4's in a row...and it's not a problem. Does anyone else find this to be the case? What is it about certain things that make them harder than others?
  11. As I've mentioned in other posts, I've been taking lessons for a few months with an opera/musical theater singer, and I've played a whole lot of different singers I enjoy for her to hear her opinion, and I find it interesting to hear the impressions of someone from a different world and different sensibilities. I thought I'd compile all the ones I remember into a collection because I was also curious to hear reactions: Chris Cornell: Disliked. "He's just screaming in the one part. And his high notes are very thin, but he puts all the scream and effect on it. If you heard it without that stuff it would just be a very weak sound." Bruce Dickinson(Iron Maiden): Disliked. "Sound is thin, poor technique on higher notes, badly produced vibrato." Dio: Unimpressed. "Again, just a thin tenor putting some effect on his voice." Warrel Dane(Nevermore): Liked. "Good control. He's making a choice on every note." Eric Adams(Manowar): "One of the best sounds of all the singers you've played for me. But still a thinner tenor voice." Mike Patton: Liked. "Nice voice, clearly knows how to sing. But I wish I could hear his natural sound more instead of all this 'put on' stuff he does." Tarja Turunen and Marco Hietala(Nightwish): "You can hear both these people know how to sing correctly, they're just doing some weird things because that's the style I guess. Forcing the straight tones is making her sound flat, and she knows that, but she still does it." Devin Townsend: "If I were his ENT doctor, I'd love him, because of all the money I'd make form all the damage he's doing. He has to be on steroids to be doing what he does consistently. Either that or he's just a freak." Eric Clayton (Savior Machine): "Completely different from the other stuff you've shown me. Sounds like a regular baritone stage voice." Daniel Heiman (Lost Horizon): "Not bad. He's doing some of that weird stuff again, but he sounds good otherwise." Alissa White-Gluz (Arch Enemy): "Oh God, that's a woman!? I can't listen, it's too painful, she's ripping her vocal chords to shreds." Phil Anselmo (Pantera): "I guess it's...kind of like singing." Tim "Ripper" Owens (Judas Priest, Iced earth): "His voice will probably last a bit longer because he knows what he's doing and being very controlled about it." Mikael Akerfeldt (Opeth): "He's got a nice voice." Mikael Akerfeldt growling: "There's no way he's producing that sound naturally. Either that or he's doing it very quietly and it's made to sound much bigger."
  12. Hello singers! Please give me your honest opinion and take your time for constructive criticism if needed. I did my best and have just recently switched over to softer music! Here it is, its a little about 1 minute
  13. Currently debating my existence listening to the melismas in Handel's 'See the raging flames arise.' Any tips on melismas in general?
  14. Dear all, It has been a while that I have visited this forum. I have been very busy with my studies—having completed my BA in Musicology and currently finalising my MA in Applied Musicology. I did keep on working on my singing, however. Yesterday, “The Music of the Night,” a song that I auditioned with at the Conservatory of Rotterdam over a decade ago and that I had used for my singing lessons with many different teachers, was one I had never actually performed—until now! Indeed, there appears to be balancing issues with volume between me and the piano. On the other hand, I asked several attendees whether they felt there were problems with it, but they all did not notice them live. While I do think we could work on balancing our instruments, I believe the recording is augmenting the issue quite a bit. I am really satisfied with the performance—especially my acting abilities, intonation, enunciation, and stage presence. I could be more confident with the fermata notes just doing them as long as I want, rather than thinking I might do them too long (I think the “soul”-note [2:32] is great, the “be”-note [3:44] is just about right, the ”night”-note [5:20] is executed pretty well, but could easily be five seconds longer). I could also definitely stabilise and pronounce my “ring” more. Manolito Mystiq
  15. I have tried searching the internet and forum for clear answers to my questions, but can't seem to find anything coherent. Here are my questions: 1. Does mixed voice (speech level singing mixed voice) belong in classical singing (please specify male and female)? 2. What are the differences between classical technique (male and female), and mixed voice? 3. How can mixed voice be applied to classical singing/teaching? They may seem like generic questions, but look it up yourself, nothing on the web is clear. These need clear concise answers for the world to understand! Thank you for your contributions.
