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Found 47 results

  1. According to my understanding of the word, "falsetto", I am using falsetto in some places in the following clip (although not everywhere). A definition I tend to use means that you can use falsetto on just about any note in your range, low or high. Falsetto is produced when your vocal folds vibrate without being compressed (and I think that that covers quite a lot of different shades of falsetto, and falsetto mix). I see falsetto first and foremost as stylistic. Not as a fallback for reaching high notes. But, the following is a typical definition of falsetto. Look how strongly it has been associated with high pitch! They make it sound like a fallback method, rather than a style. falsetto /fɔːlˈsɛtəʊ,fɒlˈsɛtəʊ/ noun MUSIC a method of voice production used by male singers, especially tenors, to sing notes higher than their normal range. "he sang in a piercing falsetto" Similar: high voice high-pitched voice high-pitched tone shrill tone piercing tone ear-piercing tone a singer using the falsetto method of voice production. a voice or sound that is unusually high.
  2. Hey guys. So I've been singing for some years now. I'm classicaly trained, theoretically a tenor, but I could never manage to understand and make the adjustments to go higher than F4 without breaking into M2 or straining a lot. Last year I started reading a lot about voice physiology and learning contemporary singing technique. Now I can go sometimes even up to G5 (not a pretty singable tone yet, but it's there). From Bb4 up I can somehow manage a lighter sound that doesn't sound like M2, but between E4 and A4 I can only do full-on belting or something lighter but with a lot of constriction (arytenoids I guess). I'm trying to achieve a lighter and freer M1 (mixed?) sound in that range, and so I've been reading and watching many YouTube videos on that, but I'm very confused with the way scientists and vocal coaches differently name the registers and stuff, so it's being hard to clearly understand what they mean and choose a way to approach the matter. I have to say that I personally think the names Chest, Head and Mixed Voice are terrible and extremely misleading, and they did nothing but prevent me from moving forward. Understanding the vibratory mechanisms and the filter/resonance adjustments is what really is helping me evolve. And although I understand a lot of people don't benefit from scientific explanations, it's really works for me. From what I understand, SCIENTIFICALLY mixed voice can be either: 1. M1 with less vocalis contraction and more nasal airflow/rhinopharyngeal resonance, as used by man and women in contemporary music and by men in high notes in classical. 2. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance and twang in the higher range in contemporary singing. 3. M2 with more rhinopharyngeal resonance in the female first passaggio in classical. And head voice can refer to: 1. any sound in M2 2. only M2 with cartilaginous adduction Now I'm really confused with how vocal coaches use the terms. For me, the sound of what many demonstrate as Head voice - specially those who don't count falsetto as Head voice - is not M2 at all, but rather my first description of Mixed voice (less compressed M1 with rhinopharyngeal resonance). Which makes me think, when they say head voice they are referring mainly to head resonance (rhinopharynx) and not to the vibratory mechanism M2. So although many exercises for bridging/mixing/blending DO go from M1 to M2, and this is of course also used in actual singing, the "bridging" that happens most of the time in the mid-high range is simply the adjustments to go from M1 with oral resonance to M1 with nasal resonance, to allow the laryngeal tilt, less compression and lower subglottal pressure without breaking into M2. I'm still beginning in the science stuff, does anyone with more knowledge in that area agrees, disagrees or have any other thoughts on the subject and on how I could approach a softer sound between E4 and A4?
