Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'edging'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WELCOME & HOW TO GET STARTED!
    • Welcome New Members!
  • SINGING & TRAINING TECHNIQUES
    • General Discussions
  • REVIEW MY SINGING
  • VOCAL GEAR
    • Microphones
    • Recording For Singers
    • Vocal Effects / Processing
  • SEEKING VOCALIST / VOCALIST AVAILABLE
    • Seeking Vocalist / Vocalist Available
  • ARTICLES / GEAR REVIEWS / INTERVIEWS
    • Vocal Gear Reviews
    • Singing Articles
    • Expert Interviews

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • Singing Reviews, Programs & Lessons
  • Microphones (Live & Recording)
  • Vocal Pedals (Effects)
  • Home Recording Gear
  • Services For Singers
  • Singing Applications
  • Vocal Health Products
  • TMV World Exclusive Interviews

Categories

  • Product Reviews
  • Articles
  • Interviews

Product Groups

  • UNLIMITED SINGING REVIEWS
  • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
  • SINGERS TEA & INHALER

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Web Site URL


Phone


How did you hear about TMV World?

Found 5 results

  1. Hello I am having real trouble finding my falsetto, I can't make that effortless sound, it is always strained. I was always able to make a voice that I thought was falsetto, but I got to the conclusion that is flageolet instead. I got really used to it and it is relaxed, and really sounds like falsetto, but I think it isn't falsetto mainly because: - It isn't connected to chest voice. I know sometimes it's difficult to connect head and chest voice, but this is extremely disconnected, it is a different world. - I am able to transition smoothly from whistle to this flageolet. Not trying hard at all, just lowering the pitch from whistle, I end up in this voice. Demo: https://instaud.io/3rzk So, an example of this strained 'falsetto', in a moment with the voice quite tired (so that the strain is noticeable): https://instaud.io/3rzm Same song, in flageolet (I know it sounds a lot like a falsetto):https://instaud.io/3rzd An example of a song, in falsetto, that sounded better, in a moment my voice wasn't that tired: https://instaud.io/3rzf (Yes, I like Ed Sheeran XD). This is as close to a relaxed falsetto that I can get. So, any advice on how to find that relaxed falsetto? Maybe I am still unable to do it because I have those muscles untrained? I've tried yawning, making the sound of an owl, or Mickey Mouse's voice... Everything is strained. Any advice, or exercise? Thank you in advance Whistle to flageolet.mp3 Strained falsetto.mp3 Flageolet.mp3
  2. I have the best edge and easiest mix in my voice in the morning, then on the afternoon I loose the edge and the mix often becomes forced. Even after a long warmup, I still don't find the same edge as in the morning. I don't talk a lot during the days, mostly working in front of a computer. One thing I have noticed earlier was that while working in front of a computer, when I got tired/dry in my eyes my I would lean my head upwards to be able to keep my eyes a little bit more closed. This stretched position of my throat caused a tired voice. Also swallowing and clearing my throat during the day seems to be a big no no. Even though I follow these rules, my voice is still tired in the afternoon.. any more ideas?
  3. Hey everyone! Just wanted to check in with some interesting reflections that I had recently with the folks who could benefit. So for background, I recently started med school and we have to take a pretty detailed course in gross anatomy that covers the entire body head to toe. I found that as a singing student, learning gross anatomy in lab and lecture has been extremely beneficial. There are so many things that we talk about and try to cue ourselves and others to do in order to achieve certain qualities in vocal production that now seem so much less mysterious, mystical, and/or unclear to me. 1. Twang - quacking, pharyngeal voice, narrowing of ari-epiglottic funnel/space/whatever people want to call it. I have seen SO many thread about "what is twang, how do we do it"... seriously, cutting into the back of the pharynx and looking at the picture like this taught a very real lesson of how close the muscular back of the tongue is to the epiglottis, which creates the necessary twang to help us negotiate pressure to adduct our vocal folds for good singing. This explains why the cue of "raise back of tongue to molars" can help get the epiglottis to move if the student does not know what it means to "twang". There are three muscles attached to the pharynx called "superior, middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictors", the infrahyoid muscles, and some of the tongue (more on that later) muscles... some of the enemies of beginning singers. 