  16. In the world of opera, male singers have much more deep, dark tones to their singing than rock singers do. Even a tenor in dramatic opera might sound like a 'deeper' voice than 90% of all rock singers. For example, this is a low tenor role, but a tenor role nonetheless (singing stars at 0:58) : My questions is, is this more because rock singers mostly consist of thinner, smaller voices, or does the rock style involve deliberately 'thinning' your sound, or at the very least not going for those deep tones classical singers do? I ask because it seems like the vast majority of rock repertoire are 'not my voice', and not even because I'm a bass or bass-baritone, but just a bigger baritone or baritenor by opera standards.
  17. Please leave a comment below if u are interested in getting ur track mastered for only $5!
  18. ROBERT LUNTE AXIOM FOR THE DAY: I sang this beautiful classic love song by Handel at the University of Miami "back in the day". Although I doubt as nicely as Richard Lewis does on this performance. While enjoying Richard's rendition, it suddenly dawned on me the following... Take the most beautiful man and compare him to the most beautiful woman in a beauty contest, and no gent has ever had a chance. In spite of our merits guys, we just are not as "inspiring" for eyes to gaze upon in regards to physical attraction. And that is ok, that is the way nature has set it up. But to my point... "Humankind" doesn't write songs like this about men... only women get songs like THIS. Oh sure, there is the occasional Pat Benatar, "Fire & Ice" or Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man", we do get a few bones tossed our way fellas, but let's be honest, we never get songs like "Faithfully" by Journey, or "When I Was Your Man" by Bruno Mars, or song like "Where'er You Walk" that has been playing for hundreds of years. Guys get, "You Broke My Heart" songs... but women truly get LOVE songs of such great adoration from us smitten clunky fumbling males. In Summary, the power of female attributes, which certainly would include aesthetic beauty, arguably has inspired a greater inspiration to write the greatest love songs through the ages. Thus, nature, or evolutionary biology of the sexes, influences observable and apparently evident differences art of love song composition. I just find that to be an interesting observation. This song by Handel is what?... 400 years old? Chances are, prior to it being published at the time, it likely existed in an earlier version as a folk song that people ( or guys...), sang around the camp fire, or to try to serenade a woman. Guys, Listen to this song and follow the lyrics and tell me that you have never felt this way about a woman? BTW... ladies in case it isn't obvious, this is a compliment to you and yours.
  19. WOMEN VS. MEN WHY MEN DON'T HAVE A CHANCE WITH LOVE SONGS! I sang this beautiful classic love song by Handel at the University of Miami "back in the day". Although I doubt as nicely as Richard Lewis does on this performance. While enjoying Richard's rendition, it suddenly dawned on me the following... Take the most beautiful man and compare him to the most beautiful woman in a beauty contest, and no gent has ever had a chance. In spite of our merits guys, we just are not as "inspiring" for eyes to gaze upon in regards to physical attraction. And that is ok, that is the way nature has set it up. But to my point... "Humankind" doesn't write songs like this about men... only women get songs like THIS. Oh sure, there is the occasional Pat Benatar, "Fire & Ice" or Tammy Wynette's "Stand By Your Man", we do get a few bones tossed our way fellas, but let's be honest, we never get songs like "Faithfully" by Journey, or "When I Was Your Man" by Bruno Mars, or song like "Where'er You Walk" that has been playing for hundreds of years. Guys get, "You Broke My Heart" songs... but women truly get LOVE songs of such great adoration from us smitten clunky fumbling males. In Summary, the power of female attributes, which certainly would include aesthetic beauty, arguably has inspired a greater inspiration to write the greatest love songs through the ages. Thus, nature, or evolutionary biology of the sexes, influences observable and apparently evident differences art of love song composition. I just find that to be an interesting observation. This song by Handel is what?... 400 years old? Chances are, prior to it being published at the time, it likely existed in an earlier version as a folk song that people ( or guys...), sang around the camp fire, or to try to serenade a woman. Guys, Listen to this song and follow the lyrics and tell me that you have never felt this way about a woman? BTW... ladies in case it isn't obvious, this is a compliment to you and yours.