  3. So now that I am in full swing back to singing professionally between my cover band and getting back to session singing and staff writing the demands on my voice are heavier then they have been in 20 years. Especially in the band where we are doing a lot of R&B, Top 40, dance and disco. A couple of things I have realized for myself living now on the frontline of the reality of singing is that training my voice as a rock singer for all these years did some great stuff but I feel I neglected a lower bridge and lower falsetto, 2 things that are absolutely paramount with that style that aren't really that important when you're a slammin rock singer and can actually be a detriment because it can make you sound 'unauthentic'. But for all this Pharrell, Kool and the Gang, Cupid, Bruno Mars etc.. it is absolutely critical to have, not only for stylish reason but so that you can sing 50 songs every night while dancing. It all came to a head about a week and half ago, my voice felt exhausted. I was getting gassed just talking. Took a few days off, also went to the ENT to get scoped and everything is perfect looking so it's just muscular. So I started to really dig into what was going on with me and where I could improve. I started reading, watching videos, pulled out all my old workout CDs etc.. Also started back training with a few different coaches and have really learned a lot about myself and my voice the past week or so. Voice is feeling and sounding way better. So here are some of my epiphanies:    1. I need to put time in everyday working my lower blend, head voice, falsetto and lower falsetto. Both with the feeling higher in the head and more in the mask. I've been studying with Johanna Boberg who is one of the absolute most incredible R&B singers and sings full-time in a working band. She has really helped me to start to identify what's going on. She's also really boosted my confidence by appreciating my voice.   2. I need to stay diligent everyday with the right life habits; eating a healthy non-acid reflux causing diet, not eating 2 hours before bed, using  humidifier at night, not drinking cold water, long hot showers, doing vitamins & throat gargle, throat coat tea. I also ordered a oil diffuser humidifier for my studio.    3. Exercise and stretching; My buddy Jaime ran through all his vocal enhancing stretches with me this week and I have been doing them along with a little passive yoga and working out. Huge difference.   Anyway, these are some of what I am doing if anyone has some cool tricks they want to ad that be great. I am more into singing now then ever in my life and I am actually enjoying being serious about singing again. That was one of the things that kept me from wanting to sing in a band again because I just wasn't willing to do the right thing, I always knew what it took to sing full-time and just didn't want to do it but now I do and I am enjoying it. No more slacker s**t. A few companies that I have publishing deals with have been asking for me to release something new for the past few years and I just balked, I felt I didn't have anything new to say. That's gonna change after this transformation. I will definitely do a new video/audio. Probably not a book though.    Here are a couple of videos I have been enjoying to watch and are resonating with me.    
  4. Hello I am having real trouble finding my falsetto, I can't make that effortless sound, it is always strained. I was always able to make a voice that I thought was falsetto, but I got to the conclusion that is flageolet instead. I got really used to it and it is relaxed, and really sounds like falsetto, but I think it isn't falsetto mainly because: - It isn't connected to chest voice. I know sometimes it's difficult to connect head and chest voice, but this is extremely disconnected, it is a different world. - I am able to transition smoothly from whistle to this flageolet. Not trying hard at all, just lowering the pitch from whistle, I end up in this voice. Demo: https://instaud.io/3rzk So, an example of this strained 'falsetto', in a moment with the voice quite tired (so that the strain is noticeable): https://instaud.io/3rzm Same song, in flageolet (I know it sounds a lot like a falsetto):https://instaud.io/3rzd An example of a song, in falsetto, that sounded better, in a moment my voice wasn't that tired: https://instaud.io/3rzf (Yes, I like Ed Sheeran XD). This is as close to a relaxed falsetto that I can get. So, any advice on how to find that relaxed falsetto? Maybe I am still unable to do it because I have those muscles untrained? I've tried yawning, making the sound of an owl, or Mickey Mouse's voice... Everything is strained. Any advice, or exercise? Thank you in advance Whistle to flageolet.mp3 Strained falsetto.mp3 Flageolet.mp3
  5. https://youtu.be/FxZZwxR6hyk https://youtu.be/M5ymDCllhd8 https://youtu.be/fKmR38DpgkA https://youtu.be/9EHat-NCseY I need to know if I sound good in tone and where I need to improve(vocal analysis). Also I don’t know if I’m a tenor or baritone.