2. Support - If anyone wants any cool pictures of support muscles, please let me know and then tell me how real you want the pictures to look haha I have a better understanding now of... what muscles are used in support, how to use them, do I tighten/tense them or not?! how proper support is almost as easy as learning a few things about what proper "bracing" for daily activities and athletics is from a physical therapist. How you can squeeze your glutes to "set" the spinal alignment before you work on the breath so you KNOW 100% that you are straight. How the pelvic floor contributes. How scapular stability relates to consistent support and expansion. How pulling in from the stomach is invariably requires strength and command of the transverse abdominal muscle, so telling students to "just relax and breathe and pull in but stay relaxed" can be counter-productive because they don't realize they're engaging one muscle while keeping the other muscles in check. Also, Phil is totally right about the "fist into the gut" feeling, and Marnell is def talking about the transversus abdominis when he talks about the sensations of support (vomiting, etc) in that 1 hour long video. 3. Soft palate, the nasopharynx, sinuses - After seeing the sinuses in real life and finding them myself, I can definitely say I have a new appreciation for how vibrations and sound and fluid all interact with the sinuses in the nasopharynx. Also a new appreciation for how bad head colds with sinus problems can be. 4. Ken Tamplin's tongue - that's right, I said it. So many questions are asked every year about "wtf his tongue is doing" and if it is okay or not. My personal verdict on the topic is now out: what I learned suggests that it is indeed okay to change the shape of the tongue in the mouth while singing if you want - to a certain extent. The genioglossus (the largest tongue protruding muscle) and some other tongue muscles are attached to a bone can cause unintentional larynx raising (as larynx is also connected to said bone lol) if the tongue is protruded too far out, but where and how to shape the tongue otherwise is rather individual and totally cool if you can still form your vowels and consonants the way you want (I admit some of Ken's vowels are not how I personally would sing my vowels but I know he likes em and that's cool): this is because the muscles that do that part of tongue shaping "making concave U's or fat lizard tongues or flat tongues" are NOT attached to any bones, making them totally cool to do what you want with them, including help you form consonants. Stopping myself from going on forever now. tl;dr: Med school anatomy has confirmed to me and taught me even more about many things in vocal pedagogy that I was not sure about before, feel free to discuss how you guys might have already known this stuff or whatever or ask for cool pictures.
  4. i am a complete beginner who started using singing for stars program by seth riggs what i did was that i did edge excercises before nays nays and mum mum so does that mean that edge excercises would be of no benefit to me i would like to know about how to nay nay nay properly should i do it everyday and how often how should i feel or what sensations should i have while doing nay nay nay how should a perfect nay nay be and should it stop doing after doing it perfectly and move on to mum mum
  5. I've gotten particularly interested in the parameter of 'edging' E vs 'curbing' C as one element of various singers' signature tones.   I thought I'd list some names and get the feedback of the experts here on the direction in which these guys tend to lean.   FWIW these aren't necessarily all singers that I particularly like; in come cases just people that are in mind because I heard them on the radio recently.  If anyone wants to add names to the list that would be great.   I realize that this is a very simplistic way to categorize singers, but hey, I'm a simplistic guy at this stage of my singing development.   As I listen to some snippets of a lot of these guys it seems that even this simple categorization doesn't work, as some of them have really round darkish sounds, but simultaneously I get a strong sense of edging type resonance.  Maybe that's just what good singers do! So if there are some other basic parameters or comments that you all want to add to the categorization, please do.      Robert Plant (E?) Billy Joel (E mostly?) Steven Tyler  Lou Gramm (C as  per Bob) Paul Rodgers (C as per Bob) Mick Jagger James Brown Chris Robinson  John Lennon Johnny Cash  Sting BB King Freddie King     Thanks, Greg