  20. Hello ! I am a 18 years old piano player. I've been playing the piano for more than eight years and that's something I really enjoy despite my many injuries, thanks to it. But nevertheless, I won't stop. I also have another hobby : I really enjoy singing. It feels so comfortable and it pleases me a lot. Singing has alwyas been different, even if I can't sing "properly" (according to singing technique standards), I'm still to enjoy it and I do. I've always noticed that unlike the piano, I'm able to feel what I sing (I'm French but speak English obviously and understand the meaning of every shing I sing) and how to say that... get into the song, let it flow throw me. I sound horrible but yet, I know I've given my all ahahah. That's something I've never achieved with the piano... Feeling the song. That's sad but I guess it'll come some day. I'll never be a star and I don't want to. I want to learn singing for myself (even if I must admit... that'd be great not to sound like a duck whenever I sing with friends, for fun) because as far as my music side tells me, I've gathered two problems : A very nasal voice (I guess it's because of a poor (inexistant) breathing training something I know is very important to singing) and I just don't know when my singing is right. I never know if it's too high, too low but I guess this problem doesn't carry on with training. I've come here to ask you guys if you had stuff for me so I can learn how to sing... correctly ? I mean... being able to sing without a nasal voice and to sing in tune (hitting the right notes) ; After that, maybe I could go further but let us not get lost. I like to enjoy myself even more! I've got a piano available 24/7 so if you've got things that involves having one. I do. I've got a little music ear. I can recognise notes but I can't play by ear for example. Anyway, I hope you'll find something for someone as beginner as me ^^ Thanks a lot
  21. Hi, I am a sixteen year-old classical singer aspiring to study opera. I have a "serious" (I don't really know what qualifies as serious) vibrato problem, and I would really appreciate any advice! I have a wonderful teacher, a former professional opera singer, but she is a bit too nice and hesitates to criticize me, even when I can hear my vibrato issue clearly in recordings of my singing. I'll tell you about my voice, if that info would be helpful. I'm a soprano, range Eb3 to G#6. My voice is extremely loud and very resonant (though sometimes the resonance is a bit nasal in my low range). If I had a fach, it would most likely be lyric, as the quality is very bright, but also has a thick and almost heavy (but not certainly dark) quality to it. I have pretty good coloratura abilities, but nothing very special. When I was younger, my voice was very breathy and mostly straight-toned, with a fluttery vibrato at the end of each note. When I developed a consistent vibrato, however, it ended up being very slow. It is usually quite (but not horribly) wide as well. I've been told that it will get better as my voice develops and I get older, as I'm only sixteen, but I'm worried this will prevent me from getting training opportunities now and getting into a college vocal program. Also, please tell me if it's true that this will get better!! Here are some things about my vibrato that may help you identify the issue: It is much better in fast songs than slow songs. It improves if I take a slow song at a faster tempo. It is the slowest in the bottom of my head voice (F4-B4) and the particular notes D5, G5, and B5. It's pretty funny, really. E5, A5, and C6 spin much faster. I am an athlete and have very good abdominal muscle tone. I am not at all heavy (I run track) but I do have a pretty curvy figure. That's not important, I think, but TBH I'll include anything I think might help with the advice! I usually can't tell when my vibrato is slow until I listen to it later. I can sing very long phrases and generally have good breath control I have a GI disorder which sometimes gives me severe abdominal bloating. If I try to sing with this bloating, the vibrato is slower than ever. Hopefully I will find a medication or diet that works. Please please please any advice! I love singing, and other than my vibrato, my voice has good assets. I'd so appreciate anything. Thank you
  22. In the Spanish wikipedia article for Falsete (I'm learning it by heart ) I've read this: The first sentence says: In the Bel Canto (opera) technique, Head Voice and Chest Voice are mixed and that way Passagio is camouflaged. Since my main interest is in improving some voice similar to this, I should have a clear idea about it but I don't right now... I'll keep thinking and investigating, and will be very much interested in reading what you think about it.
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