  6. Hello, Im currently a student and i love singing alot, but i couldnt afford a vocal class and im facing this problem with my voice, and i dont know what is this or why it happen. is my voice broken??? https://soundcloud.com/nicole-chang-959104894/whats-this-weird-sound i sing with my head voice at the beginning, it starts at F3 and my head voice it very weak, then i tried changing from chest voice to head voice, it has this really weird sound. anyone can tell me why this happen? and how can i fix this? pleaseeeeeee
  7. Hello, Im currently a student and i love singing alot, but i couldnt afford a vocal class and im facing this problem with my voice, and i dont know what is this or why it happen. is my voice broken??? https://soundcloud.com/nicole-chang-959104894/whats-this-weird-sound i sing with my head voice at the beginning, it starts at F3 and my head voice it very weak, then i tried changing from chest voice to head voice, it has this really weird sound. anyone can tell me why this happen? and how can i fix this? pleaseeeeeee
  8. I'm Noah, I'm from New Zealand, and I'm almost 15. I've been singing for about 4 years now, mostly in the 3rd octave (My voice dropped relatively early, around 12). However, I'd like to build up some confidence in my upper register (above say G4), where up until now I've resorted to yelling (small clip provided) This threshold used to be a lot lower, close to E4, but over time this has moved up. What I think I know about my voice. Based on my dad's range and tone (we both have the same range, about D2-C6) I think I am a tenor, albeit slightly lower set. My passaggio seems to be between Eb4-G4 I'd like to develop a mixed coordination of some sort so I don't have to yell when singing notes in the upper 4th octave, and also to be able to connect my falsetto to my full voice. I've been working on this for a few months now, and I've found that I am able to slide smoothly between my chest voice and falsetto on a closed "oo" or "ii" vowel. This is only going up though (I can't slide bACK from falsetto to chest w/o breaking). I have also found another voice that is connected to my chest that I can take pretty high (goes up to C#5 on a good day, which is my highest yelled note; i've managed to get it to around an f5 on some occasions), but it is veRY VERY light (also an example provided). My question is: What exercises do I need to be using, how do I use them effectively, and what is this mysterious upper voice? Thank you (excuse the whistle at the beginning, i was messing around lol) Ballad Of Mona Lisa.mp4 Head Voice?.mp4
  9. I have had an ongoing problem for the past year. It started when I sang too harshly at rehearsal last October and lost my voice. It was slow coming back, during which I basically had no falsetto, and started seeing an ENT. I was diagnosed as having acid reflux and post-nasal drip. I also took allergy medication. The meds did nothing and I eventually stopped taking them. My voice was not getting better, I could no longer scream, which I used to be able to do extremely easily. I've also had headaches every day and a weak, fragile voice, even when talking. It feels crackly and when I try to sing higher in my chest voice, it feels tight and weak. During the summer another complication developed when I sing my falsetto, which I can describe as the sound Chewbacca makes, but coming from my vocal cords. Sometimes it's even a nasty wheeze, a lot of the time no sound comes out, just air. I have to push really hard for any sound to come out. Shortly after I developed this complication I started taking my acid reflux meds again. I've been seeing a different ENT for the past couple months now and he looked in my throat: I have no nodules or anything; in fact he said other than some acid reflux, which has been actually been getting BETTER, my throat looks fine. He said that weird Chewbacca sound is fremitus. He told me to not talk or anything for a week, and that should do it. I ended that week of vocal rest a few days ago and everything is still the same: that weird vibrating, the headaches, the shortness of breath, and my voice giving out when I try to sing higher notes. Even with low notes it often cracks. I've also been having difficulty speaking, I have to push really hard to speak. A few months ago I saw a vocal therapist; she ended our sessions early because it was obvious that my technique was fine and nothing was changing. I've been doing singing vocal exercises for a while, and I had instruction from a vocal coach for 2 months. My technique is good. I just have no idea what is wrong with me at this point, it's been just about a year. Any help is appreciated. Thanks. I will attach an mp3 of that weird Chewbacca sound I'm talking about with my falsetto. IMG_6189.mp3
  10. HI all OK so today someone told me that there are 4 voice types The first. Is the shy sound The second. Is a puppy sound The third. Is a winey winging sound The forth. Is a call/ belt sound Dose anyone know what I am talking about please and if so what is the proper term for all this?
