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Found 4 results

  1. How often do you use curbing? Is curbing important in your singing? I think curbing is part of engaging twang and having a good mixed voice. It takes more effort then overdrive or belting in my opinion even though those things require more energy or exertion. It seems that curbing requires more clinching and better control as well as steadfast commitment.
  2. I have a recital with a friend of mine in January. We are singing two songs from two musicals, which, I admit, is not an area in which I have ever been trained, in spite of finding some musicals to be very entertaining and inspiring. The issues that we are encountering have a great deal to do with my intonation and I would suppose interpretation of the lyrics. The tone I ultimately have, especially whenever it relates to the areas of the songs which are "belted" is my tone becomes entirely operatic, which, the baritone feels, doesn't necessarily fit the songs. I spent seven years in opera, and while I can respect that musical theatre and opera are similar, I think their styles are very contrasted against one another. I have spent countless hours on YouTube listening to different interpretations of the same songs, and ultimately, it seems to me that more of musical theatre is a sort of spoken intonation and brighter. I try to play with my chiaroscuro, but for some reason, whenever he and I practice, I always end up with the elongated throat and operatic sound. I am unsure if this is due to the years of my training to sing a certain way, or if because somehow I find the sound that I can produce without the technique as unappealing. I am unsure. Really, I feel as if I am psyching myself out about it because it is a different style of singing that I am accustomed to. Is there any way, or are there any exercises for me to get over the fact that I don't necessarily have to sound a certain way?
  3. Hi! A little background: I have trained my vocals with a college instructor for roughly four years, I haven't had a lesson in nearly two. The reason I say this is because I had posted on Yahoo forums only to be lectured without constructive criticism by someone who had the information I was asking about only because I was hoping someone would provide it free of charge. I am a student. I am also broke. Whenever I can afford to, I will reinvest in a vocal coach because I am aware that not having one has lead me to developing bad habits. She pretty much told me I shouldn't sing at all without years of proper training; in other words, said my vocals sucked! My techniques are full of bad habits. I need help analyzing them and figuring out what I can do to release the tension and build a stronger, healthier voice--that much is certain--but I am determined to learn the techniques used by a specific singer. Anyways, here is a song of mine for example. I did every part by myself, I also produced it with Cubase LE 5 and Ozone, but I am a crap producer and I don't have great equipment. The vocals are also completely random and nonsensical because I am more concerned about the tone of my voice at the moment and would like to address that before I do any serious song writing.. This song was really just an effort to get myself out there in the first place, but I'm apprehensive to advertise myself because of the quality of my voice. Here are a few more random examples. Clip C isn't my backing track...just to clarify. It's only for an example. I'm bothered by this in a few ways. For one thing, there's no smoothness in my tone. For another, I'm shouting at times. I am actively aware of my diaphragm and attempting to further naturalize my reaction to breath down into it, but the control seems to be an issue...I've heard that I need more breath while singing higher, but I can't separate myself from pushing the notes and it actually seems like I'm using less air...I feel like the only thing that sounds good most of the time is my distorted belts.. It should probably be worth mentioning that I had a background in metal too. I was unable to learn my screaming method under a teach...so I think I may be fry screaming and I've heard that was bad as well. Could that be relative to my incorrect executions of belted distortion? I am very fond of the distorted belt, one used by my favorite singer, Jonny Craig. This song here is amazing, it's my goal to be able to sing this correctly without strain in my own unique voice. But, I would be content with starting off this song correctly without strain to build up to more challenging techniques. I am under no disillusion that I can make my voice sound like his. However, I want to be a better singer, and I am determined to reach this magnitude of greatness. The only problem is that I'm broke, although I have a job, and live in a very plain area in Missouri that harbors very few musicians or coaches who can help me achieve these goals. I live about an hour away from St. Louis. If I knew of a coach there that could help me out, that might be a decent start. I could probably even take some exercises and run with those. Most of my equipment can run my voice back into my headphones, which gives me a good representation of my overall tone, which helps me decipher where I can improve...this has actually helped me improve dramatically in the past week or so. Thank you in advanced for your services! I'm looking forward to hearing your critiques.
  4. I've gotten particularly interested in the parameter of 'edging' E vs 'curbing' C as one element of various singers' signature tones.   I thought I'd list some names and get the feedback of the experts here on the direction in which these guys tend to lean.   FWIW these aren't necessarily all singers that I particularly like; in come cases just people that are in mind because I heard them on the radio recently.  If anyone wants to add names to the list that would be great.   I realize that this is a very simplistic way to categorize singers, but hey, I'm a simplistic guy at this stage of my singing development.   As I listen to some snippets of a lot of these guys it seems that even this simple categorization doesn't work, as some of them have really round darkish sounds, but simultaneously I get a strong sense of edging type resonance.  Maybe that's just what good singers do! So if there are some other basic parameters or comments that you all want to add to the categorization, please do.      Robert Plant (E?) Billy Joel (E mostly?) Steven Tyler  Lou Gramm (C as  per Bob) Paul Rodgers (C as per Bob) Mick Jagger James Brown Chris Robinson  John Lennon Johnny Cash  Sting BB King Freddie King     Thanks, Greg