  11. Hi to everyone! I've been reading this forum for a couple of years now and always found it very interesting and helpful in dealing with some of my own issues, so I thought I'd post this project that I've got going on. For a long time, I have suffered from vocal tension and inability to sing past D4 without pushing the "chest voice"/ overly-engaging the TA's basically. However, in the last year or so, I have experienced great relief after starting to do falsetto exercises suggested by Anthony Frisell in his manual "Training Baritone Voices". After reading many other sources later on, I have started questioning the usefulness of voice classification, purely from psychological point in the beginning (belief that one is a lower voice and its effect on the voice and singing), but now also physiological (neglecting upper range), especially in contemporary music (pop, rock, jazz, music theatre...). So now, I am writing a dissertation on the validity of voice classification in contemporary music and have already got some interesting answers. However, since there is barely any research done in relation to contemporary music, I would really be grateful if any of the members here, who give voice lessons, would participate. This is the link if anyone is interested: https://goo.gl/forms/uLMWByDMKYv4IWMk1 Thank you and feel free to spread the link if you find it useful! In general, I would also love to hear your opinions on this. Do you think tutors should classify their students and why?
  12. I've got this slight problem with my voice, and thought I'd get your guys opinions on it. Basically, as the title states, I can't find my falsetto. It's been this way for 5 years maybe? I think this whole thing started after I caught a particulary bad flu. The rest of my voice is perfectly fine and I have no problems getting into "head voice", but when I try to get into falsetto I crack and go into head voice instead. Sometimes trying falsetto even hurts. The only time I can sing stuff in falsetto is after a long gig or practice session. What's the deal? This hasn't bothered me for the longest time but I've been starting to feel as if there's this whole part of my voice I can't seem to unlock. Is this a matter of persistent vocal training or is there something wrong with my vocal cords? Thanks a lot in advance!
  13. https://app.box.com/s/hipoe5h4ahmj0f3f2n58hvkgkmy4du15 Here's a clip of me singing the chorus to "Lay Me Down" by Sam Smith. The highest note I'm hitting is an A4 (I'm singing it a half step higher than the original). As a comparison, here's a guy singing it on "The Voice": https://youtu.be/zAaVoMLblDY?t=34s To me, his sound is so much meatier and much more chesty. To me, my voice sounds like Barry Gibb from the Bee Gees or an Axl Rose. Nothing wrong with either of them, but not the effect I'm going for. Basically, my question is: If I continue to do meowing exercises / sirens / slides, will my tone eventually darken? Or am I doing something completely wrong to generate this tone? Other sub questions: Should I be enunciating these vowels more with the "ng" sound to try to resonate it more in my nose? Or should it feel more like a "ha" sound to try to bring up my chest more into the mix? Lastly, here's another sample of me singing high notes with a more "bottom to top" approach up to G4 (Wise men(G4) say..). My problem is, I feel like I'm definitely "pulling up" my chest voice to hit the G4 with that tone is pitchy and strained. The A4 I'm hitting in Lay Me Down doesn't strain me at all but it doesn't have the same timbre quality as this G4.
  14. Hello! First of all i'm new to this forum.And i thank you guys for this forum.Now,my problem is that i had falsetto range of A4-C6 1.5 years ago approximately.I'm 19 years old and my voice dropped when i was 12.But now when i try to sing falsetto i can't do it.Instead i sing with falsetto like sound but it is not quite falsetto it is connected and has ringing quality and i can only sing it till E5 after this i have to strain.If there is a possible solution to this i will be very glad for your help.Thank you!
  15. soprano. Still hitting it with power in her 60s. Always able to smoothly move between various coordinations. I have a feeling she barely ever sang anywhere near her full potential on most of her hits etc some nice belting at the end of this clip We had this album when I was a kid. I wore it out. Like everyone else, i was in love with her. Very powerful stuff. for those who say things like "all that whispy falsetto isnt impressive blah blah".....go ahead and post your best falsetto with anything near this emotional power lol. She moves in and out of that falsettoey stuff quite nicely something like an F#6 at the end of this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FclDw9TfaoM
  16. So a month ago I was singing with very horrible technique and ended up straining my voice. As a result my throat felt a bit sore and I lost quite a bit of my vocal range. If I wanted to reach a higher note I would have to increase my volume. My falsetto in particular was dead. It had nowhere near the range it had before. Over time though with some vocal rest, my voice got better. Then one morning I woke up, and my falsetto felt strange. When I did my falsetto, especially higher falsetto notes it felt as if though I was doing vocal fry. The notes would sort of cut in and out, but the rest of my voice felt a lot better. Now that sensation is gone, but the issue I have is that I can't really do my falsetto at a super low volume. I used to be able to sing in my falsetto at really low volumes, almost to the point where I couldn't hear it. This was useful for practicing transitioning from my falsetto to full voice. However, now whenever I try to do my falsetto at this super low volume, nothing comes out. I have to go a bit louder. While it is still really quite, there are times when I need to be even more quite, and I just cannot be quite without my falsetto cutting out. I've also noticed a lack of control with my falsetto which is something I didn't have a couple days ago. Sometimes its a little hard to maintain a pitch. Also, if I try to make the falsetto louder, it dissolves into what sounds like a fully connected register with chord closure. (THIS IS A REALLY STRANGE FEELING). The transition has almost no break. Its a recent issue, but is it also serious issue? Should I just do vocal rest? Please help!
  17. Hello! I am 21 year old guy, completely new to singing,(a decent guitar player) and i have tried to measure my vocal range for few days now. My problem, probably a good thing actually, my voice doesn't ever break when i slide a note up. My lowest note is C2 but as i go up i don't notice a point where something would change, it just goes higher and thinner. My voice ends around F6 where it becomes the worst, squeezed, barely sustained falsetto you would have ever heard. Is there any way to measure where head voice ends and where i enter falsetto.
  18. Hi All, I'm a 24, male and new in singing. I would just like to ask if the below is an example of a Head, a mixed or a falsetto? This is me singing a line from "Off to the races" of Lana Del Rey. http://vocaroo.com/i/s1ARwhAGcmQy Thanks,
  19. I submitted this in the Challenge for BeeGees. It is late. I am tired, but wanted to post something. Be kind, this is a work in progress and a little to laid back to be effective
  20. I could have said this in Tristan's thread about falsetto, but I'd like it if we can talk more of whistling. I've thought that for some of us, when we want to develop falsetto, it might be useful to imagine we are whistling instead of singing. Also, do you think our whistling and singing range are the same? I can whistle in two different styles: one is the typical with lips a bit rounded, and in the other my lips don't show I am whistling. People look around to try and find who is. It is funny it looks like we also need to practice whistling to get the coordinations right.
  21. Hey guys! I'm a guy, and have always had random access to which seems like the whistle register - although it seems like an extension of my falsetto and I never count it as my usual range. It comes and goes, more often not there, and usually airy and disconnected from the rest of my voice. But the WEIRDEST thing happened - I let out a yawn and made a noise. I went from the bottom of my range, up to my head voice (which stops at about E5), and went into a fully connected whistle register. I was hitting up to an E6 VERY clearly, completely connected to the rest of my voice. I was gliding up and down (to my lowest note - A2) with complete ease, and it felt and sounded more like a part of my head voice as opposed to an airy, difficult to produced falsetto. This has never happened to me before, so I found it pretty exciting I could easily get completely connected heady sounding note all the way up there. But alas, it just kinda stopped and I wish I recorded it for you guys to decipher what was going on! I was wondering if any other guys (or girls) have any experience of something like this happening. Are there any ways of nurturing this? Tried to do some lip rolls up there but now I can't access it as easily
  22. Hi, I am new here and I hope I am not breaking the forum rules by such questions So, I am 17 years old male who really likes singing but I am curre tly confused about many things. When I was a child (11-14 years maybe), I sang in a choir and I probably had one of the highest voices (so I was classified as boy soprano), but I stopped attending the choir around the age of 13/14. However, I didn't stop singing and I sang songs that I liked. I haven't really thought about such things as voice ranges until now though. By the way, classmates keep telling me that I have unnaturally high speaking voice. I have decided to join school choir few weeks ago and, to my surprise, not only I was classified as a tenor, but also I was told that my highest note they wanted me to sing - G4 - is higher than most tenors have. Well, as I've "tested" my vocal range (without any technique, warm up or so) few days before joining the choir, I was expecting they'll tell me I am a (high) baritone. So about my voice range (C4 is middle C I hope) - my absolute minimum is probably F2, but I usually can't sing comfortably below C3, my absolute maximum is A4, but I usually can't sing it comfortably (and sometimes I can't just sing it, for example when I've sung in this height for a long time - for example now ), so I suppose G4 is my "reasonable" maximum. Another strange thing is my falsetto. I have good-sounding falsetto, but the problem is that my falsetto maximum is C5, so I usually don't need to use it, as I can sing with my "normal" voice. I really like to practice singing in my boundaries, so I often try to sing around F2 and G/A4 (which leads to temporary (I hope) unability to sing A4 and sore throat. And I don't hear any registry changes, my voice sounds the same to me in every height (I can't hear any head voice or things like that)... So my questions are: Am I right when I think I am probably a baritone? Can I damage my voice by singing in my range boundaries? Is there a hope that I'll be able to extend my range to more "tenor" height (notes A4, B4, C5), for example when I start to attend a singing teacher (I think of that, but not just because of extending range, but because I simply want to practice my voice, as people tell me I have beautiful voice...) Similar question, but about falsetto - Can I extend my falestto above C5, for example F5? Even if such things are possible (I am definitely not sure), I understand it would be long and challenging.
  23. Hii... i'm posting this one link here... its a pretty untidy take at the song I am confused as to whether this hooty sound is head voice or what is supposedly called the 'reinforced falsetto' .. what i know is that its not meaty enough the way true resonant head voice is ... I've nowadays taken to exercising for a fuller head voice..But i wanted to know just what i've done here
  24. Hi everyone, Im Connor Aiden a 17 year old vocalist currently in training in London (Popular Performance Vocals) and I'm having a bit of trouble regarding my 'official' voice type. Although I have sang in classical styles I initially taught myself how to sing and mainly listen to female singers which has confused me about which octave I sing things in. I was also put in a choir as a tenor so have been reading treble clef and unknowingly singing an octave down the whole time. I thought I must be a baritone but I have a peculiar higher falsetto range: Chest: G2-E4 (Strong, Belty as I get to D/E4) Mixed: I am working on but seem to have no mixing traits currently Falsetto: F4-F#5 (Breathy, Slightly Unclean) (can bring it down to B4) If anyone has any information or knowledge to share I would be very grateful as It would clear a lot of problems up and get me on the right track vocally. Thankyou!
  25. Hi! I'm new to this forum! I have a question but don't know any one to ask! I'm practicing the mixed voice recently. But when I sing, record and listen again, I think it's so weird! I have no idea it is a mixed voice or something else. Some people said that it is a falsetto, some said that it is a light (or heady) mixed voice. So it makes me so confused! Please help me guys! Because I have been warned not to continue singing in that way Thanks for reading my topic!